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(Planet F1)   Honda F1: We're not happy with Alonso. He said our engine was crap   ( planetf1.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, Formula One, boss Yusuke Hasegawa, Jenson Button, 2008 Singapore Grand Prix, Renault F1, 2008 Australian Grand Prix, Scuderia Ferrari, 2006 Formula One season  
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518 clicks; posted to Sports » on 17 Oct 2017 at 1:10 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



14 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-10-17 11:51:35 AM  
Truth hurts
 
2017-10-17 12:29:59 PM  
Tough.
 
2017-10-17 12:39:51 PM  
It's not "crap" it's "Unicorn Farts."
 
2017-10-17 01:19:43 PM  
And in the article:
But Hasegawa can understand his anger and has taken no offence from his comments about Honda.
"No, not at all. Alonso criticised us because he was not satisfied, he had every right to do it," he added.
 
2017-10-17 01:35:35 PM  
When a 2 time world champion you are paying 40 million a year says your engine is crap, YOUR ENGINE IS CRAP.
 
2017-10-17 01:49:05 PM  

Blues_X: And in the article:
But Hasegawa can understand his anger and has taken no offence from his comments about Honda.
"No, not at all. Alonso criticised us because he was not satisfied, he had every right to do it," he added.


I didn't click the link, but that title is definitely the kind of stupid editorialized BS that's right up P-F1's alley. Thanks for setting it straight.
 
2017-10-17 02:12:58 PM  
[hes-right-you-know.jpg]

At least Carlos Sainz gets to go to Renault so he won't get stuck trying to nurse home that shiat Honda engine every race weekend.
 
2017-10-17 02:15:02 PM  
Well, he's not wrong, is he?  And he's likely had to change shoes six times during the season due to all the walking he's done back to pit lane, precisely because your piece of shiat engine died so frequently.  Add to that the ridiculous grid penalties which wiped out any momentary good feelings from a solid qualifying lap, and resulted in him having to start almost every race at the ass end of the field... and someone at Honda had the gall to suggest that THEY weren't happy with his attitude?!  You're talking about a two-time world champion who is one of the most accomplished drivers on the entire planet, and you give him the equivalent of mechanical dog shiat every single race, how exactly did you expect him to respond?!
 
2017-10-17 03:36:34 PM  

one0nine: Well, he's not wrong, is he?  And he's likely had to change shoes six times during the season due to all the walking he's done back to pit lane, precisely because your piece of shiat engine died so frequently.  Add to that the ridiculous grid penalties which wiped out any momentary good feelings from a solid qualifying lap, and resulted in him having to start almost every race at the ass end of the field... and someone at Honda had the gall to suggest that THEY weren't happy with his attitude?!  You're talking about a two-time world champion who is one of the most accomplished drivers on the entire planet, and you give him the equivalent of mechanical dog shiat every single race, how exactly did you expect him to respond?!


This. F1 drivers have a limited time at the top of the sport, and Alonso has had to waste several years with barely a point here and there.

/Thought Lewis was taking a risk moving to Mercedes and leaving McLaren. Boy did he time that move right.
//Also bizarre considering Honda have a long record of huge success in F1.  Senna and Prost won plenty of races with a Honda engine. Yet they just can't seem to get it right.
 
2017-10-17 06:18:22 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: one0nine: Well, he's not wrong, is he?  And he's likely had to change shoes six times during the season due to all the walking he's done back to pit lane, precisely because your piece of shiat engine died so frequently.  Add to that the ridiculous grid penalties which wiped out any momentary good feelings from a solid qualifying lap, and resulted in him having to start almost every race at the ass end of the field... and someone at Honda had the gall to suggest that THEY weren't happy with his attitude?!  You're talking about a two-time world champion who is one of the most accomplished drivers on the entire planet, and you give him the equivalent of mechanical dog shiat every single race, how exactly did you expect him to respond?!

This. F1 drivers have a limited time at the top of the sport, and Alonso has had to waste several years with barely a point here and there.

/Thought Lewis was taking a risk moving to Mercedes and leaving McLaren. Boy did he time that move right.
//Also bizarre considering Honda have a long record of huge success in F1.  Senna and Prost won plenty of races with a Honda engine. Yet they just can't seem to get it right.


Honda F1 of the 80's was the place where they sent young engineers who didn't have a place in the Zaibatsu ladder to peddle their papers, try shiat out without fear of bureaucratic oversight or micromanagement, and basically have the sort of academic and experimental freedom that most fresh-out-of-university hotshots could only dream of.  That group became Mugen, and then was dissolved in the economic crash of the 90's.

Honda F1 of the 90's and beyond has been a bureaucratized flagship, run by the mother corporation and under tight control from headquarters.  In the meantime, Honda of America (Acura) has set up Honda Research Team (HRT), where young hotshot engineers go to play around with ideas and concepts with minimal oversight.  And their P2, GT3, and now DPi programs have had or look to be poised for great success.
 
2017-10-17 06:42:36 PM  

Kurohone: Honda F1 of the 80's was the place where they sent young engineers who didn't have a place in the Zaibatsu ladder to peddle their papers, try shiat out without fear of bureaucratic oversight or micromanagement, and basically have the sort of academic and experimental freedom that most fresh-out-of-university hotshots could only dream of.  That group became Mugen, and then was dissolved in the economic crash of the 90's.

Honda F1 of the 90's and beyond has been a bureaucratized flagship, run by the mother corporation and under tight control from headquarters.  In the meantime, Honda of America (Acura) has set up Honda Research Team (HRT), where young hotshot engineers go to play around with ideas and concepts with minimal oversight.  And their P2, GT3, and now DPi programs have had or look to be poised for great success.


I heard a story a while ago that Honda put some exec with no motor racing experience in charge of their return to F1 and the engine development and, though the results have been terrible, it would loose too much face for the company or the CEO to replace him and get someone else in. It would show the CEO made a mistake giving him the job in the first place.
No idea how true that is but it's consistent with your comments.

/I imagine Honda are still pissed about bailing out of F1 and selling the team for peanuts to the team manager, a chap by the name of Ross Brawn, who threw another engine in the car and won the championship.
The only team to have a perfect record.
Years competed in F1: One.
Drivers championships won: One.
Constructors championships won: One.
 
2017-10-17 07:25:41 PM  
Honda's MotoGP program have no problem competing at the top. And despite being potentially as bureaucratically controlled as the F1 program, have no problem winning multiple championships. Having a weirdo space alien as a rider in Marc Marquez probably doesn't hurt, but you can say the same thing about Alonso. They both have no problem wringing the utmost out of a potentially non-ideal vehicle and being on the limit every lap and still thinking ahead 5-10 laps for strategy.

 If I have one big problem with Hamilton, if the car is off a bit, he's not able to adapt and bring in a better result than he should. Don't get me wrong, when the car is on, he's freaking amazing. Alonso and Marquez can elevate their car/bike, and when it's on, they're freaking otherworldly.
 
2017-10-17 08:24:46 PM  

soopey: If I have one big problem with Hamilton, if the car is off a bit, he's not able to adapt and bring in a better result than he should. Don't get me wrong, when the car is on, he's freaking amazing.


I give Lewis huge credit because unlike Vettel and Schumacher he's always had equal teammates. Seb and Schumy have generally always had number two drivers often ordered to allow them to win.

/Though my opinion of Rosberg has gone up. He was in a great car, sure. But I rate Bottas and yet he generally hasn't come close to Lewis this year in the same car. Nico beat Lewis fairly often.
 
2017-10-17 09:22:56 PM  

Kurohone: Honda F1 of the 80's was the place where they sent young engineers who didn't have a place in the Zaibatsu ladder to peddle their papers, try shiat out without fear of bureaucratic oversight or micromanagement, and basically have the sort of academic and experimental freedom that most fresh-out-of-university hotshots could only dream of.  That group became Mugen, and then was dissolved in the economic crash of the 90's.

Honda F1 of the 90's and beyond has been a bureaucratized flagship, run by the mother corporation and under tight control from headquarters.  In the meantime, Honda of America (Acura) has set up Honda Research Team (HRT), where young hotshot engineers go to play around with ideas and concepts with minimal oversight.  And their P2, GT3, and now DPi programs have had or look to be poised for great success.


Honda got its reputation with the Williams and McLaren teams of the 80s and 90s, but in a way, that Honda is the anomaly. Honda's first go at F1 back in the 60s was plagued by overweight cars that squandered the powerful engines that ran them, and ended up with two wins over five years and one cremated driver because they wouldn't listen to an eight-time world champion when he said the car wasn't ready for competition.

Honda of the 2000s was just kind of mediocre, both as the engine supplier to BAR and as their own team. They'd collect points and the odd win, but outside of 2004 where BAR got second, they were mostly midfield. The nice powerful engines of before were kinda gone. The last two years before they sold to Brawn were just awful with the works team finishing just above Super Aguri. And we all know what's been going on the last few years.

And it's a little hard to judge Mugen, given that outside of Jordan, their engines never really got put into particularly good cars (Footwork? Ligier? The smoldering husk of Lotus?).

/ Mostly based on my own recollections
// Bolstered by a quick peek at the results on Wiki
 
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