Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Guardian)   As if Harvey, Irma, and Maria didn't bring enough big water: U.S. Gulf Coast going back to pucker factor 5, cuz here comes Nate   ( theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Tropical cyclone, Gulf Coast, Tropical Storm Nate, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, NHC spokesman Dennis, offshore oil rigs, northern Gulf Coast  
•       •       •

4535 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Oct 2017 at 8:20 AM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2017-10-06 07:25:32 AM  
20 votes:

PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.


The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.
2017-10-06 06:43:17 AM  
15 votes:
The fun part? This is most likely the new normal.
2017-10-06 08:13:41 AM  
12 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Heh... I built some of the control systems for some of the pumps

/If NOLA is still that fragile this long after Katrina, maybe it would be best to rebuild elsewhere
//Nature isn't nice


Nature may be fickle and cruel, but she's still a lot kinder and more predictable than humanity.
2017-10-06 07:13:25 AM  
7 votes:
nhc.noaa.govView Full Size

NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.
2017-10-06 08:15:12 AM  
6 votes:
Mother Nature is sending you Americans a message.
2017-10-06 07:47:24 AM  
6 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.

A Cat 1 isn't really all that bad, though


It's NOLA.  Any hurricane is bad for NOLA.  Hell, just a heavy rain can flood the streets if the pumps are having a bad day.
2017-10-06 11:55:44 AM  
5 votes:

Hospitaller: DarkVader: Ambivalence: MaudlinMutantMollusk: enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.

A Cat 1 isn't really all that bad, though

It's NOLA.  Any hurricane is bad for NOLA.  Hell, just a heavy rain can flood the streets if the pumps are having a bad day.

The pumps are having a bad year.

As I recall, a good chunk of them weren't working a month ago, I haven't seen a followup article about them being functional again.

Maybe they are, but somehow I suspect that's still a problem.

Supposedly 90 percent of the pumps can operate at capacity and the remaining could operate at 50 percent, if needed.


Considering "all pumps are functioning normally" was their tag line right before it was exposed that  only a handful were operating at all, I'm going to take that information with a grain of salt the size of Jupiter.
2017-10-06 08:55:22 AM  
5 votes:

pakenlon: enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.

Yeah, but "Hurricane" doesn't mean "disaster". Unless it really picks up power in the gulf, we're looking at a Cat-1 storm.

"Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days."

So the odds are the damage will be mild. The other hurricanes that hit were much much more severe.


That's like saying the Sandy Hook massacre isn't that bad because of the severity of the Vegas massacre.
2017-10-06 11:27:10 AM  
4 votes:

Resident Muslim: enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.

So "S" is storm?
H for hurricane...
And D for...devastation?

/or just drizzle?


Depression... that thing we've all been dealing with lately.
2017-10-06 08:49:29 AM  
4 votes:
Categories are based on wind only. Intense amounts of rainfall are general worse than the wind unless it's a really powerful storm.
2017-10-06 07:41:28 AM  
4 votes:

enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.


A Cat 1 isn't really all that bad, though
2017-10-06 09:11:57 AM  
3 votes:
Where are the religious wingnuts decrying this is happening because we elected a heathen to the White House?
2017-10-06 08:50:46 AM  
3 votes:
All this talk of Nate being no big deal and nothing to worry about and all the comparisons with the record season we've had so far have me convinced that NOLA is doomed.

I sure as hell wouldn't be sticking around to find out.
2017-10-06 08:23:11 AM  
3 votes:

Ambivalence: MaudlinMutantMollusk: /If NOLA is still that fragile this long after Katrina, maybe it would be best to rebuild elsewhere

I don't know if it is STILL that fragile, but I know that it used to be (even before Katrina).


Uh, I think we all knew it was that fragile before Katrina. You know, what with "Katrina" being a thing.
2017-10-06 01:02:18 PM  
2 votes:
I sent this as a link submission.
http://thecrpost.com/2017/10/05/18-amazing-photos-todays-floods-in-co​s​ta-rica/

We are in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. I'm happy that we didn't suffer too much damage, but surrounding areas have been destroyed. At least 22 people have died - between Costa Rica and Nicaragua. A few dozen here are missing. President Solis has asked for a national day of mourning.

Next week, we'll be working with the church here in town to collect goods, food and necessities for affected areas.

If you are so inclined to donate to a reputable charitable organization, I hope you will consider doing so.

Thank you.
2017-10-06 10:24:38 AM  
2 votes:

Ambivalence: MaudlinMutantMollusk: enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.

A Cat 1 isn't really all that bad, though

It's NOLA.  Any hurricane is bad for NOLA.  Hell, just a heavy rain can flood the streets if the pumps are having a bad day.


The pumps are having a bad year.

As I recall, a good chunk of them weren't working a month ago, I haven't seen a followup article about them being functional again.

Maybe they are, but somehow I suspect that's still a problem.
2017-10-06 09:44:25 AM  
2 votes:
I'm not too terribly concerned about the storm, but I am terribly concerned about the pumps.  We can barely handle a heavy afternoon rain without certain areas of the city getting 4 feet of water.  Thanks, Sewage and Water Board!  Hope everyone that decided the money for the pumps should go elsewhere gets shiat cancer.
2017-10-06 09:42:58 AM  
2 votes:
I am more worried about the pumps that drain the city than the actual hurricane. The sewage and water board of New Orleans is run like the good old days of the mob when people were getting no-show jobs like candy at Halloween. They are so pathetic that the governor is sending in the national Guard to make sure Curly, Moe, and Larry actually work. It's okay for the stooges to jerk around when there's not a hurricane bracing to hit Nola, but for now the big boys must take over.

http://www.nola.com/hurricane/index.ssf/2017/10/tropical_storm_nate_n​a​tional_g.html
2017-10-06 09:21:36 AM  
2 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.

A Cat 1 isn't really all that bad, though


Allison did $9 in damage in 2011. It was never even a hurricane. Almost twice the damage that Isabel did, which was a full Category 5 in 2003.

You were saying?
2017-10-06 09:14:43 AM  
2 votes:

dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.


Army just called for a mandatory evac of Jackson Barracks, for the record. I'd err on the side of caution these days.
2017-10-06 09:00:59 AM  
2 votes:

Mad Scientist: wooden_badger: See, Alabama? This is what you get for even considering Roy Moore.

An inch of rain and a stiff breeze (forecast for Birmingham)?  Seems like the penalty should be more severe.

/Resident of the 'ham
//Roy Moore loather
///Friday slashie trifecta


Harvey intensified much quicker than expected.  Don't be too sure it will be a CAT1.

/of course they haven't elected him YET.  Could be a warning.
2017-10-06 08:40:06 AM  
2 votes:
vignette.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size
2017-10-06 08:31:02 AM  
2 votes:
Nate is just a wet fart compared to the rest of this season.
2017-10-06 07:20:42 AM  
2 votes:

dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.


I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.
2017-10-06 12:54:00 PM  
1 vote:
Well, so much for my NDO tomorrow, as all first responders will be assisting in safely getting our Cruisin' the Coast guests out of dodge.  In 21 years I think this is the only other time we have had to condense or cancel this, even though Nate's path has shifted again (further towards Alabama).
2017-10-06 12:17:50 PM  
1 vote:

Mister Buttons: Resident Muslim: enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.

So "S" is storm?
H for hurricane...
And D for...devastation?

/or just drizzle?

Depression... that thing we've all been dealing with lately.


:)
2017-10-06 11:58:53 AM  
1 vote:
Maybe we have too many people and need to be thinned down?
2017-10-06 11:49:13 AM  
1 vote:
It's just Nate. He's gonna crash on your couch, drink all your beer and stink up the place for a while.
2017-10-06 10:46:57 AM  
1 vote:

FormlessOne: The fun part? This is most likely the new normal.


It certainly looks that way if one considers the Atlantic basin storm counts...

img.fark.netView Full Size


But the data are far less clear in the Pacific...

img.fark.netView Full Size


And not at all when one looks at the global data...

img.fark.netView Full Size
2017-10-06 10:11:29 AM  
1 vote:
"This has been a Category 5, which few people have ever even heard of -- a Category shiatting land."

No worries then, few people even heard so it's not likely to happen again, right?
2017-10-06 09:58:34 AM  
1 vote:
At least he's moving fast enough that he's not going to dump an ass ton of rain in any one spot.
2017-10-06 09:56:22 AM  
1 vote:
So, all we need now to make this a truly farky year, is for a disaster to shut down the lower california area and it's plants and ports

/so glad i bought a small car
2017-10-06 09:54:54 AM  
1 vote:

FormlessOne: The fun part? This is most likely the new normal.


Chinese hoaxes coming on a monthly basis does not sound like much fun to me.
2017-10-06 09:48:39 AM  
1 vote:
Center line of the storm is about two miles from my house.  The grass seed I recently put down will probably wash away.  Sad
2017-10-06 09:34:24 AM  
1 vote:

basicstock: Now is not the time to talk about global warming.....


That's what I said right after Houston had four feet of rain!

People kept saying "Now isn't the time to talk about climate change." So I asked them if September 20th was acceptable.

But they said no, still too soon. They insisted I choose a later date. We finally agreed on Friday, October 6th.

I knew we should have stuck with September 20th...
2017-10-06 09:03:50 AM  
1 vote:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Ambivalence: MaudlinMutantMollusk: enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.

A Cat 1 isn't really all that bad, though

It's NOLA.  Any hurricane is bad for NOLA.  Hell, just a heavy rain can flood the streets if the pumps are having a bad day.

Heh... I built some of the control systems for some of the pumps

/If NOLA is still that fragile this long after Katrina, maybe it would be best to rebuild elsewhere
//Nature isn't nice


If they redirect the Mississippi, NOLA won't be around much longer. Though, it will go out of business before it erodes completely.
2017-10-06 09:03:41 AM  
1 vote:

ExperianScaresCthulhu: Archie Goodwin: Mother Nature is sending you Americans a message.

fark, yeah.


Petroleum Pete | Robot Chicken | Adult Swim
Youtube EX6vLzjsHmk
2017-10-06 08:58:54 AM  
1 vote:

ExperianScaresCthulhu: Archie Goodwin: Mother Nature is sending you Americans a message.

fark, yeah.


I think raining lead was enough of a message.
2017-10-06 08:57:01 AM  
1 vote:
Now is not the time to talk about global warming.....
2017-10-06 08:50:29 AM  
1 vote:

enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.


Yeah, but "Hurricane" doesn't mean "disaster". Unless it really picks up power in the gulf, we're looking at a Cat-1 storm.

"Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days."

So the odds are the damage will be mild. The other hurricanes that hit were much much more severe.
2017-10-06 08:30:52 AM  
1 vote:

wooden_badger: See, Alabama? This is what you get for even considering Roy Moore.


An inch of rain and a stiff breeze (forecast for Birmingham)?  Seems like the penalty should be more severe.

/Resident of the 'ham
//Roy Moore loather
///Friday slashie trifecta
2017-10-06 08:28:45 AM  
1 vote:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.

A Cat 1 isn't really all that bad, though


Sandy was a Cat 1.  It was weird for other reasons, though.
2017-10-06 08:17:44 AM  
1 vote:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: /If NOLA is still that fragile this long after Katrina, maybe it would be best to rebuild elsewhere


I don't know if it is STILL that fragile, but I know that it used to be (even before Katrina).
2017-10-06 07:55:02 AM  
1 vote:

Ambivalence: MaudlinMutantMollusk: enry: PreMortem: dstanley: [www.nhc.noaa.gov image 850x697]
NOLA residents, *now* would be a good time to leave.

I'm no Tom Skilling, but that looks like a typical tropical storm, not a whole lot to worry about. Certainly doesn't seem to indicate it will be hurricane strength at all.

The 'H' over NOLA means hurricane.

A Cat 1 isn't really all that bad, though

It's NOLA.  Any hurricane is bad for NOLA.  Hell, just a heavy rain can flood the streets if the pumps are having a bad day.


Heh... I built some of the control systems for some of the pumps

/If NOLA is still that fragile this long after Katrina, maybe it would be best to rebuild elsewhere
//Nature isn't nice
 
Displayed 44 of 44 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report