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(Gizmodo)   The vet is having difficulty discussing Mr. Whiskers' weight problem with you   ( gizmodo.com) divider line
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2699 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Oct 2017 at 6:27 AM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-10-03 03:32:05 AM  
You probably spent a lot of time thinking about what you named your cat. Maybe you came up with Mr. Felidae Cat-stro, or Meow-gusto Pinocat.

The first cat that owned me as an adult I wanted to name "Fidel" buy my GF who I lived with shot that down. So I had to settle for "Nietzsche"
 
2017-10-03 06:56:31 AM  
img.fark.net

Watermeloncat wants a higher quality of life.   :(
 
2017-10-03 07:00:29 AM  
Don't you think I'm sexy?
static.thefrisky.com
 
2017-10-03 07:06:16 AM  
A vet not being able to talk to you about your overweight animal is like an airline pilot not knowing how to put down the landing gear--it is an essential part of the job. Get a new vet.

If my Labrador is one hair over 80 lbs, I get yelled at by my vet. She is horrible. She sternly lectures me on the damage resulting from a dog's extra pounds. Then she asks questions like, "Do you want him to have a healthy life?" and "Who makes the decisions? You? Or him?" Brutal. It has only happened once. And why I'm getting a kick? His checkup was yesterday: 78.9 lbs.
 
2017-10-03 07:15:49 AM  
My kitty was taking on weight. The vet was very straightforward about it: either he cut back now, or it's diet time. Cutting back and being strict with feeding worked.
 
2017-10-03 07:32:34 AM  

maddermaxx: Don't you think I'm sexy?
[static.thefrisky.com image 639x426]


www.lolcats.com
 
2017-10-03 07:38:00 AM  
DNRTFA, but people avoiding criticism that hits to close to home shouldn't surprise anyone.
 
2017-10-03 07:39:43 AM  

fusillade762: You probably spent a lot of time thinking about what you named your cat. Maybe you came up with Mr. Felidae Cat-stro, or Meow-gusto Pinocat.

The first cat that owned me as an adult I wanted to name "Fidel" buy my GF who I lived with shot that down. So I had to settle for "Nietzsche"


Mousy Tongue
 
2017-10-03 07:44:11 AM  

August11: A vet not being able to talk to you about your overweight animal is like an airline pilot not knowing how to put down the landing gear--it is an essential part of the job. Get a new vet.

If my Labrador is one hair over 80 lbs, I get yelled at by my vet. She is horrible. She sternly lectures me on the damage resulting from a dog's extra pounds. Then she asks questions like, "Do you want him to have a healthy life?" and "Who makes the decisions? You? Or him?" Brutal. It has only happened once. And why I'm getting a kick? His checkup was yesterday: 78.9 lbs.


Our vet said "You know, Agi is getting a bit heavy... Is something going on?" Me: "Well, you know the other one has a thyroid tumor, so she's on high calorie food. If I don't put the same food out for all of them, they eat each other's food. Any ideas?" "No, that's the right thing to do."

And, 6 months after the one with the tumor died, I took Agi back for her yearly. "Yeah, she lost that weight quickly once the other passed, didn't she? She looks good now. Back on adult food?" "Yes. Now, she mostly just gnaws at the fur on her belly *points to the denuded stomach*" "You have a cat with serious OCD." "Yes, yes, I do. She prunes her belly to 1/8", and gets upset if I stop her, and it gets worse." "Hmm. Is she throwing up hairballs or anything?" "Nope." Ok, let her have at it, then. If she starts 'branching out' and it gets worse, bring her in right away."

/poor Agi... tiger striped cat with a pink, freckled belly that shows every single freckle
//and 7 toes on each paw
///good vet, though.
 
2017-10-03 08:06:47 AM  

August11: A vet not being able to talk to you about your overweight animal is like an airline pilot not knowing how to put down the landing gear--it is an essential part of the job. Get a new vet.


My cat was having trouble urinating.  It turned out she had some matting in her twat.  When the vet explained it to me, he stumbled over the word "vagina".  It struck me as very amateurish.
 
2017-10-03 08:37:33 AM  

August11: A vet not being able to talk to you about your overweight animal is like an airline pilot not knowing how to put down the landing gear--it is an essential part of the job. Get a new vet.

If my Labrador is one hair over 80 lbs, I get yelled at by my vet. She is horrible. She sternly lectures me on the damage resulting from a dog's extra pounds. Then she asks questions like, "Do you want him to have a healthy life?" and "Who makes the decisions? You? Or him?" Brutal. It has only happened once. And why I'm getting a kick? His checkup was yesterday: 78.9 lbs.


I find it more likely folks that are told by their vets and completely ignore and pretend they never heard.
 
2017-10-03 08:47:16 AM  
A couple of years ago, my vet said my cat is "a bit overweight and should cut back on her food?"
"Oh, she's fat, eh?"
"Oh no!  I would never say that.  She's just..."
"Ha ha, fatty!  I told you you were fat!  The doctor just confirmed it."

The vet (nice lady) couldn't quit giggling after that.
 
2017-10-03 09:12:04 AM  

Fano: August11: A vet not being able to talk to you about your overweight animal is like an airline pilot not knowing how to put down the landing gear--it is an essential part of the job. Get a new vet.

If my Labrador is one hair over 80 lbs, I get yelled at by my vet. She is horrible. She sternly lectures me on the damage resulting from a dog's extra pounds. Then she asks questions like, "Do you want him to have a healthy life?" and "Who makes the decisions? You? Or him?" Brutal. It has only happened once. And why I'm getting a kick? His checkup was yesterday: 78.9 lbs.

I find it more likely folks that are told by their vets and completely ignore and pretend they never heard.


Yeah, my wife and came to the marriage with a dog each.  My Chow Chow who is 12  years old, who eats once in the morning, and once at night.  Shows up and shakes her head when she is hungry.

The pug freaks out if there is no food in her dish and my wife keeps it filled.

I love the fat pug, but not good for her health, and it was a sore subject for my wife because the other dog makes sad eyes and beats her food dish on the floor.  I want the dog to live a long healthy life because I know she will be devastated if something happens.

Finally the vet showed her a pug on a respirator, because it was too fat and that sorta knocked some sense into her.

Look at Fatty McFatt Pug. Six years old and ball of butter.
img.fark.net

img.fark.net

img.fark.net
The svelte 12 year old chow who still runs like a greyhound with her ass on fire.


img.fark.net
 
2017-10-03 09:42:04 AM  
The cat isn't fat.  It is big boned.  Your just not being body positive.
 
2017-10-03 09:43:28 AM  
I blame Garfield comics for unrealistic body images for felines
 
2017-10-03 09:46:00 AM  

Muta: August11: A vet not being able to talk to you about your overweight animal is like an airline pilot not knowing how to put down the landing gear--it is an essential part of the job. Get a new vet.

My cat was having trouble urinating.  It turned out she had some matting in her twat.  When the vet explained it to me, he stumbled over the word "vagina".  It struck me as very amateurish.


img.fark.net
 
2017-10-03 09:46:58 AM  

fusillade762: You probably spent a lot of time thinking about what you named your cat. Maybe you came up with Mr. Felidae Cat-stro, or Meow-gusto Pinocat.

The first cat that owned me as an adult I wanted to name "Fidel" buy my GF who I lived with shot that down. So I had to settle for "Nietzsche"


catandgirl.com
 
2017-10-03 09:55:39 AM  
In my experience (I've had several cats over the years) the solution is quite simple: give them access to unlimited amounts of food.

When I got my current cat from the shelter, they warned me not to feed her too much because sterilised female cats have a tendency to get overweight. She was already a bit on the chubby side when I got her.  Now, almost 2 years later she's as healthy as they get, not a gram too much on her.

She gets one pouch of meat every night, and I make sure there's always kibble in her bowl. We've done this with every cat we've had, never had a fat cat. The current oldest is 17 and still going strong. As soon as they learn to trust that food is always available they stop stuffing themselves and just eat what they need.
 
2017-10-03 09:56:13 AM  
I nicknamed my cat Fat Bastard for a reason...
 
2017-10-03 10:13:09 AM  

fusillade762: You probably spent a lot of time thinking about what you named your cat. Maybe you came up with Mr. Felidae Cat-stro, or Meow-gusto Pinocat.

The first cat that owned me as an adult I wanted to name "Fidel" buy my GF who I lived with shot that down. So I had to settle for "Nietzsche"


Hah, it took me 30 seconds to name Chirpy Boy.
 
2017-10-03 10:14:38 AM  
My bf's cat came from the shelter heavy, I think about 15 lbs. the vet said a cat with her frame should be more around 9 lbs. She refuses to eat anything but dry food, so we do get her what we think is high quality weight control food (Blue Buffalo) and feed the recommended amount.

But ever since he went away for a long vacation and left several bowls of food out, she's been wolfing the food down rather than her more usual day long graze. When I checked on her while he was away, she had already eaten all the food, which should have been servings for about 2.5 days (I checked on her at 1.5).

She's a fatty.
 
2017-10-03 10:46:25 AM  
img.fark.netGandalf, 2 months after moving in. He's gotten quite the chubby belly. Total food cat-hound.
 
2017-10-03 11:37:17 AM  
img.fark.net$5 a pound for June here. We are gonna make bank I'm sure.

On a more serious note, we've fed all of out cats Science Diet dry since the early 90's and they all seem to get middle age chubby then slim down. Oldest ever got to almost 23 years. They won't even eat plain cooked chicken, go figure.
 
2017-10-03 11:57:51 AM  

Cyclonic Cooking Action: Science Diet dry


That's what we feed our cats. Princess, who had a semi-feral adolescence, is trim and uses the kibble only as a supplement to her diet of birds and rodents and who knows what else. I think she's maybe 9 pounds?

Gray Matter, on the other hand, was hand-raised from mere days old by a student in a veterinary tech program and was bottle-fed. He's probably 18 pounds or so, probably should be 3 or 4 less than that.
 
2017-10-03 12:06:11 PM  

mjones73: I nicknamed my cat Fat Bastard for a reason...


Ditto. I've got Fat Bastard, Stinky and Butthead.  Two of them are in the 13-15 lb range.

//they're just big boned!
 
2017-10-03 12:09:13 PM  
The vet had no problem telling me my little Jiggy girl was fat and needed to lose weight.

I told him I preferred to describe her as "hawk-proof" and that losing weight might make her subject to predation.  He didn't think it was funny.
 
2017-10-03 12:13:49 PM  

Gary-L: A couple of years ago, my vet said my cat is "a bit overweight and should cut back on her food?"
"Oh, she's fat, eh?"
"Oh no!  I would never say that.  She's just..."
"Ha ha, fatty!  I told you you were fat!  The doctor just confirmed it."

The vet (nice lady) couldn't quit giggling after that.


Same, our vet wasn't addressing it well, "she could be a couple lbs lighter." My thing was, she was a kitten, and has grown into her body, and I wasn't sure what her adult weight should be. But after the vet told us, the roommate and I started shiat talking the cat in the office (she's food obsessed).
 
2017-10-03 12:16:04 PM  
Sarah Jessica Farker:

June up there was found in a tree covered in sap around 8 weeks and given to me. She had some touch of feral, but doesn't exhibit any violence now. I guess I always figure with shelter or abandoned cats, go for it, the most you need to worry about things now is where to take a nap.

That said, I don't want them to be morbidly obese either.
 
2017-10-03 12:38:39 PM  
(heavy breathing)
 
2017-10-03 01:25:44 PM  
Stop feeding your cats crappy grain-filled and dried food.  Cats don't need grain.  Look at the labels and see how much is in most of the well-known brands.  Cats don't need that much farking grain every day.  I don't need that much grain every day.  It's in there because it's a cheapass filler.

My cats when I was growing up ate it.  I looked at pictures of them the other day and was amazed how overweight they look next to my current cat.  He's holding steady at around 8~9 pounds...I'm sad that we didn't know better.  He also doesn't graze.  Quarter of a 3-oz can of gooshyfood every few hours.  If you're at work and can't come home to do that, get him a timed feeder.  It's your cat's quality of life here.

On top of that, a diet of only dried food will dehydrate your cat, who gets (is supposed to get) a large amount of his daily water intake from his prey.  Drinking water from his bowl is not enough, especially as cats have a low thirst drive to begin with.  In the long run this is a contributing factor to renal failure, a really common and painful death for older cats...it may not be preventable, but you can at least do what you can to slow it down.

My vet told me nothing about any of this.  Recommended the Science Diet kidney food for my guy.  Fortunately he won't eat it anyway.  I went ahead and researched the most reputable sources I could find, and still took the info with a grain of salt.  My buddy's coat is soft and sleek.  His weight is good.  He's outlived my other cats, and he's still surprising me with how resilient he is, for now.  I hope he stays that way, and I'm doing my very best for him.

Poor kitties. :(
 
2017-10-03 02:09:26 PM  
Mine just went to the vet 3 days ago. They both weigh in at ~10 lbs, which the vet said is their target weight. My experience is similar to BorgDrone's. I free feed Iam's dry kibble and they get an evening treat of hairball treats. For the most part, they don't eat more than they need.  They don't freak out when the dish is empty cause they know that more will be along shortly.
 
2017-10-03 02:20:58 PM  
one source is the vet that says use Science Diet
one source is online that says "Vets are paid to tell you that but don't really know, use blue buffalo instead"
yet another source says "the only way to properly feed your cat is to grind up food yourself and add supplements to it"
and it's not like you can really even trust the ingredients list (remember when chinese sourced food poisoned all those pets, bet they didn't list "poison" on the ingredients), and it's unregulated anyway, so whats the point of trusting an ingredients list?

I'm preparing to go the home made food route, in the mean time I split my cats diet between science diet, blue buffalo, and various can foods
/he's a little fat
//don't know if home made will work because he doesn't eat "people food"
 
2017-10-03 02:25:57 PM  

BorgDrone: In my experience (I've had several cats over the years) the solution is quite simple: give them access to unlimited amounts of food.

When I got my current cat from the shelter, they warned me not to feed her too much because sterilised female cats have a tendency to get overweight. She was already a bit on the chubby side when I got her.  Now, almost 2 years later she's as healthy as they get, not a gram too much on her.

She gets one pouch of meat every night, and I make sure there's always kibble in her bowl. We've done this with every cat we've had, never had a fat cat. The current oldest is 17 and still going strong. As soon as they learn to trust that food is always available they stop stuffing themselves and just eat what they need.


Congratulations on your 17-year-old!

We have several cats and that's the way we do it around here. Dry kibble (grain-free low carb/low glycemic) is always available, and a small amount of wet food twice a day. Our only "fat cat" is a twice-daily insulin dependent diabetic who came from an abusive situation. He will starve himself rather than eat any of the diabetic prescription foods; we ultimately decided its about quality-of-life. On our current routine his blood sugar and attitude are stable, which greatly improves everyone's quality of life. (Politely stated, he can be an iron-willed uncooperative asshole if you are on his sh*tlist.)

/All of our kids are rescues or the offspring of a rescue.
 
2017-10-03 02:26:01 PM  
I have a vet with a poster on the wall that has cat body types numbered 1 through 5. 5 is obese, 4 is plump, 3 is average, 2 is skinny, and 1 is nothing but skin and bones. He has the owner point to what number they think their cat is, and the last cat I had was an easy 4, trending toward 5.

Keeping almost any cat at a regular weight is easy. Cut back on the food you feed them. Don't leave food out 24/7 because sometimes cats will eat out of boredom. I got my cat's weight down by feeding her 1/4 cup at night right before bedtime, and 1/4 cup in the morning when I left for work only if the bowl was empty. If she didn't eat all of the food by the time of the morning feeding, I'd leave that for her and then give her a few nibbles when I got home from work when the bowl was empty. She slimmed right down to being a 2-3 on the chart without any trouble.
 
2017-10-03 02:43:15 PM  
FWIW, I have been feeding my two cats Simply Nourish dey food for the past couple of years.  Before then, it was Taste of the Wild.  This last time around I bought the salmon flavored Simply Nourish and they went nuts the first three days.  I use a kibble dispenser for them and each day I came home it was empty.  They've since mellowed but I'm glad I found something they really crave.  I give them wet food as well, but since they also roam outdoors they tend to feed on the occasional mouse or field rat.
 
2017-10-03 03:21:01 PM  
All cats differ, and my four are free feed dry (grain free/low carb) and a 3oz can of wet food divided between them morning and night.  Knowing that food is always out, they nibble a bit, and go away. Vet says they are all fine for their age/physical issues.  7,7,9 &11 years old.
 
2017-10-03 03:44:23 PM  
Of the twelve cats I've had over the years, I always left food out for them to eat whenever they wanted it, and none of them ever got fat. Maybe I've been buying lousy cat food. A least it wasn't bad for them; they all lived to be 16 or more and one even got to age 20.
 
2017-10-03 04:43:31 PM  

mjones73: I nicknamed my cat Fat Bastard for a reason...


He ate a baby?
 
2017-10-03 05:16:16 PM  

Panatheist: one source is the vet that says use Science Diet
one source is online that says "Vets are paid to tell you that but don't really know, use blue buffalo instead"
yet another source says "the only way to properly feed your cat is to grind up food yourself and add supplements to it"
and it's not like you can really even trust the ingredients list (remember when chinese sourced food poisoned all those pets, bet they didn't list "poison" on the ingredients), and it's unregulated anyway, so whats the point of trusting an ingredients list?

I'm preparing to go the home made food route, in the mean time I split my cats diet between science diet, blue buffalo, and various can foods
/he's a little fat
//don't know if home made will work because he doesn't eat "people food"


It's tricky, I agree.  But there are most certainly brands that are better for your cat than others.  People do a lot of research into these companies -- again, taken with a grain of salt as to how valid that research is.

I figure the best I can hope for is anything that doesn't contain:
Grains
Corn
Rice
Wheat gluten
Cornstarch
Soy flour
Carrageenan (This one's iffy.  I'm not entirely sure about the validity of this being bad for a cat, but why have it there if you don't need it?)
Minimal amounts of filler crap like blueberries and kale (wtf, kale)
Fish (increased chance of tainted food supply; fish isn't good for cats anyway)

And yeah, that's a long list.

My guy eats Fancy Feast Classic.  Yeah, okay, Fancy Feast.  But looking at the label, it's one of the foods I've found to have the least amount of desirable stuff in it.  The by-products...ehh...don't really like that, but it doesn't have carrageenan etiher.  And it's easy to purchase.

Other decent ones:
Weruva
Wellness
Nature's Variety Instinct (Limited Ingredient varieties)

https://www.reviews.com/cat-food/

A better food list.

http://consciouscat.net/2012/03/22/the-best-food-for-your-cat/

It seems like a laundry list of stuff to fill, but there are decent foods out there.  Maybe not perfect, but at least we're trying our best.
 
2017-10-03 09:26:19 PM  
I keep a coffee cup in the bag of kitty kibble and give him one of those in the morning. If you keep his bowl full, he eats till he pukes.

img.fark.net
 
2017-10-03 09:47:19 PM  

fusillade762: You probably spent a lot of time thinking about what you named your cat. Maybe you came up with Mr. Felidae Cat-stro, or Meow-gusto Pinocat.

The first cat that owned me as an adult I wanted to name "Fidel" buy my GF who I lived with shot that down. So I had to settle for "Nietzsche"


Our cat is named Max.  Because he was large when he was a kitten, and he has six toes and paws like snowshoes.

That was 15 years ago, he's an old fatass now.  No need to sugarcoat it, he's got more lard than a year's worth of corn pone.
 
2017-10-03 09:56:49 PM  
Cyclonic Cooking Action:
On a more serious note, we've fed all of out cats Science Diet dry since the early 90's and they all seem to get middle age chubby then slim down. Oldest ever got to almost 23 years. They won't even eat plain cooked chicken, go figure.

So let me tell ya about the time we switched our cats to Bil-Jac.  Cats being an adult male (maybe 2-3, very muscular recently-adopted stray of about 15lb) and an adolescent.  Litterbox is in basement, master bedroom is on second floor.  I'm in the ground-floor livingroom.

I hear my mom shout "OH MY GOD" from her bedroom.  About ten seconds later, Butch (the adult cat) moseys up the basement stairs with a kind of sheepish, scared look on his face.

Ten-fifteen seconds after that, the wave of odor rolls up the basement stairs in some kind of oily fog of doom.

Apparently the litterbox was near the cold-air return from the master bedroom so she got the death fog first.

That was the first and last day we fed the cats Bil-Jac.
 
2017-10-03 11:11:27 PM  
Animal obesity is 100% animal abuse.
 
2017-10-03 11:15:52 PM  
My vet was very forward in discussing fatcat's obesity issue. Fact was she said " this is the beginning of the end", three months later he died in my hands. Taught me to watch quality and portions with kitty food, stay away from corn based cat food...
 
2017-10-03 11:29:03 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Animal obesity is 100% animal abuse.


It's not as simple as calories in/calories out
 
2017-10-04 12:12:41 AM  
Mister Peejay:

Avoid Bil-Jac noted. ;)
 
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