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(Anand Tech)   Seagate shipping 12TB helium-filled hard drives, with emphasis on consumer market, almost large enough for subby's pr0n collection   ( anandtech.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Hard disk drive, drives, hard drives, consumer hard drives, Seagate, Seagate Rescue Data, Marketing, 12TB drives  
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1326 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Oct 2017 at 6:16 PM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



47 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-10-05 04:25:27 PM  
Gigglebytes indeed.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2017-10-05 04:36:28 PM  
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2017-10-05 05:03:59 PM  
How long does the helium last? I was in school in the CRT era and it was advised not to store your helium in the same room as a CRT because gas would migrate into the vacuum inside. Helium molecules (which are helium atoms) are tiny.
 
2017-10-05 05:16:38 PM  
Squeaky voice moaning is my fetish
 
2017-10-05 05:36:26 PM  
$430/12TB=$35.83/TB

img.fark.net
 
2017-10-05 05:51:10 PM  
My Seagate drive was last spotted drifting eastward on the prevailing wind
 
2017-10-05 05:54:08 PM  
So they finally caught up with Western Digital. Why is this news?
 
2017-10-05 06:20:03 PM  

vpb: Meh:

http://newatlas.com/western-digital-hgst-14tb-enterprise-hs14-hdd/5164​1/


gaslight: So they finally caught up with Western Digital. Why is this news?


because..

MrPoopyPants: $430/12TB=$35.83/TB

[img.fark.net image 413x384]

 
2017-10-05 06:23:19 PM  
I have all my movies on a 10TB hard drive. That boggles me sometimes... I remember being so impressed when 3.5" floppy disks came into existence.
 
2017-10-05 06:23:26 PM  
That's great news! **Deep breath**
That's great news.
 
2017-10-05 06:31:51 PM  
What is the purpose of the helium? Reduced air drag?
 
2017-10-05 06:38:37 PM  

revrendjim: What is the purpose of the helium? Reduced air drag?


Exactly this..

Drives don't last any longer or shorter.. Same risks and shortcomings as any other mechanical drive
 
2017-10-05 06:39:40 PM  

revrendjim: What is the purpose of the helium? Reduced air drag?


Platters spin at 100,000 rpm.  No oxygen, so the spindle doesn't catch fire.
 
2017-10-05 06:39:56 PM  

revrendjim: What is the purpose of the helium? Reduced air drag?


Strangely enough, yes.
 
2017-10-05 06:43:03 PM  

revrendjim: What is the purpose of the helium?


to fill that biatch up

/it's the second symbol on the periodic table
 
2017-10-05 06:45:51 PM  

styckx: revrendjim: What is the purpose of the helium? Reduced air drag?

Exactly this..

Drives don't last any longer or shorter.. Same risks and shortcomings as any other mechanical drive


Then why not a vacuum? The enclosure is sealed anyway.
 
2017-10-05 07:15:57 PM  

revrendjim: styckx: revrendjim: What is the purpose of the helium? Reduced air drag?

Exactly this..

Drives don't last any longer or shorter.. Same risks and shortcomings as any other mechanical drive

Then why not a vacuum? The enclosure is sealed anyway.


With a vacuum, the air will leak IN...by putting helium in there, it will decrease the rate.
 
2017-10-05 07:21:58 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-10-05 07:35:31 PM  

revrendjim: What is the purpose of the helium? Reduced air drag?


So that clowns can tie them into funny animal shapes.
 
2017-10-05 07:42:01 PM  

revrendjim: styckx: revrendjim: What is the purpose of the helium? Reduced air drag?

Exactly this..

Drives don't last any longer or shorter.. Same risks and shortcomings as any other mechanical drive

Then why not a vacuum? The enclosure is sealed anyway.


The drive heads use the ambient gas to float above the disk surface. In a vacuum they would just lie on the disk and damage the surface.
 
rka
2017-10-05 07:46:11 PM  

bonobo73: revrendjim: What is the purpose of the helium? Reduced air drag?

Platters spin at 100,000 rpm.  No oxygen, so the spindle doesn't catch fire.


7200
 
2017-10-05 07:54:15 PM  

Duke of Madness Motors: revrendjim: styckx: revrendjim: What is the purpose of the helium? Reduced air drag?

Exactly this..

Drives don't last any longer or shorter.. Same risks and shortcomings as any other mechanical drive

Then why not a vacuum? The enclosure is sealed anyway.

The drive heads use the ambient gas to float above the disk surface. In a vacuum they would just lie on the disk and damage the surface.


Thanks, I did not know that. Yay fluid dynamics.
 
2017-10-05 08:05:25 PM  
He he
 
2017-10-05 08:15:27 PM  

rka: 7200


These drives probably spin at 54 - 5800, actually. These are the SMR "shingled" drive heads that are meant for data archiving needs rather than the traditional magnetic heads that you'd find in the high capacity enterprise product lines.

SMR drives behave oddly, but for light access needs like a pool for storing all your porn or movies, they work just fine once you've given one 24 - 36 hours to fill up. Surprisingly, they do work acceptably in disk arrays, which is something that isn't necessarily true of some of the more modest capacity "Green" or "Eco"-type drives.

Also, Seagate will probably offer them vastly cheaper in External drives. Probably $299 or something.

Note too that 12TB is within spitting distance of the mathematical limit for having a hard read error for a single drive all by itself. You don't wanna use drives that big for a traditional RAID5 without adding some kind of extra parity checking.
 
2017-10-05 08:23:48 PM  

Sydney Bridges: He he


I he what you did there...
 
2017-10-05 08:43:02 PM  

likefunbutnot: rka: 7200

These drives probably spin at 54 - 5800, actually. These are the SMR "shingled" drive heads that are meant for data archiving needs rather than the traditional magnetic heads that you'd find in the high capacity enterprise product lines.

SMR drives behave oddly, but for light access needs like a pool for storing all your porn or movies, they work just fine once you've given one 24 - 36 hours to fill up. Surprisingly, they do work acceptably in disk arrays, which is something that isn't necessarily true of some of the more modest capacity "Green" or "Eco"-type drives.

Also, Seagate will probably offer them vastly cheaper in External drives. Probably $299 or something.

Note too that 12TB is within spitting distance of the mathematical limit for having a hard read error for a single drive all by itself. You don't wanna use drives that big for a traditional RAID5 without adding some kind of extra parity checking.


Hrm, interesting.

Let's say I am working with a subset of a specific kind of information - I can have exactly one hard copy if one exists, and exactly one digital copy. If I want to ensure data integrity of the digital copy, how can I ensure there will never be hard drive failure without making additional copies? Assume I'm a complete cyber nub with zero education.
 
2017-10-05 09:00:45 PM  
1TB drives, leave them unlabeled and in random places around the house. When your relatives are picking through your stuff after you die they'll have a nice surprise.
 
2017-10-05 09:25:26 PM  

kbronsito: Squeaky voice moaning is my fetish


I see you're into hentai.
 
2017-10-05 09:26:52 PM  

MrPoopyPants: $430/12TB=$35.83/TB

[img.fark.net image 413x384]


Hmm.  I still haven't filled my 4TB drive.  Could I stripe a RAID array on one 12TB drive?

/it's so stupid, it just. might. work.
 
2017-10-05 09:27:34 PM  

gaslight: So they finally caught up with Western Digital. Why is this news?


Seagate drives don't blow goats?
 
rka
2017-10-05 09:31:48 PM  

likefunbutnot: rka: 7200

These drives probably spin at 54 - 5800, actually. These are the SMR "shingled" drive heads that are meant for data archiving needs rather than the traditional magnetic heads that you'd find in the high capacity enterprise product lines.

SMR drives behave oddly, but for light access needs like a pool for storing all your porn or movies, they work just fine once you've given one 24 - 36 hours to fill up. Surprisingly, they do work acceptably in disk arrays, which is something that isn't necessarily true of some of the more modest capacity "Green" or "Eco"-type drives.

Also, Seagate will probably offer them vastly cheaper in External drives. Probably $299 or something.

Note too that 12TB is within spitting distance of the mathematical limit for having a hard read error for a single drive all by itself. You don't wanna use drives that big for a traditional RAID5 without adding some kind of extra parity checking.


The spec sheet said 7200 in the article.
 
2017-10-05 09:36:22 PM  

Mister Peejay: gaslight: So they finally caught up with Western Digital. Why is this news?

Seagate drives don't blow goats?


My experience is the exact opposite
 
rka
2017-10-05 09:52:19 PM  

NateAsbestos: Mister Peejay: gaslight: So they finally caught up with Western Digital. Why is this news?

Seagate drives don't blow goats?

My experience is the exact opposite


I've worked in the storage industry my entire career. We had a LARGE customer with our storage array. A whole 9 drive enclosure! 72GB drives! Cutting edge stuff back in the day. But they had 1000 of those enclosures.

At one point Seagate drive failures were so bad they threatened to make us replace all 9000 drives.
 
2017-10-05 10:18:26 PM  
Bear in mind, I did phrase it in the form of a question, not a statement.

/may have not my drive manufacturers mixed up
/hasn't bought a hard drive since 2010 or so
 
2017-10-05 10:40:49 PM  

casual disregard: likefunbutnot: rka: 7200

These drives probably spin at 54 - 5800, actually. These are the SMR "shingled" drive heads that are meant for data archiving needs rather than the traditional magnetic heads that you'd find in the high capacity enterprise product lines.

SMR drives behave oddly, but for light access needs like a pool for storing all your porn or movies, they work just fine once you've given one 24 - 36 hours to fill up. Surprisingly, they do work acceptably in disk arrays, which is something that isn't necessarily true of some of the more modest capacity "Green" or "Eco"-type drives.

Also, Seagate will probably offer them vastly cheaper in External drives. Probably $299 or something.

Note too that 12TB is within spitting distance of the mathematical limit for having a hard read error for a single drive all by itself. You don't wanna use drives that big for a traditional RAID5 without adding some kind of extra parity checking.

Hrm, interesting.

Let's say I am working with a subset of a specific kind of information - I can have exactly one hard copy if one exists, and exactly one digital copy. If I want to ensure data integrity of the digital copy, how can I ensure there will never be hard drive failure without making additional copies? Assume I'm a complete cyber nub with zero education.


You can't.  your bitcoins are doomed.
 
2017-10-05 11:29:30 PM  
When I was a kid, I used to work at a mom & pop hobby store with my dad part time to feed my addiction to radio controlled airplanes. Every year, come science fair season, hapless peripatetic parents would come in looking for projects for the kiddies.

One day, this guy comes in and asks me where we keep the canned helium.

My dad, ever the wit, didn't bat an eye as he said "Upstairs on the ceiling."
 
2017-10-06 12:00:18 AM  

WilderKWight: I have all my movies on a 10TB hard drive. That boggles me sometimes... I remember being so impressed when 3.5" floppy disks came into existence.


img.fark.net

Those floppy disks never worked right for me.
img.fark.net
 
2017-10-06 12:48:14 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-10-06 02:01:56 AM  

casual disregard: Let's say I am working with a subset of a specific kind of information - I can have exactly one hard copy if one exists, and exactly one digital copy. If I want to ensure data integrity of the digital copy, how can I ensure there will never be hard drive failure without making additional copies? Assume I'm a complete cyber nub with zero education.


You can can do a parity snapshot. SnapRAID is a free, cross platform tool for doing that. ZFS is another good solution since it can do both real time parity and snapshot parity, though I'm less fond of it because it's a royal PITA to expand an existing zPool. ZFS works on OpenSolaris, OpenIndiana, *BSD, Linux and OSX. Neither one of these things is completely nub-friendly, though SnapRAID is probably easier to deal with since you can just implement it with the data you already have rather than deal with migrating your data to a zPool on an OS you probably aren't familiar with and/or a configuration that's really not a default for disk drives on any OS you've used. If you're a Windows only nub, there are Storage Spaces and usually chipset support for disk mirroring, which is at least a start.

I'm not sure what this data is that you can only have as a single copy. I'd more likely advocate something like Crashplan or Backblaze for a nub. Less nub-like persons who get in to tens of terabytes of local storage should think long and hard about how cheap tapes are compared to what it takes to re-acquire tens of terabytes of user data. Having a second copy of your data sitting on a NAS is great and all but a copy of data isn't the same as incremental change tracking or some of the other good stuff a proper backup is good for.
 
2017-10-06 03:09:31 AM  
What's the biggest solid-state drive available on the market?
 
2017-10-06 04:42:44 AM  

rka: NateAsbestos: Mister Peejay: gaslight: So they finally caught up with Western Digital. Why is this news?

Seagate drives don't blow goats?

My experience is the exact opposite

I've worked in the storage industry my entire career. We had a LARGE customer with our storage array. A whole 9 drive enclosure! 72GB drives! Cutting edge stuff back in the day. But they had 1000 of those enclosures.

At one point Seagate drive failures were so bad they threatened to make us replace all 9000 drives.


I don't have a sample size of 9000 drives. But Western Digital is the only brand I've experienced a fried circuit board with.
 
2017-10-06 08:09:49 AM  

Mister Peejay: gaslight: So they finally caught up with Western Digital. Why is this news?

Seagate drives don't blow goats?


I think that part of the issue with WD is that people buy the wrong drives and wonder why they fail.

Gold = Enterprise/Data Centre
Black = Pro - High Use
Red Pro = High Use NAS
Red = NAS
Purple = Surveillance / Machine use
Blue = Entry Level

I'm convinced that this effort to be clear by having a colour coding for MTF on drives is backfiring. They should have gone with a star or numerical rating so people understand where in the quality and reliability ladder they are putting their dollars.

I was recently setting up a workstation and yep, black for the main drive and Reds for the gobs of data it generated. The store kid looked at me like I was crazy, warning me that those drives were expensive. I hate  to think how he'd been mis-advising customers.

Speaking of which, off to the store for more drives this weekend.
 
2017-10-06 08:16:37 AM  

Smoking GNU: What's the biggest solid-state drive available on the market?


Let me Google that for you.
 
2017-10-06 08:59:51 AM  
Given that it's a Seagate though, you probably won't have time to get more than ~4tb on it before it sh*ts the bed...
 
2017-10-06 11:16:31 AM  

revrendjim: styckx: revrendjim: What is the purpose of the helium? Reduced air drag?

Exactly this..

Drives don't last any longer or shorter.. Same risks and shortcomings as any other mechanical drive

Then why not a vacuum? The enclosure is sealed anyway.


You still have to keep the head and internals cooled. Thermal asparity becomes a severe issue in a vacuum.
 
2017-10-06 12:50:51 PM  

revrendjim: Then why not a vacuum? The enclosure is sealed anyway.


First off, vacuums are insulators. Not good in this case. Secondly, the manufacturing tolerance required to keep it air tight for years and years and years would make the drive very expensive. A simpler solution (apart from the fact that you don't want to use a vacuum) is to use a gas other than air; thirdly, using higher grade parts is the ultimate defence. That's why cheap hard drives sell for peanuts but enterprise grade hard drive cost three or four times the price.
 
2017-10-06 12:59:00 PM  

casual disregard: likefunbutnot: rka: 7200

These drives probably spin at 54 - 5800, actually. These are the SMR "shingled" drive heads that are meant for data archiving needs rather than the traditional magnetic heads that you'd find in the high capacity enterprise product lines.

SMR drives behave oddly, but for light access needs like a pool for storing all your porn or movies, they work just fine once you've given one 24 - 36 hours to fill up. Surprisingly, they do work acceptably in disk arrays, which is something that isn't necessarily true of some of the more modest capacity "Green" or "Eco"-type drives.

Also, Seagate will probably offer them vastly cheaper in External drives. Probably $299 or something.

Note too that 12TB is within spitting distance of the mathematical limit for having a hard read error for a single drive all by itself. You don't wanna use drives that big for a traditional RAID5 without adding some kind of extra parity checking.

Hrm, interesting.

Let's say I am working with a subset of a specific kind of information - I can have exactly one hard copy if one exists, and exactly one digital copy. If I want to ensure data integrity of the digital copy, how can I ensure there will never be hard drive failure without making additional copies? Assume I'm a complete cyber nub with zero education.


Hard drives ... always fail. I don't understand the question.
 
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