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(Business Insider)   The poor are running out of places to live   ( businessinsider.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Household income in the United States, area median income, New York City, Apartment, Renting, low-income households, apartments, low-income apartments  
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3758 clicks; posted to Politics » on 09 Nov 2017 at 6:26 PM (13 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-11-09 04:29:06 PM  
Nirvana - Something in the way [ lyrics ]
Youtube aXap5hZaqZ8


/Not from the original 1991 release of Nevermind
 
2017-11-09 04:36:55 PM  
Detroit has a couple of houses as rock bottom prices
 
2017-11-09 04:45:19 PM  
We're almost at this point in the Trek timeline:

img.fark.netView Full Size


/Subby
 
2017-11-09 05:15:18 PM  
They're going to feel pretty dumb for throwing away the box that their refrigerators came in.
 
2017-11-09 06:07:18 PM  
Fark must have evicted the Obvious Tag.
 
2017-11-09 06:10:15 PM  
Seattle's got a new plan coming around. Not sure how I feel about all of it but the rents are getting ridiculous so something's got to be done. Forcing developers to do more does seem like the way to go. Latest here:

More growth coming to Seattle. Will it mean cheaper housing?
 
2017-11-09 06:30:36 PM  
dumpaday.comView Full Size
 
2017-11-09 06:31:18 PM  
Let them live in cake.
 
2017-11-09 06:31:46 PM  
If the poor had invested in real estate to make a profit like the rest of U.S. they wouldn't be poor.
 
2017-11-09 06:32:04 PM  
The Doors - 5 to 1 (The Doors Movie)
Youtube KgGtIxmIy2c
 
2017-11-09 06:32:07 PM  
I hear that low-rent high rise buildings are a great way to provide housing for poor people in American urban centers.  You could even name these buildings something simple, yet definitive.  Oh, what to call these kinds of urban renewal projects...
 
2017-11-09 06:32:13 PM  
That's the problem, they need to stay in places to live. Running out of them just makes them homeless.
 
2017-11-09 06:32:59 PM  
But hey, maybe talking about Hillary's emails and how she ignored the upper Midwest will help.

Also, America's wealthy families desperately need tax cuts and the repeal of the death tax.

Because billionaires built this country with no help from anyone, so they should get everything they want.
 
2017-11-09 06:34:02 PM  
fxguide.comView Full Size
 
2017-11-09 06:34:14 PM  
Property taxes. Cities want to build more expensive homes so they zone for it, because they get a bigger cut off the land than if they zoned it cheaper.
 
2017-11-09 06:34:20 PM  
Whoops. That was Val Kilmer.

My bad.
 
2017-11-09 06:35:39 PM  
Yet all of those unemployed people in flyover country need to move to those cities with unaffordable housing instead of being upset about the lack of opportunity where they can barely still keep a much cheaper roof over their heads.
 
2017-11-09 06:36:20 PM  
yeah, well, I can park at quite a few places on PCH, subby.
 
2017-11-09 06:37:47 PM  

Soup4Bonnie: Seattle's got a new plan coming around. Not sure how I feel about all of it but the rents are getting ridiculous so something's got to be done. Forcing developers to do more does seem like the way to go. Latest here:

More growth coming to Seattle. Will it mean cheaper housing?


No, Seattle won't build its way out of expensive housing.  It will, however, make a lot of money for the property developers who have conned the progressives into thinking it can.
 
2017-11-09 06:38:45 PM  
In a perfect world the federal government would start building apartments and houses like crazy all over the country and renting them out at prices below the market rate. Flood the housing market with cheap, affordable housing to drive down prices.

Use federal authority and eminent domain to get around zoning laws. Make construction workers permanent federal employees, paying a decent wage. Maybe do a civil service type thing and offer free education or housing to people who sign up for a tour as a construction worker.
 
2017-11-09 06:39:57 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

Well they'll have plenty of time to think about living in a van down by the river, when they're living in a VAN DOWN BY THE RIVER!
 
2017-11-09 06:41:13 PM  
Hey hey hey kids! Who wants to play another exciting round of "Rhymes with 'yaks huts Gerda stealthy'"?
 
2017-11-09 06:43:13 PM  

feltrider: In a perfect world the federal government would start building apartments and houses like crazy all over the country and renting them out at prices below the market rate. Flood the housing market with cheap, affordable housing to drive down prices.

Use federal authority and eminent domain to get around zoning laws. Make construction workers permanent federal employees, paying a decent wage. Maybe do a civil service type thing and offer free education or housing to people who sign up for a tour as a construction worker.


Or you can do what Tokyo did and get government out of the way.  Property owners are given wide latitude on what they can do with their land.  The result: a middle class family can afford a single family home in one of the most expensive cities in the world.
 
2017-11-09 06:43:54 PM  
Capitalism: where we have millions of empty homes, but a huge homeless population. We also throw away tons of perfectly edible food every day while people are starving, and turn away the sick because they can't pay the exorbitant prices for life-saving medicines and procedures.

Tell me again how American capitalism is the 'good' economic system. Because we prefer to let millions of our poor and 'undesirables' die slowly and in agony, instead of just outright executing them?
 
2017-11-09 06:44:14 PM  
Here is a GREAT place to put them!
qph.ec.quoracdn.netView Full Size

feed the fish.
 
2017-11-09 06:44:20 PM  
Well, both sides can share the blame on this too.

There used to be lots of cheap housing, single-room-occupancy or SROs they were called. One room, no bathroom or kitchen, but cheap. Then the slumlords got hold of them, wouldn't keep the lights on, etc., so liberals stepped in and got laws requiring apartments to have their own kitchens, plumbing, electrical hookups...human dignity and all that. At the same time, conservatives wanted to clear out the slums, move in better businesses, nicer homes, etc., so renovation was a win-win for everyone except the poor who couldn't afford these new, spiffy, amenity-rich apartments.

Just like closing mental hospitals and eliminating substance abuse clinics, preventing the building of cheap places to live is one of those things everyone did for the most well-intentioned of reasons, that had terrible repercussions.
 
2017-11-09 06:44:40 PM  
Also, an observation that the poor could live in "affordable" housing if anyone wanted to build it, but they don't.

Making giant skyscrapers full of expensive apartments that foreign scumbags essentially hide their stolen money in is more profitable.

Ask the president.
 
2017-11-09 06:44:43 PM  

feltrider: Flood the housing market with cheap, affordable housing to drive down prices.


We did that in the 80s. Then we massively cut social services so the people living in said housing had even less to get by on. Then crack and a President who actively turned his back on the poor.

What I'm saying is, maybe this isn't the President to try that again with. Have you forgotten who the HUD Secretary is?
 
2017-11-09 06:45:22 PM  
Rent Is Too Damn High Party Debate
Youtube kcsNbQRU5TI
 
2017-11-09 06:47:07 PM  

feltrider: In a perfect world the federal government would start building apartments and houses like crazy all over the country and renting them out at prices below the market rate. Flood the housing market with cheap, affordable housing to drive down prices.

Use federal authority and eminent domain to get around zoning laws. Make construction workers permanent federal employees, paying a decent wage. Maybe do a civil service type thing and offer free education or housing to people who sign up for a tour as a construction worker.


Building houses is completely unnecessary. there are more vacant bank-owned houses sitting unused in this country than there are actual homeless people. They could all have a bed by tomorrow night if anyone cared to do something about it.
 
2017-11-09 06:48:24 PM  
I'm comfortably situated and all but I have the mind of the ever restless hobo and do a lot of tromping about..  You wouldn't believe the number of places there are within city limits that make perfectly viable non-visible encampment sites if you were inclined to do so.
 
2017-11-09 06:48:41 PM  
No shiat, I live in a town of 100,000 people, I'm scraping the bottom of the barrel rent wise and it's still 800 dollars a month for a single bedroom. Last time my rent got raised I spent a week looking for a new place and couldn't find anything cheaper.
 
2017-11-09 06:48:50 PM  
Just make it illegal to be homeless. Problem solved.
 
2017-11-09 06:49:10 PM  
It almost seems like unlimited human breeding has limits or something. That's totally weird.
 
2017-11-09 06:51:22 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: Also, an observation that the poor could live in "affordable" housing if anyone wanted to build it, but they don't.

Making giant skyscrapers full of expensive apartments that foreign scumbags essentially hide their stolen money in is more profitable.

Ask the president.


Maybe we should bar foreign investors from investing in US real estate (i.e. double, non-deductable excise tax on any non-occupied dwelling registered to a foreign address).
 
2017-11-09 06:51:37 PM  
Vote, f*ckers!
 
2017-11-09 06:51:39 PM  

Raoul Eaton: Soup4Bonnie: Seattle's got a new plan coming around. Not sure how I feel about all of it but the rents are getting ridiculous so something's got to be done. Forcing developers to do more does seem like the way to go. Latest here:

More growth coming to Seattle. Will it mean cheaper housing?

No, Seattle won't build its way out of expensive housing.  It will, however, make a lot of money for the property developers who have conned the progressives into thinking it can.


It's one of the few places I split with a lot of the progressives, but I will readily admit I don't know enough about challenges or stakeholders to speak to it intelligently.  I will say that something like this doesn't seem "outstanding!" to me, although several of the people I respect on other issues cheered it.
img.fark.netView Full Size


Not sure if this is the one or if there's another just like it, but it was heralded because it provided for 17 units where there used to be only a single family dwelling.  My thoughts immediately go to "who tf would want to live in the house next to that monster, and where would they all park, and jfc now I have 17 neighbors to contend with on a single property?"
 
2017-11-09 06:51:57 PM  

StatelyGreekAutomaton: Just make it illegal to be homeless. Problem solved.


You sound Floridian.
 
2017-11-09 06:55:06 PM  
Let's be honest, poor people really suck and nobody wants to live next to them.

Ask a poor person and they'll tell you.  They don't want their kids growing up in a neighborhood filled with other poor people either.
 
2017-11-09 06:55:24 PM  

blackminded: feltrider: Flood the housing market with cheap, affordable housing to drive down prices.

We did that in the 80s. Then we massively cut social services so the people living in said housing had even less to get by on. Then crack and a President who actively turned his back on the poor.

What I'm saying is, maybe this isn't the President to try that again with. Have you forgotten who the HUD Secretary is?


To be fair its a pie in the sky fantasy policy. Modern democrats would laugh you out of a room for suggesting it, nevermind the republicans.
 
2017-11-09 06:57:06 PM  

gnarlywizzard: feltrider: In a perfect world the federal government would start building apartments and houses like crazy all over the country and renting them out at prices below the market rate. Flood the housing market with cheap, affordable housing to drive down prices.

Use federal authority and eminent domain to get around zoning laws. Make construction workers permanent federal employees, paying a decent wage. Maybe do a civil service type thing and offer free education or housing to people who sign up for a tour as a construction worker.

Building houses is completely unnecessary. there are more vacant bank-owned houses sitting unused in this country than there are actual homeless people. They could all have a bed by tomorrow night if anyone cared to do something about it.


The problem isn't having enough housing. It's having enough housing in the right places.
 
2017-11-09 06:59:59 PM  

Soup4Bonnie: Not sure if this is the one or if there's another just like it, but it was heralded because it provided for 17 units where there used to be only a single family dwelling. My thoughts immediately go to "who tf would want to live in the house next to that monster, and where would they all park, and jfc now I have 17 neighbors to contend with on a single property?"


Portland has that problem too. Medium density housing going up all over the place to accommodate the ~50,000 people moving in over the next 5 years, and nothing but street parking for anyone. My wife and I stayed in the city for a year, and then moved out to Beaverton a couple of years ago to be closer to work. This past year, a bunch of new medium density projects have started going up in the suburbs too, and I have yet to see one with an underground/ground floor garage.

Yes, there is decent public transit, but most of the people moving into the area are from places where there isn't any, so they all have cars.
 
2017-11-09 07:00:45 PM  
So I'm about to buy a house. Look at this ridiculousness:

Application Fee:This fee covers the cost for the lender to process your application. Before submitting an application, ask your lender what this fee covers. It can often include things like a credit check for your credit score or appraisal as well. Not all lenders charge an application fee, and it can often be negotiated.
Appraisal: This is paid to the appraisal company to confirm the fair market value of the home.
Attorney Fee: This pays for an attorney to review the closing documents on behalf of the buyer or the lender. This is not required in all states.
Closing Fee or Escrow Fee: This is paid to the title company, escrow company or attorney for conducting the closing. The title company or escrow oversees the closing as an independent party in your home purchase. Some states require a real estate attorney be present at every closing.
Courier Fee: This covers the cost of transporting documents to complete the loan transaction as quickly as possible.
Credit Report:A Tri-merge credit report is pulled to get your credit history and score. Your credit score plays a big role in determining the interest rate you'll get on your loan.
Escrow Deposit for Property Taxes & Mortgage Insurance:Often you are asked to put down two months of property tax and mortgage insurance payments at closing.
FHA Up-Front Mortgage Insurance Premium (UPMIP):If you have an FHA loan, you'll be required to pay the UPMIP of 1.75% of the base loan amount. You are also able to roll this into the cost of the loan if you prefer.
Flood Determinationor Life of Loan Coverage: This is paid to a third party to determine if the property is located in a flood zone. If the property is found to be located within a flood zone, you will need to buy flood insurance. The insurance, of course, is paid separately.
Home Inspection:You will likely get your own home inspection to verify the condition of a property and to check for home repairs that may be needed before closing.
Home Owners Association Transfer Fees: The Seller will pay for this transfer which will show that the dues are paid current, what the dues are, a copy of the association financial statements, minutes and notices.  The buyer should review these documents to determine if the Association has enough reserves in place to avert future special assessments, check to see if there are special assessments, legal action, or any other items that might be of concern.  Also included will be Association by-laws, rules and regulations and CC & Rs.
Homeowners' Insurance: This covers possible damages to your home. Your first year's insurance is often paid at closing.
Lender's Policy Title Insurance: This is insurance to assure the lender that you own the home and the lender's mortgage is a valid lien, and it protects the lender if there is a problem with the title. Similar to the title search, but always a separate line item.
Lead-Based Paint Inspection:Covers the cost of evaluating lead-based paint risk.
Loan Discount Points:"Points" are prepaid interest. One point is one percent of your loan amount. This is a lump sum payment that lowers your monthly payment for the life of your loan.
Owner's Policy Title Insurance: This is an insurance policy that protects you in the event someone challenges your ownership of the home. It is usually optional.
Origination Fee:This covers the lender's administrative costs. It's usually about 1 percent of the total loan but you can sometimes find mortgages with no origination fee.
Pest Inspection:This fee covers the cost to inspect for termites or dry rot, which is required in some states and required for government loans.  Repairs can get expensive if evidence of termites, dry rot or other wood damage is found.
Prepaid Interest:Most lenders will ask you to prepay any interest that will accrue between closing and the date of your first mortgage payment.
Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI): If you're making a down payment that's less than 20% of the home's purchase price, chances are you'll be required to pay PMI. If so, you may need to pay the first month's PMI payment at closing.
Property Tax: Typically, lenders will want any taxes due within 60 days of purchase by the loan servicer to be paid at closing.
Recording Fees: A fee charged by your local recording office, usually city or county, for the recording of public land records.
Survey Fee: This fee goes to a survey company to verify all property lines and things like shared fences on the property.  This is not required in all states.
Title Company Title Searchor Exam Fee: This fee is paid to the title company for doing a thorough search of the property's records. The title company researches the deed to your new home, ensuring that no one else has a claim to the property.
Transfer Taxes: This is the tax paid when the title passes from seller to buyer.
Underwriting Fee: This also goes to your lender, covering the cost of researching whether or not to approve you for the loan.
VA Funding Fee: If you have a VA loan, you may be required to pay a VA funding fee at closing (or you can roll this fee into the cost of the loan if you prefer). This is a percentage of the loan amount that the VA assesses to fund the VA home loan program, however some borrowers are exempt from this fee. The percentage depends on your type of service and the amount of your down payment.

Plus a whole lot more...
 
2017-11-09 07:04:26 PM  
They must have a real brain surgeon working on this problem.
 
2017-11-09 07:05:14 PM  

gingerjet: feltrider: In a perfect world the federal government would start building apartments and houses like crazy all over the country and renting them out at prices below the market rate. Flood the housing market with cheap, affordable housing to drive down prices.

Use federal authority and eminent domain to get around zoning laws. Make construction workers permanent federal employees, paying a decent wage. Maybe do a civil service type thing and offer free education or housing to people who sign up for a tour as a construction worker.

Or you can do what Tokyo did and get government out of the way.  Property owners are given wide latitude on what they can do with their land.  The result: a middle class family can afford a single family home in one of the most expensive cities in the world.


notsureifserious.jpg

Tokyo is the 4th most expensive city to live in
 
2017-11-09 07:05:38 PM  

Soup4Bonnie: Raoul Eaton: Soup4Bonnie: Seattle's got a new plan coming around. Not sure how I feel about all of it but the rents are getting ridiculous so something's got to be done. Forcing developers to do more does seem like the way to go. Latest here:

More growth coming to Seattle. Will it mean cheaper housing?

No, Seattle won't build its way out of expensive housing.  It will, however, make a lot of money for the property developers who have conned the progressives into thinking it can.

It's one of the few places I split with a lot of the progressives, but I will readily admit I don't know enough about challenges or stakeholders to speak to it intelligently.  I will say that something like this doesn't seem "outstanding!" to me, although several of the people I respect on other issues cheered it.
[img.fark.net image 355x550]

Not sure if this is the one or if there's another just like it, but it was heralded because it provided for 17 units where there used to be only a single family dwelling.  My thoughts immediately go to "who tf would want to live in the house next to that monster, and where would they all park, and jfc now I have 17 neighbors to contend with on a single property?"


We have one of those going up in our alley in the U-District. The city solicited opinions in Summer, some months after they started construction. Same deal, 20 apts, no added parking.
 
2017-11-09 07:07:06 PM  

Soup4Bonnie: Raoul Eaton: Soup4Bonnie: Seattle's got a new plan coming around. Not sure how I feel about all of it but the rents are getting ridiculous so something's got to be done. Forcing developers to do more does seem like the way to go. Latest here:

More growth coming to Seattle. Will it mean cheaper housing?

No, Seattle won't build its way out of expensive housing.  It will, however, make a lot of money for the property developers who have conned the progressives into thinking it can.

It's one of the few places I split with a lot of the progressives, but I will readily admit I don't know enough about challenges or stakeholders to speak to it intelligently.  I will say that something like this doesn't seem "outstanding!" to me, although several of the people I respect on other issues cheered it.
[img.fark.net image 355x550]

Not sure if this is the one or if there's another just like it, but it was heralded because it provided for 17 units where there used to be only a single family dwelling.  My thoughts immediately go to "who tf would want to live in the house next to that monster, and where would they all park, and jfc now I have 17 neighbors to contend with on a single property?"


What I'm seeing is a lot of nice, modest older homes that mostly belong to long-time residents being replaced by, or surrounded by, townhouses that are only slightly less appalling than the thing in that picture.  Going.gone:  trees, porches, yards, neighbor-friendly housing where we all know exactly who lives on the block (and we do . . . . ).  New and coming: high fences at the sidewalk's edge, no trees, entire lots paved instead of permeable surface, bland "architecture" that reflects what's quick and cheap to build.  Thanks, Amazon.

///when I was young and poor
//there were a lot of places I couldn't afford to live; there still are
/I didn't demand that other people let their neighborhoods be farked architecturally and socially so I could live there
 
2017-11-09 07:07:42 PM  

feltrider: gnarlywizzard: feltrider: In a perfect world the federal government would start building apartments and houses like crazy all over the country and renting them out at prices below the market rate. Flood the housing market with cheap, affordable housing to drive down prices.

Use federal authority and eminent domain to get around zoning laws. Make construction workers permanent federal employees, paying a decent wage. Maybe do a civil service type thing and offer free education or housing to people who sign up for a tour as a construction worker.

Building houses is completely unnecessary. there are more vacant bank-owned houses sitting unused in this country than there are actual homeless people. They could all have a bed by tomorrow night if anyone cared to do something about it.

The problem isn't having enough housing. It's having enough housing in the right places.


The problem is greedy farkwads have let prices for pretty much everything skyrocket, while wages have remained stagnant and it's been pretty much impossible, for that and many other reasons, for people who were born poor to become less poor.
 
2017-11-09 07:08:04 PM  

NewportBarGuy: They must have a real brain surgeon working on this problem.

Really though. Have we had a single report out of HUD or Carson himself? Seems to be a wall of silence.
 
2017-11-09 07:08:44 PM  

Bith Set Me Up: We're almost at this point in the Trek timeline:

[img.fark.net image 692x530]

/Subby


Funny you should mention that...
 
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