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(SFGate)   "AirAsia apologizes to passengers for any inconvenience caused." "Including when our flight attendants started screaming 'YOU'RE ALL ABOUT TO DIE'" they should have added   ( sfgate.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Airline, AirAsia, Airport, cabin air pressure, Indonesia AirAsia flight, Cabin pressurization, panicked flight crew, Flight attendant  
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1435 clicks; posted to Business » on 16 Oct 2017 at 5:50 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-10-16 05:23:45 PM  
"Also for any incontinence caused"
 
2017-10-16 06:23:25 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-10-16 06:28:33 PM  
Reassurance - AirAsia Style:

s.yimg.comView Full Size
 
2017-10-16 06:32:11 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-10-16 06:40:06 PM  
oftwominds.comView Full Size
 
2017-10-16 07:26:56 PM  
If you tried to train young sky waitresses the way they used to, they would quit or sue you.

We're all going to die.
 
2017-10-16 08:12:45 PM  
Any pilots out there want to chip in what sort of angle of attack 20k ft lost over 9 minutes looks like? Because in my brain, that doesn't seem that outrageous, like I could be completely wrong but would an elevation change like that even register as unusual without a crew going into panic mode?
 
2017-10-16 08:40:17 PM  

Cheeseface: Any pilots out there want to chip in what sort of angle of attack 20k ft lost over 9 minutes looks like? Because in my brain, that doesn't seem that outrageous, like I could be completely wrong but would an elevation change like that even register as unusual without a crew going into panic mode?


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-10-16 08:43:23 PM  

Cheeseface: Any pilots out there want to chip in what sort of angle of attack 20k ft lost over 9 minutes looks like? Because in my brain, that doesn't seem that outrageous, like I could be completely wrong but would an elevation change like that even register as unusual without a crew going into panic mode?


That's 2200 feet per minute. Google suggests normal descent rate is 2000-2500 feet per minute, so...
 
2017-10-16 10:13:46 PM  
I'm a relatively nervous flyer, mostly because I have control issues (as in, if I had the controls, or felt secure with what was going on in the cockpit), so if the flight crew freaks, I'm definitely going to have a problem.

/end not CSB
 
2017-10-16 10:27:28 PM  

itcamefromschenectady: Cheeseface: Any pilots out there want to chip in what sort of angle of attack 20k ft lost over 9 minutes looks like? Because in my brain, that doesn't seem that outrageous, like I could be completely wrong but would an elevation change like that even register as unusual without a crew going into panic mode?

That's 2200 feet per minute. Google suggests normal descent rate is 2000-2500 feet per minute, so...


It's a tad steeper perhaps than your average descent rate, but in all likelihood it would not be alarming, and is certainly well within acceptable/normal descent rates for a commercial aircraft. Hell, they could have deployed speedbrakes and been descending at ~3500 ft/min and it still wouldn't have been dangerous (though the vibrations from the extra drag would have been noticeable to the passengers). When I initially read about this I wondered what streetcorner they picked that cabin crew off of. A descent of this nature would be standard procedure for a pressurization issue, something the flight attendants should have been briefed on, and is no excuse for panicking and unnerving the passengers like that.

/Not a pilot, just an aviation enthusiast
 
2017-10-16 11:09:33 PM  

JustLookin: I'm a relatively nervous flyer, mostly because I have control issues (as in, if I had the controls, or felt secure with what was going on in the cockpit), so if the flight crew freaks, I'm definitely going to have a problem.

/end not CSB


Airplane - Nervous
Youtube MjQMJ8fvQe4
 
2017-10-17 02:00:43 AM  

LurkerSupreme: itcamefromschenectady: Cheeseface: Any pilots out there want to chip in what sort of angle of attack 20k ft lost over 9 minutes looks like? Because in my brain, that doesn't seem that outrageous, like I could be completely wrong but would an elevation change like that even register as unusual without a crew going into panic mode?

That's 2200 feet per minute. Google suggests normal descent rate is 2000-2500 feet per minute, so...

It's a tad steeper perhaps than your average descent rate, but in all likelihood it would not be alarming, and is certainly well within acceptable/normal descent rates for a commercial aircraft. Hell, they could have deployed speedbrakes and been descending at ~3500 ft/min and it still wouldn't have been dangerous (though the vibrations from the extra drag would have been noticeable to the passengers). When I initially read about this I wondered what streetcorner they picked that cabin crew off of. A descent of this nature would be standard procedure for a pressurization issue, something the flight attendants should have been briefed on, and is no excuse for panicking and unnerving the passengers like that.

/Not a pilot, just an aviation enthusiast


I dunno. Immediately after takeoff I'd have assumed okay we're going back to land, I hope the landing gear isn't stuck. That far into the flight but well before the destination and I'm questionably alarmed.
 
2017-10-17 03:04:39 AM  

almandot: I dunno. Immediately after takeoff I'd have assumed okay we're going back to land, I hope the landing gear isn't stuck. That far into the flight but well before the destination and I'm questionably alarmed.


As a passenger that's understandable. For a flight attendant that is another story. In spite of the perception that they're little more than sky waitresses, they usually receive at least some training/briefing on the various scenarios that could occur during flight and what the pilots will do and their duties, and pressurization issues -> descent would be near the top of the list. And even if they were freaked out by the situation, since they are the liaison between the pilots and the rest of the plane the passengers often look to them to determine the severity of the situation, and as such they don't have the luxury of losing their composure.

For them to freak out and assume the worst the moment the oxygen masks drop shows either severely deficient training or that they are far too easily alarmed to be a flight attendant. They should be able to handle emergencies both big and small without becoming hysterical. Otherwise they would be useless in assisting getting the passengers to safety had the situation been more dire.
 
2017-10-17 03:11:24 AM  

almandot: LurkerSupreme: itcamefromschenectady: Cheeseface: Any pilots out there want to chip in what sort of angle of attack 20k ft lost over 9 minutes looks like? Because in my brain, that doesn't seem that outrageous, like I could be completely wrong but would an elevation change like that even register as unusual without a crew going into panic mode?

That's 2200 feet per minute. Google suggests normal descent rate is 2000-2500 feet per minute, so...

It's a tad steeper perhaps than your average descent rate, but in all likelihood it would not be alarming, and is certainly well within acceptable/normal descent rates for a commercial aircraft. Hell, they could have deployed speedbrakes and been descending at ~3500 ft/min and it still wouldn't have been dangerous (though the vibrations from the extra drag would have been noticeable to the passengers). When I initially read about this I wondered what streetcorner they picked that cabin crew off of. A descent of this nature would be standard procedure for a pressurization issue, something the flight attendants should have been briefed on, and is no excuse for panicking and unnerving the passengers like that.

/Not a pilot, just an aviation enthusiast

I dunno. Immediately after takeoff I'd have assumed okay we're going back to land, I hope the landing gear isn't stuck. That far into the flight but well before the destination and I'm questionably alarmed.


The controlled descent to 10000 ft is reassuring; it's the depressurisation of the plane that would be a bit alarming.

/sounds like this entire crew needed a good snap-out-of-it slap from a long queue of passengers
 
2017-10-17 06:13:08 AM  
Budget airline with budget cabin personell
 
2017-10-17 06:24:38 AM  

lucksi: Budget airline with budget cabin personell


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=LQ468ib​pQ4M
 
2017-10-17 07:53:16 AM  
"AirIsrael, please clear the runway!"

cdn-images-1.medium.comView Full Size
 
2017-10-17 08:54:51 AM  

WordsnCollision: [img.fark.net image 480x348]


Strong contender for all time top 5 TV comedy moment
 
2017-10-17 09:55:07 AM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: almandot: LurkerSupreme: itcamefromschenectady: Cheeseface: Any pilots out there want to chip in what sort of angle of attack 20k ft lost over 9 minutes looks like? Because in my brain, that doesn't seem that outrageous, like I could be completely wrong but would an elevation change like that even register as unusual without a crew going into panic mode?

That's 2200 feet per minute. Google suggests normal descent rate is 2000-2500 feet per minute, so...

It's a tad steeper perhaps than your average descent rate, but in all likelihood it would not be alarming, and is certainly well within acceptable/normal descent rates for a commercial aircraft. Hell, they could have deployed speedbrakes and been descending at ~3500 ft/min and it still wouldn't have been dangerous (though the vibrations from the extra drag would have been noticeable to the passengers). When I initially read about this I wondered what streetcorner they picked that cabin crew off of. A descent of this nature would be standard procedure for a pressurization issue, something the flight attendants should have been briefed on, and is no excuse for panicking and unnerving the passengers like that.

/Not a pilot, just an aviation enthusiast

I dunno. Immediately after takeoff I'd have assumed okay we're going back to land, I hope the landing gear isn't stuck. That far into the flight but well before the destination and I'm questionably alarmed.

The controlled descent to 10000 ft is reassuring; it's the depressurisation of the plane that would be a bit alarming.

/sounds like this entire crew needed a good snap-out-of-it slap from a long queue of passengers


I read it as a two stage descent, first a very rapid 10,000 feet to get them to the altitude that people wouldn't asphixiate due to hypoxia and then a much more leisurely descent after that.  The whole "EMERGENCY" 5 minutes of silence and then a return to normalcy is probably around the time when you had to be on oxogen or you would pass out.

So in my mind the events were:

-Lose cabin pressure, and collective shiat.
-Announcement things are going sideways, "EMERGENCY"
-Oxogen mask deployment and rapid 10,000 foot reduction in altitude.
-Quiet time as they go at a more leisurely pace of altitude reduction.
-Masks come off and announcements continue.

It feels more like a communication issue where they left the passengers a bit in the dark while the crew wore oxogen masks and then once the masks were off didn't get back on the PA to explain that things were still kind of bad but its going to be ok.
 
2017-10-17 03:07:59 PM  

JustLookin: I'm a relatively nervous flyer, mostly because I have control issues (as in, if I had the controls, or felt secure with what was going on in the cockpit), so if the flight crew freaks, I'm definitely going to have a problem.

/end not CSB


I was on a flight out of Phoenix to New Jersey that got bumpy, and you really do look to the flight crew to see what their reaction is. On a previous flight it felt as if we were being thrown about the sky like a BB in a boxcar, and the flight crew was getting the coffee and biscuits cart, so I figured it was just my own inexperience.

This time, I looked to the flight crew, and was a little unnerved to find them sitting strapped to their jump seats, arms around their torsos, looking slightly nauseous and making eye contact with nobody, not even each other. They looked as if they'd been condemned.

I thought, "Well, we're all gonna die."
 
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