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(CNBC)   Richard Branson invests in Hyperloop, which is being renamed the Virgin Hyperloop. Coincidentally, "virgin hyperloop" is also how I referred to my sophomore year of high school   ( cnbc.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Virgin Group, hyperloop, Virgin Hyperloop, Virgin Group empire, Virgin Atlantic Airways, Chairman Shervin Pishevar, billionaire British investor, Branson  
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1412 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Oct 2017 at 8:10 PM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



30 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-10-12 12:14:24 PM  
I think the more interesting story here is how that apparently works as a metaphor for Subby's sophomore year of high school. Like... I'm medically curious...
 
2017-10-12 12:33:02 PM  
Some critics have poured cold water on the hyperloop. Amtrak President Richard Anderson told CNBC recently that hyperloop systems would not be taking over rail transport anytime soon. He also added that such technology is not "realistic" right now

Also the electric car will never be a hit.  And re-using the first stage boosters of a rocket?  Clearly preposterous.  You'd have to be insane to even imagine such a thing.
 
2017-10-12 04:03:47 PM  
Also what I named my Madonna Dance Music cover band.
 
2017-10-12 08:13:38 PM  

That Guy What Stole the Bacon: I think the more interesting story here is how that apparently works as a metaphor for Subby's sophomore year of high school. Like... I'm medically curious...


Submitter sucked so much that they created a vacuum
 
2017-10-12 08:17:35 PM  
Say what you want about people like Branson and Musk, I can't help but feel a lot of admiration for the kind of people who look to the Future and say, sure maybe we can make that awesome cool thing work. And then throw money and work at the problem until something amazing happens.

The world is full of too many people talking about all the things we can't do. It's nice to see the people who are excited about all the things that we can do.

In my own little way I try to be like that. But I don't have any money, so I can't quite do it at the same scale.
 
2017-10-12 08:19:40 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Some critics have poured cold water on the hyperloop. Amtrak President Richard Anderson told CNBC recently that hyperloop systems would not be taking over rail transport anytime soon. He also added that such technology is not "realistic" right now

Also the electric car will never be a hit.  And re-using the first stage boosters of a rocket?  Clearly preposterous.  You'd have to be insane to even imagine such a thing.


It's more of a ShelbyVille kind of thing...
 
2017-10-12 08:22:22 PM  

chawco: Say what you want about people like Branson and Musk, I can't help but feel a lot of admiration for the kind of people who look to the Future and say, sure maybe we can make that awesome cool thing work. And then throw money and work at the problem until something amazing happens.

The world is full of too many people talking about all the things we can't do. It's nice to see the people who are excited about all the things that we can do.

In my own little way I try to be like that. But I don't have any money, so I can't quite do it at the same scale.


agreed. I think alot of these guys are full of pure fark jelly.
 
2017-10-12 08:24:23 PM  
On one hand I don't know if I could ever bring myself to go in a hyperloop.

On the other hand, this has been a science fiction feature for a long time. It'll be incredible if they can make this happen.
 
2017-10-12 08:25:14 PM  

chawco: Say what you want about people like Branson and Musk, I can't help but feel a lot of admiration for the kind of people who look to the Future and say, sure maybe we can make that awesome cool thing work. And then throw money and work at the problem until something amazing happens.

The world is full of too many people talking about all the things we can't do. It's nice to see the people who are excited about all the things that we can do.

In my own little way I try to be like that. But I don't have any money, so I can't quite do it at the same scale.


Oh boy. So much THIS^^^
 
2017-10-12 08:29:24 PM  
It's not sci-fi, it's steampunk

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-10-12 08:33:12 PM  
 
2017-10-12 08:36:15 PM  
NSFW, sorry
 
2017-10-12 08:40:33 PM  

Short Victoria's War: Marcus Aurelius: Some critics have poured cold water on the hyperloop. Amtrak President Richard Anderson told CNBC recently that hyperloop systems would not be taking over rail transport anytime soon. He also added that such technology is not "realistic" right now

Also the electric car will never be a hit.  And re-using the first stage boosters of a rocket?  Clearly preposterous.  You'd have to be insane to even imagine such a thing.

It's more of a ShelbyVille kind of thing...


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-10-12 09:04:09 PM  
There's nothing practical about this project at all.
This is a money hole, like solar roadways.
 Sorry guys, but for some things the math just doesn't work out.
 
2017-10-12 09:06:05 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Some critics have poured cold water on the hyperloop. Amtrak President Richard Anderson told CNBC recently that hyperloop systems would not be taking over rail transport anytime soon. He also added that such technology is not "realistic" right now

Also the electric car will never be a hit.  And re-using the first stage boosters of a rocket?  Clearly preposterous.  You'd have to be insane to even imagine such a thing.


Agreed, but the current hyper loop system design has some seriousphysics issues to overcome long before it will ever reach anything close to 700mph for extended distances.
 
2017-10-12 09:24:41 PM  

ChuckRoddy: There's nothing practical about this project at all.
This is a money hole, like solar roadways.
 Sorry guys, but for some things the math just doesn't work out.


Somehow, I think the highly intelligent people working on this project who are investing hundreds of millions of dollars took the time to check the math.

They may be highly optimistic, and it may be an uphill battle, but I'm pretty sure you can be certain that they check the theory behind this before they pumped piles of money and time into it. At the very least, it is theoretically possible.
 
2017-10-12 09:53:55 PM  
Without doing a bunch of research, can someone tell me what the biggest issues still are? A while back the ones I kept hearing about(that I remember) were:

The vacuum seals for each section of tube have to deal with massive, daily expansion and contraction

The consequences of what would happen if vacuum were lost too close to passengers traveling at high speed

The cost of boring underground and burying the tube to avoid accidental and purposeful puncturing of the tube
 
2017-10-12 10:03:25 PM  

chawco: ChuckRoddy: There's nothing practical about this project at all.
This is a money hole, like solar roadways.
 Sorry guys, but for some things the math just doesn't work out.

Somehow, I think the highly intelligent people working on this project who are investing hundreds of millions of dollars took the time to check the math.

They may be highly optimistic, and it may be an uphill battle, but I'm pretty sure you can be certain that they check the theory behind this before they pumped piles of money and time into it. At the very least, it is theoretically possible.


Well, you would think so. Interestingly enough, the real problem with the design is the basic premise of the it. Removing atmosphere in the tube to reduce drag on the "train" so it can execrate and maintain speed at a greatly reduced power requirement. Running even a light vacuum in a tube that is hundreds of miles long creates all kinds of system problems. On paper, the math works fine, the problem is real world application of the design. The tube will require hundreds of valves in the system that have to completely close off the tube to maintain the vacuum. High speed train with hundreds of doors in the way that all have to open and close without failure or you have a bunch of people goo inside the train when it hits. The system will need thousands of expansion joints to compensate for expansion and contraction of the tube, any one of which could be a potential catastrophic failure point. From and engineering standpoint, this thing will be the equivalent of taking people into space.
 
2017-10-12 10:06:14 PM  
Accelerate, not execrate.
 
2017-10-12 10:31:46 PM  

Someone Else's Alt: chawco: ChuckRoddy: There's nothing practical about this project at all.
This is a money hole, like solar roadways.
 Sorry guys, but for some things the math just doesn't work out.

Somehow, I think the highly intelligent people working on this project who are investing hundreds of millions of dollars took the time to check the math.

They may be highly optimistic, and it may be an uphill battle, but I'm pretty sure you can be certain that they check the theory behind this before they pumped piles of money and time into it. At the very least, it is theoretically possible.

Well, you would think so. Interestingly enough, the real problem with the design is the basic premise of the it. Removing atmosphere in the tube to reduce drag on the "train" so it can execrate and maintain speed at a greatly reduced power requirement. Running even a light vacuum in a tube that is hundreds of miles long creates all kinds of system problems. On paper, the math works fine, the problem is real world application of the design. The tube will require hundreds of valves in the system that have to completely close off the tube to maintain the vacuum. High speed train with hundreds of doors in the way that all have to open and close without failure or you have a bunch of people goo inside the train when it hits. The system will need thousands of expansion joints to compensate for expansion and contraction of the tube, any one of which could be a potential catastrophic failure point. From and engineering standpoint, this thing will be the equivalent of taking people into space.


Damn, I wish someone had told us this thing was going to require valves, seals and joints or we never would have bothered. Those things are, like, impossible.
 
2017-10-12 10:41:45 PM  

chawco: ChuckRoddy: There's nothing practical about this project at all.
This is a money hole, like solar roadways.
 Sorry guys, but for some things the math just doesn't work out.

Somehow, I think the highly intelligent people working on this project who are investing hundreds of millions of dollars took the time to check the math.

They may be highly optimistic, and it may be an uphill battle, but I'm pretty sure you can be certain that they check the theory behind this before they pumped piles of money and time into it. At the very least, it is theoretically possible.


There will always be highly educated people doing stupid things. People are fallible. There's plenty of room for ego and self delusion.  Remember the challenger? Really smart people worked on that one. Or the Mars lander that crashed? And these were from highly tested designs.

Go outside and look at a bridge. What do you see every 10-20 yards? Huge expansion joints. That's because metal changes size based on the temperature. What's a singular tube going to do over several hundred miles? The sun will warm the top and the bottom will cool. It's going to buckle.

And how big of a deal is 1 atmosphere of pressure?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WJVHtF8GwI

Really, really question the wisdom of anyone investing millions in a system where a single flaw will cause a cascading destruction event.
 
2017-10-12 10:59:54 PM  
The entrepreneurial genius of Richard Branson has finally evolved into just investing in Elon Musk projects.
 
2017-10-12 11:04:08 PM  

Hollie Maea: Someone Else's Alt: chawco: ChuckRoddy: There's nothing practical about this project at all.
This is a money hole, like solar roadways.
 Sorry guys, but for some things the math just doesn't work out.

Somehow, I think the highly intelligent people working on this project who are investing hundreds of millions of dollars took the time to check the math.

They may be highly optimistic, and it may be an uphill battle, but I'm pretty sure you can be certain that they check the theory behind this before they pumped piles of money and time into it. At the very least, it is theoretically possible.

Well, you would think so. Interestingly enough, the real problem with the design is the basic premise of the it. Removing atmosphere in the tube to reduce drag on the "train" so it can execrate and maintain speed at a greatly reduced power requirement. Running even a light vacuum in a tube that is hundreds of miles long creates all kinds of system problems. On paper, the math works fine, the problem is real world application of the design. The tube will require hundreds of valves in the system that have to completely close off the tube to maintain the vacuum. High speed train with hundreds of doors in the way that all have to open and close without failure or you have a bunch of people goo inside the train when it hits. The system will need thousands of expansion joints to compensate for expansion and contraction of the tube, any one of which could be a potential catastrophic failure point. From and engineering standpoint, this thing will be the equivalent of taking people into space.

Damn, I wish someone had told us this thing was going to require valves, seals and joints or we never would have bothered. Those things are, like, impossible.


No one is saying impossible. Almost any engineering problem can be solved with enough money and R&D. This system is just one of those things that sounds so easy to pull off, because the basic theory it is very simple, but will be a monumental undertaking to get to work safety and efficiently. Assuming they ever design in enough redundant systems to make it safe enough for people to use the thing, I personally do not believe it will ever be efficient enough to bother building a final commuter product. Which is fine. I think it is awesome that people are willing to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in R&D to see how far they can take it. You never know what kind of great tech can come out of these kinds of projects.
 
2017-10-12 11:15:36 PM  
What level of G's will acceleration cause? Then deacceleration?  Are the train cars mag-lev? Or how do they ride? With propulsion or only vacuum front (pull) and 1 atmosphere rear (push)?

Is this like a sub-orbital rocket from super-LAX (the unbuilt one in Lancaster/ Palmdale) to JFK in 1 hour?
 
2017-10-12 11:17:16 PM  

veale728: On one hand I don't know if I could ever bring myself to go in a hyperloop.

On the other hand, this has been a science fiction feature for a long time. It'll be incredible if they can make this happen.


img.fark.netView Full Size
I think this is the book I read in the 70s as a kid that described the hyperloop.
 
2017-10-12 11:32:10 PM  
Logan's Run Mazecar Scene - RESTORED with missing dialogue!
Youtube aiadqeMSzak
 
2017-10-13 12:14:13 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: Some critics have poured cold water on the hyperloop. Amtrak President Richard Anderson told CNBC recently that hyperloop systems would not be taking over rail transport anytime soon. He also added that such technology is not "realistic" right now

Also the electric car will never be a hit.  And re-using the first stage boosters of a rocket?  Clearly preposterous.  You'd have to be insane to even imagine such a thing.


The hyperloop is closer to the personal jetpack and the flying car than the electric car.

/It and solar roads are the two big recent boondoggles that sound great, but don't work even on paper.
 
2017-10-13 12:17:05 AM  

studebaker hoch: The entrepreneurial genius of Richard Branson has finally evolved into just investing in Elon Musk projects.


Branson is old. Space travel wasn't a novel idea, it's just a progression, it takes some ingenuity to get done, but that's not his doing.

Hyperloop, that takes vision. I don't see it working. Not with current technology. But then again, that's why people don't compare me to Musk.
 
2017-10-13 12:18:18 AM  

IlGreven: Marcus Aurelius: Some critics have poured cold water on the hyperloop. Amtrak President Richard Anderson told CNBC recently that hyperloop systems would not be taking over rail transport anytime soon. He also added that such technology is not "realistic" right now

Also the electric car will never be a hit.  And re-using the first stage boosters of a rocket?  Clearly preposterous.  You'd have to be insane to even imagine such a thing.

The hyperloop is closer to the personal jetpack and the flying car than the electric car.

/It and solar roads are the two big recent boondoggles that sound great, but don't work even on paper.


Yet, someday there will be a practical jet pack.
 
2017-10-13 08:22:13 PM  

Someone Else's Alt: Agreed, but the current hyper loop system design has some seriousphysics issues to overcome long before it will ever reach anything close to 700mph for extended distances.


Musk is looking at 4 meter diameter tunnels, as opposed to the traditional 10 meters.  This is a massive difference in amounts of earth moved.

This is the concept:
The Boring Company | Tunnels
Youtube u5V_VzRrSBI
 
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