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(USA Today)   Bob Costas claims football destroys people's brains, posits effects on players may be even worse   ( usatoday.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, American football, broadcaster Bob Costas, Michael Wilbon, 2007 NFL season, American sportswriters, football, Broadcasting of sports events, NFL hot seat  
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318 clicks; posted to Sports » on 08 Nov 2017 at 3:20 PM (13 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-11-08 03:28:44 PM  

"The reality is that this game destroys people's brains," he said Tuesday night.


And he's right. And we know he's right. It's been a running joke for decades - just ask every comedian who's ever imitated a football player as a mentally challenged fool. We knew for a very long time that football causes traumatic brain injuries. We just didn't know that the NFL knew and spent buttloads of money trying to cover it up.

But do you know what? Most Americans don't care.

It's been a blood sport for a very long time. Players are injured, crippled, even killed playing it, but we deemed the losses acceptable because that's what happens in a sport advertised on a regular basis as "gladiatorial." They've grown up on vicarious suffering as entertainment - Big Brother, American Idol, The Voice - and, hey, if they didn't know before, the NFL players certainly know now, so if they choose to play football, well, that's on them, innit?
 
2017-11-08 03:52:27 PM  

FormlessOne: just ask every comedian who's ever imitated a football player as a mentally challenged fool.


Bob Nelson Football Routine - Funniest standup act EVER!
Youtube BerJdS2VJhA
 
2017-11-08 04:01:49 PM  
Certainly would explain the, ahem, astute and brilliant observances often found in the concussion-ball threads.
 
2017-11-08 04:33:51 PM  

FormlessOne: "The reality is that this game destroys people's brains," he said Tuesday night.
And he's right. And we know he's right. It's been a running joke for decades - just ask every comedian who's ever imitated a football player as a mentally challenged fool. We knew for a very long time that football causes traumatic brain injuries. We just didn't know that the NFL knew and spent buttloads of money trying to cover it up.

But do you know what? Most Americans don't care.

It's been a blood sport for a very long time. Players are injured, crippled, even killed playing it, but we deemed the losses acceptable because that's what happens in a sport advertised on a regular basis as "gladiatorial." They've grown up on vicarious suffering as entertainment - Big Brother, American Idol, The Voice - and, hey, if they didn't know before, the NFL players certainly know now, so if they choose to play football, well, that's on them, innit?


How many are killed?
Since the 90's:  0.40 per 100,000 high school football players died from on-field injuries. Most deaths are related to heat-stroke or water intoxication. The peak of HS football player deaths was in 1968. There are approximately 12 football related deaths per year nationwide, with non-blunt force injuries accounting for double those of their counterpart (8 to 4). 

Also since the 90s there are an estimated 1.2 million football related injuries year round. 39% are strains/sprains, 25% are bruises, 15% are dislocations, 10% are fractures, and 5% are concussions.

Sticking to HS, per 10,000 practices/games 11.2 have had concussions in football. Lacrosse 12.1, Soccer 10.9, Wrestling 6.2, basketball 8.4, field hockey 4.2, baseball 2.8.

NCAA Self Reported Concussion Stats: (expressed as percent of all players)
Women's Ice Hockey: 20.9 One Concussion, 8.3 multiple
Men's Wrestling: 19.5 for One, 8.2 multiple
Men's Ice Hockey: 18.6, 7.1
Football: 17.9, 9.5
Men's Lacrosse: 17.8, 7.8
Men's Soccer: 16.8, 6.4
Women's Field Hockey: 15.2, 6.0
Women's Soccer: 13.9, 7.1


So please, continue to tell us how this is a problem only related to football and how football is the new demon of injuries when it results in less injuries compared to other sports. 

Sport of any kind has risk. Contact sports have more risk. You have approximately a 1 in 50,000 chance in dying from injury in football. 1 in 1000 for moto racing, 1 in 100 for GP racing, and 1 in 6700 from dying in a car accident.

Football will continue to improve their gear/rules and continue to lower injuries (it's on a downward trend, not upward). Meanwhile all of the other sports that aren't getting as much attention are seeing little change in their injury rates.
 
2017-11-08 04:59:05 PM  
Warrior Code...
 
2017-11-08 05:05:10 PM  
Hah, Jokes on your Subby- Football fans don't know what posits means.
 
2017-11-08 05:05:45 PM  
oh look roger goodell's wife is here to tell us that sitting on your couch is more dangerous than bashing into other large human beings for years and years at a time
 
2017-11-08 05:14:50 PM  
My cats opinion on the future of the NFL? Yeah, worth as much as Bob Costas.
 
2017-11-08 05:35:31 PM  
Listening to Bob Costas destroys peoples brains.

/He's right this time.
 
2017-11-08 05:36:05 PM  
The brain hitting the inside of the skull can cause major trauma or repeated minor trauma, this is something everybody knows or should know at this point but there's really nothing we can do other than to ask players to sign off on this once they become of legal age. I do think kids should never ever suit up and play tackle football, at its core football is a game of spacing and tackle football at younger ages means absolutely nothing. Flag football is more than enough for kids, it's still all about spacing and the lack of hitting means a greater emphasis on the mental aspect of the game. They can put a helmet on later in life.
 
2017-11-08 06:03:46 PM  
That wasn't a Bob Costas report. There wasn't enough about how the tragic life of the athlete lead them to become the top of their competitive field.  And how they should win, especially if they are competing against foreigners, because American tragedy is more poignant.

/Fark you, Bob Costas.
//I hope you get North Korean pink-eye this year.
 
2017-11-08 06:23:54 PM  

phimuskapsi: FormlessOne: "The reality is that this game destroys people's brains," he said Tuesday night.
And he's right. And we know he's right. It's been a running joke for decades - just ask every comedian who's ever imitated a football player as a mentally challenged fool. We knew for a very long time that football causes traumatic brain injuries. We just didn't know that the NFL knew and spent buttloads of money trying to cover it up.

But do you know what? Most Americans don't care.

It's been a blood sport for a very long time. Players are injured, crippled, even killed playing it, but we deemed the losses acceptable because that's what happens in a sport advertised on a regular basis as "gladiatorial." They've grown up on vicarious suffering as entertainment - Big Brother, American Idol, The Voice - and, hey, if they didn't know before, the NFL players certainly know now, so if they choose to play football, well, that's on them, innit?

How many are killed?
Since the 90's:  0.40 per 100,000 high school football players died from on-field injuries. Most deaths are related to heat-stroke or water intoxication. The peak of HS football player deaths was in 1968. There are approximately 12 football related deaths per year nationwide, with non-blunt force injuries accounting for double those of their counterpart (8 to 4). 

Also since the 90s there are an estimated 1.2 million football related injuries year round. 39% are strains/sprains, 25% are bruises, 15% are dislocations, 10% are fractures, and 5% are concussions.

Sticking to HS, per 10,000 practices/games 11.2 have had concussions in football. Lacrosse 12.1, Soccer 10.9, Wrestling 6.2, basketball 8.4, field hockey 4.2, baseball 2.8.

NCAA Self Reported Concussion Stats: (expressed as percent of all players)
Women's Ice Hockey: 20.9 One Concussion, 8.3 multiple
Men's Wrestling: 19.5 for One, 8.2 multiple
Men's Ice Hockey: 18.6, 7.1
Football: 17.9, 9.5
Men's Lacrosse: 17.8, 7.8
Men's Soccer: 16.8, 6.4
Women's Field Hockey: 15.2, 6.0
Women's Soccer: 13.9, 7.1


So please, continue to tell us how this is a problem only related to football and how football is the new demon of injuries when it results in less injuries compared to other sports. 

Sport of any kind has risk. Contact sports have more risk. You have approximately a 1 in 50,000 chance in dying from injury in football. 1 in 1000 for moto racing, 1 in 100 for GP racing, and 1 in 6700 from dying in a car accident.

Football will continue to improve their gear/rules and continue to lower injuries (it's on a downward trend, not upward). Meanwhile all of the other sports that aren't getting as much attention are seeing little change in their injury rates.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-11-08 06:31:42 PM  
Im sure Costas will do the right thing like Howard Cosell did when he realized boxing was hard on people and quit announcing games or taking money from the sport.
 
2017-11-08 06:54:06 PM  

phimuskapsi: <Long-winded "It's OK because other folks do it, too" excuse.>


And here's a prime example, folks, of exactly about what I'm talking. It's easy to find people happy to utter tripe like this - that it's perfectly acceptable for people to enjoy chronic, traumatic brain damage because other sports also have similar issues - but, see, they don't.

We're not finding the sheer numbers of CTE in other sports that we're seeing in NFL football, as well as high school & college football, because "chronic traumatic encephalopathy" is not synonymous with "concussion" - concussions are certainly contributive, obviously, but the canard that "other sports have lots of concussions, too, so they're just as bad as football" is silly because it's not just the "reported concussions", but the constant (and unreported) brain trauma that occurs during normal play in NFL football. Even sports with similar rules & play aren't seeing a history of CTE cases as drastic as NFL football. Only recently have CTE cases in soccer and rugby have been identified, and we're talking "first identified case", not "decades of identified and covered-up cases."

The amusing part is that I agree with some of what you said, but not in the way, I expect, you'd want - other sports do, indeed, also have this problem. Ice hockey, rugby, and just about any other sport with encouraged, repeated brain trauma is going to end up with the stigma of CTE branded on them. The problem is that the organization responsible for this particular sport knew for rather a long time that this was a problem, and did its damnedest to cover it up instead of spending that money on helping people and mitigating the problem. "NFL football" isn't the problem - "the NFL cover up of brain trauma in NFL football" is the problem. The best part of having this hung around the necks of the NFL is the high visibility and stigma is forcing other sports to take a long look at brain trauma.

If we're very lucky, we'll see many of the sports that you quoted also change their rules and gear to deal with this - eventually, if all goes well, you won't be able to trot out this tired canard and exclaim that "it's OK because other sports are bad, too, so stop blaming football for all of it" any more. We'll see headgear improve and other sports require it to prevent brain trauma. Heck, we may see some of the more brutal sports discontinued entirely.

We need to stop feeding our kids to an industry that makes book at their expense.
 
2017-11-08 06:58:48 PM  

mikaloyd: Im sure Costas will do the right thing like Howard Cosell did when he realized boxing was hard on people and quit announcing games or taking money from the sport.


Quite possibly. Cosell's stand against the brutality of those fights was unheard of at the time, and his protest did quite a bit to change boxing. It'd be nice to see Bob Costas just say, "I can't in good conscience do this any longer" during an NFL broadcast and walk off the job.
 
2017-11-08 07:15:34 PM  

FormlessOne: mikaloyd: Im sure Costas will do the right thing like Howard Cosell did when he realized boxing was hard on people and quit announcing games or taking money from the sport.

Quite possibly. Cosell's stand against the brutality of those fights was unheard of at the time, and his protest did quite a bit to change boxing. It'd be nice to see Bob Costas just say, "I can't in good conscience do this any longer" during an NFL broadcast and walk off the job.


By the end of the Muhammad Ali/Larry Holmes fight, in which Larry Holmes pummeled an old Muhammad Ali who was probably already showing signs of Parkinson's, Howard Cosell would just say what round it is, then he was silent the rest of the round.  He never called another fight after that, because he was so disgusted with it.

The 30 for 30 doc "Muhammad and Larry", which combines footage  of Holmes' and Ali's training camps in the run-up to the fight shot by the Maysles Brothers for a documentary that got shelfed with new interviews, is just amazing.  It's equal parts heartbreaking and infuriating.
 
2017-11-08 07:18:43 PM  
My son played and then he was "I like my brain" and he stopped, this was right after he won an award but he looked at his own concussion plus all of the ones for his teammates and said he was done.  He played linebacker but was also the kicker and punter and I still remember the night he was back to punt and the offensive line (decimated by injuries) let three guys just blow by and smash my son to the ground.  There he was laying out on the field not sure where he was as the staff took him off (to the coaches credit he pulled him for the rest of the year even after he was "OK").

My wife and I didn't want him to play but we did not want to forbid him, we explained the issues and let him make the choice as he needs to as he grows up.  He later understood our concerns and made the choice himself.  We could have forbidden him, it unfortunately would not have meant so much as that one hit.  I think when we talk to him about other dangerous things he will be way more receptive.
 
2017-11-08 07:23:06 PM  

jake_lex: By the end of the Muhammad Ali/Larry Holmes fight, in which Larry Holmes pummeled an old Muhammad Ali who was probably already showing signs of Parkinson's, Howard Cosell would just say what round it is, then he was silent the rest of the round.  He never called another fight after that, because he was so disgusted with it.


Actually, his last pro fight was Holmes vs. Tex Cobb in 1982 (though he did the Olympics in '84, but that's amateur boxing).
 
2017-11-08 07:30:01 PM  

FormlessOne: It'd be nice to see Bob Costas just say, "I can't in good conscience do this any longer" during an NFL broadcast and walk off the job.


It'll never happen. Costa$ love$ being an attention whore.
 
2017-11-08 08:22:48 PM  

buckeyebrain: jake_lex: By the end of the Muhammad Ali/Larry Holmes fight, in which Larry Holmes pummeled an old Muhammad Ali who was probably already showing signs of Parkinson's, Howard Cosell would just say what round it is, then he was silent the rest of the round.  He never called another fight after that, because he was so disgusted with it.

Actually, his last pro fight was Holmes vs. Tex Cobb in 1982 (though he did the Olympics in '84, but that's amateur boxing).


I still marvel at Cobb's ability to take a beating. Holmes beat the ever loving shiat out of him in that fight, but dude would just not quit.
 
rka
2017-11-08 08:55:35 PM  

FormlessOne: just ask every comedian who's ever imitated a football player as a mentally challenged fool.


Brain trauma was not the reason for the joke. Being stupid in general was the joke.
 
rka
2017-11-08 09:05:01 PM  

AdamK: The brain hitting the inside of the skull can cause major trauma or repeated minor trauma, this is something everybody knows or should know at this point but there's really nothing we can do other than to ask players to sign off on this once they become of legal age. I do think kids should never ever suit up and play tackle football, at its core football is a game of spacing and tackle football at younger ages means absolutely nothing. Flag football is more than enough for kids, it's still all about spacing and the lack of hitting means a greater emphasis on the mental aspect of the game. They can put a helmet on later in life.


People knew smoking was bad too, but Congress still passed laws strictly limiting the tobacco industry's ability to advertise and to market to kids. The NFL ain't got nothing on the tobacco lobby's deep pockets either. The NFL's revenue is 15-16 billion? The tobacco industry's PROFITS are twice that. And that's after being hounded over the past 20-30 years.

And even with that money, they're about one step above dog fighting and child molestors as far as respectable industries.

That's the NFL's nightmare scenario future.
 
2017-11-08 09:14:40 PM  
Well, it's certainly true that the parts of the country where high school football is most popular are also rife with the kind of brain damaged people who support Trump.
 
2017-11-09 12:07:45 AM  

FormlessOne: phimuskapsi: <Long-winded "It's OK because other folks do it, too" excuse.>

And here's a prime example, folks, of exactly about what I'm talking. It's easy to find people happy to utter tripe like this - that it's perfectly acceptable for people to enjoy chronic, traumatic brain damage because other sports also have similar issues - but, see, they don't.

We're not finding the sheer numbers of CTE in other sports that we're seeing in NFL football, as well as high school & college football, because "chronic traumatic encephalopathy" is not synonymous with "concussion" - concussions are certainly contributive, obviously, but the canard that "other sports have lots of concussions, too, so they're just as bad as football" is silly because it's not just the "reported concussions", but the constant (and unreported) brain trauma that occurs during normal play in NFL football. Even sports with similar rules & play aren't seeing a history of CTE cases as drastic as NFL football. Only recently have CTE cases in soccer and rugby have been identified, and we're talking "first identified case", not "decades of identified and covered-up cases."

The amusing part is that I agree with some of what you said, but not in the way, I expect, you'd want - other sports do, indeed, also have this problem. Ice hockey, rugby, and just about any other sport with encouraged, repeated brain trauma is going to end up with the stigma of CTE branded on them. The problem is that the organization responsible for this particular sport knew for rather a long time that this was a problem, and did its damnedest to cover it up instead of spending that money on helping people and mitigating the problem. "NFL football" isn't the problem - "the NFL cover up of brain trauma in NFL football" is the problem. The best part of having this hung around the necks of the NFL is the high visibility and stigma is forcing other sports to take a long look at brain trauma.

If we're very lucky, we'll see many of the sports that you quoted also change their rules and gear to deal with this - eventually, if all goes well, you won't be able to trot out this tired canard and exclaim that "it's OK because other sports are bad, too, so stop blaming football for all of it" any more. We'll see headgear improve and other sports require it to prevent brain trauma. Heck, we may see some of the more brutal sports discontinued entirely.

We need to stop feeding our kids to an industry that makes book at their expense.


You make some fine points but the 'we're not seeing the sheer number of CTE in other sports' is not one of them.

Which goes to the point I've been harping on for a couple of years: We need a much larger scale study with a control. Way too much self selection. We need to know a lot more about the rest of the population for non athletes as well as athletes who play sports other than football. We know CTE is bad. We know lots of football players get CTE. We don't know if older further players who don't show symptoms also have CTE but don't decline mentally. We don't know the incidence of CTE in the non athletes population. CTE is a serious thing for sure but we need some more info to put it in perspective.
 
2017-11-09 01:30:49 AM  

FormlessOne: phimuskapsi: <Long-winded "It's OK because other folks do it, too" excuse.>


My point was that there is risk in everything, and wasn't a comparison game or as you call it "a long-winded 'It's ok because other people do it' excuse". My other point was that football as it pertains to safety in rules and game time equipment has changed drastically from the time that I played football or that even current NFL athletes did as kids. Players in their 30's for example played with much worse gear as kids as compared to kids now. 

When you get to college and professional levels there are known risks. The players play for specific reasons and are free to stop whenever they want, and many do after college. The same risk that a race car driver takes when he gets behind the wheel of a dangerous machine; or going to war; or doing many other dangerous things - many things that people do for money. Concussions were hidden, sure, but they certainly aren't now and people continue to play. Flag football should be the target for younger kids and tackle later in HS. Changes will continue to be made until it's the safest it can be. Other sports will then have to do their own catching up.

I continue to hold that in relation to other sports the NFL is demonized more because of the visibility and popularity of the sport. I accept that players injure themselves while playing the game sometimes, and I sympathize when it happens - but I don't hate the sport because of it. I watch extreme sports too, and sometimes those guys eat it horribly when trying to do something purely for the spectacle as well. Just as I watch combat sports. They made the choice, if they are cool with it, then so am I.
 
2017-11-09 08:15:06 AM  

JohnBigBootay: You make some fine points but the 'we're not seeing the sheer number of CTE in other sports' is not one of them.

Which goes to the point I've been harping on for a couple of years: We need a much larger scale study with a control. Way too much self selection. We need to know a lot more about the rest of the population for non athletes as well as athletes who play sports other than football. We know CTE is bad. We know lots of football players get CTE. We don't know if older further players who don't show symptoms also have CTE but don't decline mentally. We don't know the incidence of CTE in the non athletes population. CTE is a serious thing for sure but we need some more info to put it in perspective.


Isn't that how Omalu first discovered CTE though? Webster's brain was extremely abnormal vs. general population, showing a combination of alzheimers and car-crash trauma while still being healthy brain matter?

Anyways, the problem for the NFL vs. other sports is that head hitting happens hundreds of times per game and is almost impossible to remove from the game without obliterating the sport as we know it, whereas other sports (rugby aside) can mitigate the issue.
 
2017-11-09 09:56:22 AM  

AdamK: JohnBigBootay: You make some fine points but the 'we're not seeing the sheer number of CTE in other sports' is not one of them.

Which goes to the point I've been harping on for a couple of years: We need a much larger scale study with a control. Way too much self selection. We need to know a lot more about the rest of the population for non athletes as well as athletes who play sports other than football. We know CTE is bad. We know lots of football players get CTE. We don't know if older further players who don't show symptoms also have CTE but don't decline mentally. We don't know the incidence of CTE in the non athletes population. CTE is a serious thing for sure but we need some more info to put it in perspective.

Isn't that how Omalu first discovered CTE though? Webster's brain was extremely abnormal vs. general population, showing a combination of alzheimers and car-crash trauma while still being healthy brain matter?

Anyways, the problem for the NFL vs. other sports is that head hitting happens hundreds of times per game and is almost impossible to remove from the game without obliterating the sport as we know it,


The offense/defense has maybe 60-80 plays over a course of a game, not all players hit heads every play either. Webster's brain was abnormal in that it looked like he was on the path to alzheimer's or dementia at 50, but remember that this guy played through the 70's and 80's - not exactly a safe era to play in both equipment wise and the fact that a lot of guys were juicing.

whereas other sports (rugby aside) can mitigate the issue.

You think hockey is gonna get rid of checking or fighting? What about soccer, think they'll remove heading the ball? Probably not. How would you mitigate those?

Concussions are an issue as is CTE, but I'd be willing to bet that as we see new players come in and old players age out, that the occurrence of both decreases due to exposure to newer equipment and rules as time goes on during their playing time. E.g. a kid starting now, with the best equipment - are they as likely to have CTE later? We have no idea.

Science will need more data, as I feel the current results are skewed a bit by both player age and circumstances of brain donation. I think that because the NFL is a game of numbers, it might not be as prevalent as we think, each team has 52 players, but only 22 play in a game. Are backups going to have the same level of damage as a star? No. Why do some players age better / healthier later in life? E.g. Anyone on broadcast teams or just living out a normal life after football. 

So many questions and not enough answers.
 
2017-11-09 12:29:39 PM  

phimuskapsi: AdamK: JohnBigBootay: You make some fine points but the 'we're not seeing the sheer number of CTE in other sports' is not one of them.

Which goes to the point I've been harping on for a couple of years: We need a much larger scale study with a control. Way too much self selection. We need to know a lot more about the rest of the population for non athletes as well as athletes who play sports other than football. We know CTE is bad. We know lots of football players get CTE. We don't know if older further players who don't show symptoms also have CTE but don't decline mentally. We don't know the incidence of CTE in the non athletes population. CTE is a serious thing for sure but we need some more info to put it in perspective.

Isn't that how Omalu first discovered CTE though? Webster's brain was extremely abnormal vs. general population, showing a combination of alzheimers and car-crash trauma while still being healthy brain matter?

Anyways, the problem for the NFL vs. other sports is that head hitting happens hundreds of times per game and is almost impossible to remove from the game without obliterating the sport as we know it,

The offense/defense has maybe 60-80 plays over a course of a game, not all players hit heads every play either. Webster's brain was abnormal in that it looked like he was on the path to alzheimer's or dementia at 50, but remember that this guy played through the 70's and 80's - not exactly a safe era to play in both equipment wise and the fact that a lot of guys were juicing.

whereas other sports (rugby aside) can mitigate the issue.

You think hockey is gonna get rid of checking or fighting? What about soccer, think they'll remove heading the ball? Probably not. How would you mitigate those?

Concussions are an issue as is CTE, but I'd be willing to bet that as we see new players come in and old players age out, that the occurrence of both decreases due to exposure to newer equipment and rules as time goes on during their playing time. ...


We already know the science of concussions though, it's an internal swelling of the brain, when the brain heals it leaves behind plaque which can become permanent if not given time to heal properly. A large concussive hit - the ones that knock people out - typically leave a single large area of plaque, however the unique problem that the NFL has is the accumulation of small amounts of plaque in the brain from sub-concussive hits that don't knock people out but eventually strangle the brain. Obviously everybody is affected differently, some people are more prone to major concussions than others and much like other injuries everybody's brain trauma will be slightly different depending on where or how the brain hits inside the skull, how much fluid there is, whether they already suffered issues, where in the brain structure the swelling occurs, etc. This accumulation of small amounts of plaque has yet to be found in the brains of other people outside of boxing.

In hockey yes they've been discouraging glass checking and goons are basically a thing of the past for the most part. In soccer they're talking about discouraging headers to prevent collisions. I don't think it's possible to remove collisions in tackle football, so it's something that people will just have to sign off on and mitigate the big hits as a thing of the past.
 
2017-11-09 01:23:18 PM  

AdamK: however the unique problem that the NFL has is the accumulation of small amounts of plaque in the brain from sub-concussive hits that don't knock people out but eventually strangle the brain.


Word. This is the NFL's biggest problem. Everyone is hyper-focused on concussions and helmet to helmet. That's NOT the NFL's biggest problem. The NFL's biggest problem is the sport as it is played involves collisions of some kind for almost every player multiple times per game. I think the evidence is going to say you can get CTE without having any concussions at all. I don't think it's possible to design a helmet that substantially mitigates what is happening to your brain inside your skull when you have a collision with another player hundreds and thousands of times over a football life. I liken it to hearing damage - it's cumulative and permanent. Sure a concussion can fark up your brain in one hit just like an m-80 going off next to your ear can blow your ear drum. But you can get to the same place with a a lifetime of factory work and not wearing hearing protection.
 
2017-11-09 05:53:07 PM  

JohnBigBootay: AdamK: however the unique problem that the NFL has is the accumulation of small amounts of plaque in the brain from sub-concussive hits that don't knock people out but eventually strangle the brain.

Word. This is the NFL's biggest problem. Everyone is hyper-focused on concussions and helmet to helmet. That's NOT the NFL's biggest problem. The NFL's biggest problem is the sport as it is played involves collisions of some kind for almost every player multiple times per game. I think the evidence is going to say you can get CTE without having any concussions at all. I don't think it's possible to design a helmet that substantially mitigates what is happening to your brain inside your skull when you have a collision with another player hundreds and thousands of times over a football life. I liken it to hearing damage - it's cumulative and permanent. Sure a concussion can fark up your brain in one hit just like an m-80 going off next to your ear can blow your ear drum. But you can get to the same place with a a lifetime of factory work and not wearing hearing protection.


If that's really the case then jobs where you are exposed to repeated concussive blows, say mining or construction or the military, I wonder what the existence of CTE is those situations

I've had 5 concussions in my life. 1 KO at age 10 for about 5 minutes, 3 really hard hits snowboarding and once knocking myself out on a sprinkler system (dumb story) - so I worry about it myself on occasion.
 
2017-11-09 06:04:23 PM  

phimuskapsi: JohnBigBootay: AdamK: however the unique problem that the NFL has is the accumulation of small amounts of plaque in the brain from sub-concussive hits that don't knock people out but eventually strangle the brain.

Word. This is the NFL's biggest problem. Everyone is hyper-focused on concussions and helmet to helmet. That's NOT the NFL's biggest problem. The NFL's biggest problem is the sport as it is played involves collisions of some kind for almost every player multiple times per game. I think the evidence is going to say you can get CTE without having any concussions at all. I don't think it's possible to design a helmet that substantially mitigates what is happening to your brain inside your skull when you have a collision with another player hundreds and thousands of times over a football life. I liken it to hearing damage - it's cumulative and permanent. Sure a concussion can fark up your brain in one hit just like an m-80 going off next to your ear can blow your ear drum. But you can get to the same place with a a lifetime of factory work and not wearing hearing protection.

If that's really the case then jobs where you are exposed to repeated concussive blows, say mining or construction or the military, I wonder what the existence of CTE is those situations

I've had 5 concussions in my life. 1 KO at age 10 for about 5 minutes, 3 really hard hits snowboarding and once knocking myself out on a sprinkler system (dumb story) - so I worry about it myself on occasion.


I've been KO'd a few times and also got a big concussion while snowboarding last year myself, from my understanding it's best to just treat it as if you were sick - minimal stimulation of senses, stay inside, don't jostle your brain, etc. The general rule of thumb with noticeable concussions is you don't want to get concussed again for weeks or even months or else the damage can be permanent and each concussion after that will be more severe.

The main issue for athletes is timing, they resume play before it's safe basically - these guys also have to have the attitude of pushing through pain I mean everybody is banged up a month into a season so it's not seen as an excuse. That's why concussion knowledge is important is for these guys not to ignore it.
 
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