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(NYPost)   Pepsi's tone-deaf commercial with Kendall Jenner is one of the worst commercials of all time. Coca-Cola: hold my beer   ( nypost.com) divider line
    More: Stupid, Saudi Arabia, Coca-Cola, Arabian Peninsula, new Coca-Cola ad, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Saudi Arabian woman, Riyadh  
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3639 clicks; posted to Business » on 06 Nov 2017 at 5:10 PM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



25 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-11-06 03:51:30 PM  
it's not wonderful but it's not going to steal Pepsi's Oscar for "Tone Deaf Pile of Steaming Rat Turds"
 
2017-11-06 05:24:46 PM  
...Bill Cosby slipping some roofies into a Coke bottle so Kevin Spacey can sexually assault it while Harvey Weinstein beats off into a potted plant in the background?
 
2017-11-06 05:34:23 PM  
Meh, this isn't even on the same level as the Pepsi commercial.  Yes, it feels a little opportunistic given recent developments.  But if you can get past that, it is actually kind of a cute experience of a father teaching his daughter to drive for the first time while attempting to make it feel universal and inclusive.
 
2017-11-06 05:36:52 PM  
Pepsi was all but parodying police in riot gear brutalizing peaceful protestors--something that's still happening. Coke heavily sugar-coats the underlying issue (women were forbidden to drive because Saudi Arabia is an awful country unless your an oil-rich Prince) but it's not offensive on its face.
 
2017-11-06 05:39:25 PM  
I dunno.  That Prius commercial a few years back was twenty kinds of awful.

l7world.comView Full Size


Who IS this?  WHAT is this?  WHY is this?  Who is responsible?  WHY?  WHY?  WHYYYYYYY????
 
2017-11-06 05:44:53 PM  
Seems like a perfectly fine ad to me. Just goes to show, people will get outraged over anything these days.
 
2017-11-06 05:45:23 PM  

rjakobi: I dunno.  That Prius commercial a few years back was twenty kinds of awful.

[l7world.com image 470x262]

Who IS this?  WHAT is this?  WHY is this?  Who is responsible?  WHY?  WHY?  WHYYYYYYY????


Sexiest commercial ever.
 
2017-11-06 05:47:03 PM  
Meh. The "showing the kid how to drive" narrative is well tread in every nation where that's a normal thing. That's their reality now, so I don't see what the problem is.
 
2017-11-06 05:57:30 PM  

v2micca: Meh, this isn't even on the same level as the Pepsi commercial.  Yes, it feels a little opportunistic given recent developments.  But if you can get past that, it is actually kind of a cute experience of a father teaching his daughter to drive for the first time while attempting to make it feel universal and inclusive.


That. Pepsi's message was essentially "police brutality can be overlooked if we just come together over shared love of sugar water," while Coke's message is "Saudi women can now learn to drive, and they should do it while buzzed by sugar water." The former minimizes the issue while the latter ostensibly celebrates it, in a blatantly shilling manner.
 
2017-11-06 06:29:39 PM  

v2micca: Meh, this isn't even on the same level as the Pepsi commercial.  Yes, it feels a little opportunistic given recent developments.  But if you can get past that, it is actually kind of a cute experience of a father teaching his daughter to drive for the first time while attempting to make it feel universal and inclusive.


I presumed it was his wife.  Was that wrong?  Should I not have done that?
 
2017-11-06 06:33:21 PM  
The two ads are far from comparable, I think it's fine.
 
2017-11-06 06:45:03 PM  
OF ALL TIME!
 
2017-11-06 06:54:23 PM  

ElectricPeterTork: ...Bill Cosby slipping some roofies into a Coke bottle so Kevin Spacey can sexually assault it while Harvey Weinstein beats off into a potted plant in the background?


Your brain is one hella scary place.
 
2017-11-06 07:08:02 PM  
I'm more bothered by the current VW commercial that co-opts Woodstock to frame VW as the car company that really, really cares about people and their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being, and since that's also the kind of person you are, you should be driving a VW.

This from the company that willfully poisoned people with exhaust emissions just so it could brag about the performance numbers of its diesels.
 
2017-11-06 07:08:53 PM  
 
2017-11-06 07:18:13 PM  

czetie: I'm more bothered by the current VW commercial that co-opts Woodstock to frame VW as the car company that really, really cares about people and their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being, and since that's also the kind of person you are, you should be driving a VW.

This from the company that willfully poisoned people with exhaust emissions just so it could brag about the performance numbers of its diesels.


Or, it's simply because the Volkswagon Beetle and Bus were extremely popular in 1969, especially with the demographic that would have gone to Woodstock.
 
2017-11-06 07:42:18 PM  
I find it hard to believe that people don't realize that the marketing execs at Coke and Pepsi know exactly what they're doing with these types of ads.

The ad isn't the ad. The controversy/outrage is the ad. And the media outlets (and Fark) give them more exposure than they could ever dream of. For free.
 
2017-11-06 09:11:28 PM  
Wish they'd bring back "The Holidays are Coming" commercials.....
 
2017-11-06 09:39:48 PM  
Coke Zero is gone forever, so it doesn't even matter anymore. Nothing matters anymore.
 
kab
2017-11-06 11:39:00 PM  
It's dumb and lame, but not outrage worthy.   Then again, social media would simply stop being used entirely if there wasn't something in existence to get poutraged over.
 
2017-11-07 07:19:04 AM  

kab: It's dumb and lame, but not outrage worthy.   Then again, social media would simply stop being used entirely if there wasn't something in existence to get poutraged over.


Dilly, dilly!
 
2017-11-07 07:45:20 AM  

Adebisi: The ad isn't the ad. The controversy/outrage is the ad. And the media outlets (and Fark) give them more exposure than they could ever dream of. For free.


I continue to be amazed that people still post this sentiment that has not been true for at least 60 years. There really is such a thing as bad publicity -- as threads on Fark itself about the negative consequences of bad publicity constantly demonstrate.

Look, companies like Coca Cola and Pepsi are profoundly protective of their brand image. In some cases, it's about all they have to distinguish their product. When people are saying bad things about the company or product, that isn't carefully orchestrated outrage for free publicity* -- that's a monumental cock-up.

Rule of thumb: if we're talking about the product, the ad succeeded. If we're talking about the brand, the ad maybe-succeeded. If we're talking about the ad, the ad failed.

*Exception allowed for products that deliberately court a brand image of being "bad boy" or "edgy", but even in those cases the amount of offense is carefully calculated, and constantly risks going too far.
 
2017-11-07 10:57:28 AM  

czetie: Adebisi: The ad isn't the ad. The controversy/outrage is the ad. And the media outlets (and Fark) give them more exposure than they could ever dream of. For free.

I continue to be amazed that people still post this sentiment that has not been true for at least 60 years. There really is such a thing as bad publicity -- as threads on Fark itself about the negative consequences of bad publicity constantly demonstrate.

Look, companies like Coca Cola and Pepsi are profoundly protective of their brand image. In some cases, it's about all they have to distinguish their product. When people are saying bad things about the company or product, that isn't carefully orchestrated outrage for free publicity* -- that's a monumental cock-up.

Rule of thumb: if we're talking about the product, the ad succeeded. If we're talking about the brand, the ad maybe-succeeded. If we're talking about the ad, the ad failed.

*Exception allowed for products that deliberately court a brand image of being "bad boy" or "edgy", but even in those cases the amount of offense is carefully calculated, and constantly risks going too far.


Pepsi's "Oops, We Missed The Mark" ad campaign ran in April 2017. If what you said was correct, we'd see real-world negative consequences for the company. In Q2, the North American Beverage division of PepsiCo, the one that would be most significantly impacted by the "bad press", reported an increase in operating profit by 1 percentage point.

I'd say their campaign was a success and, accordingly Coke is now following suit.
 
2017-11-07 06:30:27 PM  

Adebisi: Pepsi's "Oops, We Missed The Mark" ad campaign ran in April 2017. If what you said was correct, we'd see real-world negative consequences for the company. In Q2, the North American Beverage division of PepsiCo, the one that would be most significantly impacted by the "bad press", reported an increase in operating profit by 1 percentage point.


In that period, "Organic volume rose 2% for snacks and other food but fell 2% for beverages." Also, "Pepsi has tightened up its pricing, which can help protect revenue and make up for weaker volumes. But that tactic's durability could become a bigger issue over time."

...and in Q3, "PepsiCo earnings top estimates even as North America beverage sales disappoint". From the same source:

"Ultimately, cost cutting and productivity improvements allowed the company to outpace Wall Street's earnings expectations, but revenue fell short... The North American beverage business generated revenue of $5.33 billion in the quarter, versus $5.52 billion the year-earlier period. Its operating profit dropped 10 percent, to $817 million from $904 million." [Emphasis added].

I'm going to be generous and assume you know the difference between revenue and operating profit, but simply couldn't find a revenue number that supported your position.

I'd say their campaign was a success and, accordingly Coke is now following suit.

You and I have very different definitions of "success"...
 
2017-11-07 07:50:49 PM  

czetie: Adebisi: Pepsi's "Oops, We Missed The Mark" ad campaign ran in April 2017. If what you said was correct, we'd see real-world negative consequences for the company. In Q2, the North American Beverage division of PepsiCo, the one that would be most significantly impacted by the "bad press", reported an increase in operating profit by 1 percentage point.

In that period, "Organic volume rose 2% for snacks and other food but fell 2% for beverages." Also, "Pepsi has tightened up its pricing, which can help protect revenue and make up for weaker volumes. But that tactic's durability could become a bigger issue over time."

...and in Q3, "PepsiCo earnings top estimates even as North America beverage sales disappoint". From the same source:

"Ultimately, cost cutting and productivity improvements allowed the company to outpace Wall Street's earnings expectations, but revenue fell short... The North American beverage business generated revenue of $5.33 billion in the quarter, versus $5.52 billion the year-earlier period. Its operating profit dropped 10 percent, to $817 million from $904 million." [Emphasis added].

I'm going to be generous and assume you know the difference between revenue and operating profit, but simply couldn't find a revenue number that supported your position.

I'd say their campaign was a success and, accordingly Coke is now following suit.

You and I have very different definitions of "success"...


You conveniently left this quote out of your source: "U.S. soda sales more broadly have fallen for 12 straight years". Which, of course means that they're looking for profit in other ways, namely, as you mentioned "cost cutting and productivity improvements".

Kinda like cutting your marketing budget and letting media/social media do your marketing for you? All the while increasing overall profit despite declining revenue? Seems like a good strategy to me. Coke seems to think so too.
 
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