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(Guardian)   The latest addition to the 'disasters' menu of SimPlanet 2017 is an 8.5 tonne Chinese space station in a decaying orbit   ( theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Space exploration, space station, International Space Station, 8.5-tonne Chinese space, potent political symbol, ambitious scientific push, completely uncontrolled descent, space industry enthusiast  
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7113 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Oct 2017 at 7:54 AM (10 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-10-13 02:18:55 AM  
That can't be right. How could a Chinese station be more than one tonne?
 
2017-10-13 02:34:30 AM  
pbs.twimg.com

So there's a space station. Big deal. It'll burn up in our atmosphere and whatever's left will be no bigger than a chihuahua's head.

Of course I'm right. If I'm not, may we all be horribly crushed from above somehow.
 
2017-10-13 03:24:01 AM  
Western Australia says "Not this shiat again."
 
2017-10-13 07:21:11 AM  
Maybe it will hit the yellowstone volcano.
 
2017-10-13 07:29:32 AM  
Get Elon to catch it with one of his barges.
 
2017-10-13 07:43:57 AM  
So is Panda Express going to put a target out in the Pacific for it - or is that strictly a Taco Bell thing?
 
2017-10-13 07:55:33 AM  
Space shuttle external tank weighed 35 tonnes empty.  Far as I know nothing made it back to hit the water (or am I wrong on this?), burned up completely.  So I'm not too concerned.
 
2017-10-13 07:57:57 AM  
i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2017-10-13 08:02:50 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-10-13 08:03:59 AM  
I like British spelling.  Ye olde space stationne weighs 85 tonne which is probably a lot of stone.  Whatever a stone is.
 
2017-10-13 08:04:06 AM  
Subby sounds young

img.fark.net
 
2017-10-13 08:04:52 AM  

Farking Clown Shoes: That can't be right. How could a Chinese station be more than one tonne?


How many is won ton?
 
2017-10-13 08:07:01 AM  
Off topic, but man, I'd love a sequel to Sim Earth.
 
2017-10-13 08:07:22 AM  

Rapmaster2000: Whatever a stone is.


Somewhere around 14 lb., I believe ..
 
2017-10-13 08:07:48 AM  
thedesk.matthewkeys.net
 
2017-10-13 08:10:13 AM  
Great. Another derper.
Should have used fluoride.
 
2017-10-13 08:12:18 AM  
www.reelfilm.com
 
2017-10-13 08:12:31 AM  
Are the Chinese going to be fined for littering like the US was when Skylab came down?

Fun Fact: The song "Don't Bring Me Down" by ELO was dedicated to Skylab.
 
2017-10-13 08:12:43 AM  
media.tenor.com
 
2017-10-13 08:13:56 AM  
I saw it go across the sky earlier this week.
 
2017-10-13 08:17:54 AM  
Sweet!

I can't find this on Steam though.
 
2017-10-13 08:18:40 AM  
Anyone remember Devo's song, "Space Junk" from their "We Are Not Men" album?  That's the first thing I thought of...

Devo Space Junk
Youtube nFCU_Ld9snU
 
2017-10-13 08:28:40 AM  
Almost forgot this comic.
i.pinimg.com
 
2017-10-13 08:32:34 AM  

nekom: Space shuttle external tank weighed 35 tonnes empty.  Far as I know nothing made it back to hit the water (or am I wrong on this?), burned up completely.  So I'm not too concerned.


Pretty sure they did make it back to the water in pieces, but they were almost always managed falls; the one case that wasn't, well, it tore itself to pieces on the way up.

There'd be pretty significant structural design differences as well; the biggest obvious one being that there wouldn't be an airlock door on a fuel tank.  That was the biggest single concern with Skylab, if I recall correctly.
 
2017-10-13 08:32:59 AM  
We will know that karma exists if the station crashes into a gathering of flat earthers.
 
2017-10-13 08:38:31 AM  
The problem with getting hit by a Chinese space station, is that an hour later you want to get hit again.
 
2017-10-13 08:39:34 AM  
assets.mubi.com


Here we go!!!
".....dreams seen by a man-made machine."
 
2017-10-13 08:41:05 AM  

TheMysteriousStranger: We will know that karma exists if the station crashes into a gathering of flat earthers.


They would be flattened.
 
2017-10-13 08:41:54 AM  

Kurohone: nekom: Space shuttle external tank weighed 35 tonnes empty.  Far as I know nothing made it back to hit the water (or am I wrong on this?), burned up completely.  So I'm not too concerned.

Pretty sure they did make it back to the water in pieces, but they were almost always managed falls; the one case that wasn't, well, it tore itself to pieces on the way up.

There'd be pretty significant structural design differences as well; the biggest obvious one being that there wouldn't be an airlock door on a fuel tank.  That was the biggest single concern with Skylab, if I recall correctly.


The fuel tanks broke up before hitting the Indian or Pacific ocean. They hold the SRBs and the shuttle together so there's plenty of structural components that will survive reentry. They just aim them somewhere away from shipping lanes and forget about them.
 
2017-10-13 08:42:56 AM  
img.fark.net

/2016 came for the celebrities.
/2017 is coming for the rest of us.
 
2017-10-13 08:43:38 AM  

nekom: Space shuttle external tank weighed 35 tonnes empty.  Far as I know nothing made it back to hit the water (or am I wrong on this?), burned up completely.  So I'm not too concerned.


After 1998, 26.5 tonnes.
 
2017-10-13 08:44:02 AM  
Predicting where it is going to come down would be impossible even in the days ahead of its landing, McDowell said.

Landing?

img.fark.net
 
2017-10-13 08:44:11 AM  

TheMysteriousStranger: We will know that karma exists if the station crashes into a gathering of flat earthers.


Or a scattering of flattened earthers grounded in reality..
 
2017-10-13 08:55:52 AM  

big pig peaches: Predicting where it is going to come down would be impossible even in the days ahead of its landing, McDowell said.

Landing?

[img.fark.net image 400x400]


Everything is a "landing". There are no crashes these days.
The space station is not crashing; it will go into a non-aided, unassisted, uncontrolled landing into the terrain resulting in a kineteic energy release event and stratum deformation.
 
2017-10-13 09:02:27 AM  

eyeq360: big pig peaches: Predicting where it is going to come down would be impossible even in the days ahead of its landing, McDowell said.

Landing?

[img.fark.net image 400x400]

Everything is a "landing". There are no crashes these days.
The space station is not crashing; it will go into a non-aided, unassisted, uncontrolled landing into the terrain resulting in a kineteic energy release event and stratum deformation.


I believe that's called lithobraking
 
2017-10-13 09:02:57 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-10-13 09:07:06 AM  

nekom: Space shuttle external tank weighed 35 tonnes empty.  Far as I know nothing made it back to hit the water (or am I wrong on this?), burned up completely.  So I'm not too concerned.


The external take did not completely burn up though it would break up.  NASA intentionally arranged it for the falling debris of the external tank to land in a part of the Indian Ocean usually unused by ocean shipping.   All space launches have to be planned with where debris from expendable stages will come down.

The Chinese station's point of reentry is not going to be controlled.  The odds are it won't kill anyone, but risk are far greater than if they had been able to decide where the station would be deorbited.
 
2017-10-13 09:14:10 AM  
img.fark.net

Subby just brought back some fond memories.

/little did i know the things i would come to learn
 
2017-10-13 09:14:49 AM  

eyeq360: big pig peaches: Predicting where it is going to come down would be impossible even in the days ahead of its landing, McDowell said.

Landing?

[img.fark.net image 400x400]

Everything is a "landing". There are no crashes these days.
The space station is not crashing; it will go into a non-aided, unassisted, uncontrolled landing into the terrain resulting in a kineteic energy release event and stratum deformation.


I suppose your right. We wouldn't want to hurt the feeling of the Chinese space agency.

Maybe we should give them some stickers.
 
2017-10-13 09:17:13 AM  

davidphogan: [pbs.twimg.com image 576x432]

So there's a space station. Big deal. It'll burn up in our atmosphere and whatever's left will be no bigger than a chihuahua's head.

Of course I'm right. If I'm not, may we all be horribly crushed from above somehow.


You're too young to have watched "Northern Exposure".
 
2017-10-13 09:17:40 AM  
So no free tacos from Taco Bell?

Fuel tanks and solar array parts are the most likely things to make it down, for differing reasons.
 
2017-10-13 09:18:05 AM  

nekom: Space shuttle external tank weighed 35 tonnes empty.  Far as I know nothing made it back to hit the water (or am I wrong on this?), burned up completely.  So I'm not too concerned.

I was gonna say, isn't 8.5 tonnes on the lean side for a space station?  Someone miss a decimal point?
 
2017-10-13 09:20:45 AM  

big pig peaches: eyeq360: big pig peaches: Predicting where it is going to come down would be impossible even in the days ahead of its landing, McDowell said.

Landing?

[img.fark.net image 400x400]

Everything is a "landing". There are no crashes these days.
The space station is not crashing; it will go into a non-aided, unassisted, uncontrolled landing into the terrain resulting in a kineteic energy release event and stratum deformation.

I suppose your right. We wouldn't want to hurt the feeling of the Chinese space agency.

Maybe we should give them some stickers.


The National Transportation Safety Board called plane and helicopter crashes "uncontrolled landings into terrain" back in the 1970s. The military used similar language for their crashes as well.
 
2017-10-13 09:25:39 AM  

eyeq360: big pig peaches: eyeq360: big pig peaches: Predicting where it is going to come down would be impossible even in the days ahead of its landing, McDowell said.

Landing?

[img.fark.net image 400x400]

Everything is a "landing". There are no crashes these days.
The space station is not crashing; it will go into a non-aided, unassisted, uncontrolled landing into the terrain resulting in a kineteic energy release event and stratum deformation.

I suppose your right. We wouldn't want to hurt the feeling of the Chinese space agency.

Maybe we should give them some stickers.

The National Transportation Safety Board called plane and helicopter crashes "uncontrolled landings into terrain" back in the 1970s. The military used similar language for their crashes as well.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Controlled_flight_into_terrain

The ultimate form of pilot error.
 
2017-10-13 09:37:09 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-10-13 09:37:42 AM  
We got this.....

www.universetoday.com
 
2017-10-13 09:41:05 AM  

Kurohone: nekom: Space shuttle external tank weighed 35 tonnes empty.  Far as I know nothing made it back to hit the water (or am I wrong on this?), burned up completely.  So I'm not too concerned.

Pretty sure they did make it back to the water in pieces, but they were almost always managed falls; the one case that wasn't, well, it tore itself to pieces on the way up.

There'd be pretty significant structural design differences as well; the biggest obvious one being that there wouldn't be an airlock door on a fuel tank.  That was the biggest single concern with Skylab, if I recall correctly.


The key component is how uncontrolled a reentry and are they going to disclose how many fuel tanks on the sattelite will survive reentry.  Cause those bastards usually will make it through.
 
2017-10-13 09:45:43 AM  

rummonkey: [img.fark.net image 850x478]


That Kerbal looks way too happy to be burning to death on re-entry

/goofiest game I've ever played :D
 
2017-10-13 09:46:06 AM  

eyeq360: big pig peaches: Predicting where it is going to come down would be impossible even in the days ahead of its landing, McDowell said.

Landing?

[img.fark.net image 400x400]

Everything is a "landing". There are no crashes these days.
The space station is not crashing; it will go into a non-aided, unassisted, uncontrolled landing into the terrain resulting in a kineteic energy release event and stratum deformation.


End of sequence lithobraking maneuver
 
2017-10-13 09:46:22 AM  

Invincible: eyeq360: big pig peaches: Predicting where it is going to come down would be impossible even in the days ahead of its landing, McDowell said.

Landing?

[img.fark.net image 400x400]

Everything is a "landing". There are no crashes these days.
The space station is not crashing; it will go into a non-aided, unassisted, uncontrolled landing into the terrain resulting in a kineteic energy release event and stratum deformation.

I believe that's called lithobraking


Dammit
 
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