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(Gizmodo)   Scientists come unanimously to the conclusion that homeopathic medicine is complete nonsense. Still no cure for cancer, homeopathic or otherwise   ( gizmodo.com) divider line
    More: Obvious  
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1146 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Oct 2017 at 4:30 PM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-10-03 02:56:28 AM  
cannabis cures cancer.

/thread
 
2017-10-03 06:37:13 AM  

Teufelaffe: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/w3Xl4_VnoPI]


I love that show so much.
<slight threadjack>
I couldn't help but think of this one ... Bawdy Hospital
Bawdy 70s Hospital -That Mitchell and Webb Look BBC Two
Youtube i6bOr5VWo5Y
 
2017-10-03 07:36:56 AM  

wejash: This Just In....it is 1930 News day?


Saying it was 1930 news is like saying man landing on the news is 2017 news.

/Where is the fist of Buzz when you need it anyways.
//Its job is far from done.
 
2017-10-03 07:44:31 AM  
If homeopathic medicine works, toss a bottle into Lake Mead.  If everyone downstream is cured then homeopathy is demonstrated.  Otherwise it is falsified.

---

img.fark.net

 
2017-10-03 09:37:05 AM  
Fortunately, my magnetic bracelet is still keeping my humors in balance.
 
2017-10-03 09:39:46 AM  

AppleOptionEsc: Homeopathy is slightly better than believing in magical creatures, as you might accidentally eat or do something healthy and help your body fight a disease or ailment. Has to be better than praying the demons out, as those usually result in child homicide and or adult kidnap and assault charges.


I said more reasonable, not "better".  At least the idea of pixies and fairy dust has the definitional possibility of the "unprovable".  In a twisted way, you're basically just believing in an untestable philosophy or a vague religion that cannot be definitely disproven (can't prove a negative).

Homeopathy is falsifiable.  And it has failed so completely in its claims that it's difficult not to mock those that buy into it.  Those that do are typically people who have not read the basic history and formulation of the concept.  Once they do, they tend to stare with a little bit of concern and horror at themselves, and quietly walk away from it.

But yes, magical creatures tend to be more damaging to society, overall.
 
2017-10-03 12:39:10 PM  

Flappyhead: Short Victoria's War: [img.fark.net image 735x643]
/not really homeopathy
//but that makes it even more powerful!

Of course people who are vaccinated are more likely to use heroin.  They're more likely to live long enough to start using it.


It's an indisputable fact that every drug addict started out by doing milk.   Don't give them milk!
 
2017-10-03 12:41:38 PM  

Khellendros: AppleOptionEsc: Homeopathy is slightly better than believing in magical creatures, as you might accidentally eat or do something healthy and help your body fight a disease or ailment. Has to be better than praying the demons out, as those usually result in child homicide and or adult kidnap and assault charges.

I said more reasonable, not "better".  At least the idea of pixies and fairy dust has the definitional possibility of the "unprovable".  In a twisted way, you're basically just believing in an untestable philosophy or a vague religion that cannot be definitely disproven (can't prove a negative).

Homeopathy is falsifiable.  And it has failed so completely in its claims that it's difficult not to mock those that buy into it.  Those that do are typically people who have not read the basic history and formulation of the concept.  Once they do, they tend to stare with a little bit of concern and horror at themselves, and quietly walk away from it.

But yes, magical creatures tend to be more damaging to society, overall.


Magical creatures do not exist and therefore cannot cause harm to anything.
Human nature and the desire to manipulate and control others causes all of societies issues.
 
2017-10-03 12:43:00 PM  
I have trouble explaining homeopathy to people.  They think it's a form of "old timey" naturopathy, rather than fairly recent pseudoscience.  I explain water memory and molecules and dilution, and they think I'm making it up because it sounds like ridiculous bullshiat.  That's because it IS ridiculous bullshiat.

So my new go-to strategy is to borrow their phone and call up the Wikipedia entry and make them read the ridiculous bullshiat themselves, while I walk away shaking my head.
 
2017-10-03 02:17:11 PM  

Herr Flick's Revenge: Magical creatures do not exist and therefore cannot cause harm to anything.


Pardon me, I suppose I should phrase my responses to deal with pedants that are being willfully obnoxious.

Belief in magical creatures is the root cause of all sorts of harm.  Better?

Herr Flick's Revenge: Human nature and the desire to manipulate and control others causes all of societies issues.


Yes, which is a predictably useless response that does absolutely nothing to diagnose or solve any problem.  It's a give-up response.
 
2017-10-03 02:32:29 PM  
I read that as "homoerotic medicine" and got very confused.
 
2017-10-03 02:40:30 PM  
The problem with homeopathy is with the fanatics AND the critics taking the definition to a ridiculous extreme. The original theory behind it has some merit. The definition that is so very wrong is that you need to dilute it beyond any functionality, which started out of fear because the original ingredients were considered poisons. The original postulate makes sense: Given a set of symptoms that your body isn't handling as well as you'd like, find some chemical(s) that produce those symptoms in a healthy person. Give that to the patient in a small enough dose to barely affect them. The idea is that your body will activate whatever natural defenses it has against that example, and those defenses will also affect the disease you want to cure. A perfectly reasonable postulate, completely lost in the noise of fanatics and critics who defend their already settled worldview, each accusing the other of not having an open mind. Can you be labeled an idiot when you are just plain unconscious?
 
2017-10-03 03:01:37 PM  

spaceman375: The original theory behind it has some merit.


No, it doesn't.  Spend 10 minutes reading up on how and why Hahnemann created the idea.  It has no merit.  None.

spaceman375: Given a set of symptoms that your body isn't handling as well as you'd like, find some chemical(s) that produce those symptoms in a healthy person. Give that to the patient in a small enough dose to barely affect them. The idea is that your body will activate whatever natural defenses it has against that example,


This is the position of ignorant people trying to peddle the idea that vaccines are basically homeopathy.... and ignoring all of the basic ideas of what an immune response is.  Nothing in homeopathy works.  At all.  It's the same hand-waving that Deepak Chopra does when he uses the word "quantum" to peddle his bullshiat.

Then you add in succussion, "memory of water", and tons of stand ins to daze and confuse the populace into believing in miasma.  In the end, there is no of the apparent curative agent, the agent doesn't do anything resembling what they claim it does, and there's no viable mechanism of action for healing.

So no, it has no merit.  In base hypothesis and in practice.
 
2017-10-03 04:13:56 PM  
How else is the chiropractor going to make the next boat payment?
 
2017-10-03 04:29:21 PM  

Khellendros: Then you add in succussion, "memory of water", and tons of stand ins to daze and confuse the populace into believing in miasma.  In the end, there is no of the apparent curative agent, the agent doesn't do anything resembling what they claim it does, and there's no viable mechanism of action for healing.


This is exactly the extremist definition I said is bullshiat. Thanks for reading. FAIL
 
2017-10-03 04:45:35 PM  

spaceman375: Khellendros: Then you add in succussion, "memory of water", and tons of stand ins to daze and confuse the populace into believing in miasma.  In the end, there is no of the apparent curative agent, the agent doesn't do anything resembling what they claim it does, and there's no viable mechanism of action for healing.

This is exactly the extremist definition I said is bullshiat. Thanks for reading. FAIL


Can you find and link to any definition of "homeopathy" that DOESN'T include water memory and succession?
 
2017-10-03 05:04:27 PM  
This is exactly the extremist definition I said is bullshiat. Thanks for reading. FAIL

Can you find and link to any definition of "homeopathy" that DOESN'T include water memory and succession?


And another "I know it all already" comes out of the woodwork. How about the entire section on "Hahnemann's concept" in wikipedia. Gee, that was SO HARD.  It does mention extreme dilution, but only after pointing out that this concept (not the bullshiat one that has you so dazzled) has existed since at least 400BC.

Just admit it, you are so convinced that you are right, of course you don't need to pay attention to the world outside of your own mind.
 
2017-10-03 07:52:22 PM  

spaceman375: This is exactly the extremist definition I said is bullshiat. Thanks for reading. FAIL

Can you find and link to any definition of "homeopathy" that DOESN'T include water memory and succession?

And another "I know it all already" comes out of the woodwork. How about the entire section on "Hahnemann's concept" in wikipedia. Gee, that was SO HARD.  It does mention extreme dilution, but only after pointing out that this concept (not the bullshiat one that has you so dazzled) has existed since at least 400BC.

Just admit it, you are so convinced that you are right, of course you don't need to pay attention to the world outside of your own mind.


LOL!  For a while, I did actually think you were serious.  Good bait.  :)
 
2017-10-03 08:04:30 PM  

Khellendros: spaceman375: The original theory behind it has some merit.

No, it doesn't.  Spend 10 minutes reading up on how and why Hahnemann created the idea.  It has no merit.  None.

spaceman375: Given a set of symptoms that your body isn't handling as well as you'd like, find some chemical(s) that produce those symptoms in a healthy person. Give that to the patient in a small enough dose to barely affect them. The idea is that your body will activate whatever natural defenses it has against that example,

This is the position of ignorant people trying to peddle the idea that vaccines are basically homeopathy.... and ignoring all of the basic ideas of what an immune response is.  Nothing in homeopathy works.  At all.  It's the same hand-waving that Deepak Chopra does when he uses the word "quantum" to peddle his bullshiat.

Then you add in succussion, "memory of water", and tons of stand ins to daze and confuse the populace into believing in miasma.  In the end, there is no of the apparent curative agent, the agent doesn't do anything resembling what they claim it does, and there's no viable mechanism of action for healing.

So no, it has no merit.  In base hypothesis and in practice.


Oliver Wendell Holmes already proved Hahnemann stole homeopathy from an Irishman named Butler in the 1600s.  He just renamed it and marketed the idea.
Homeopathy isn't like vaccines at all.  Many modern vaccines don't contain anything close to the bacteria or virus that causes the illness (subunit vaccines), nor are they diluted or prescribed as a treatment to match individual visually perceived symptoms or patients thoughts on their complaint.  Remember, in homeopathy there is no germ theory.
Go to five homeopaths and expect five entirely different recommendations.  Go to an MD and expect to hear the same thing for most problems and a practical recommendation.
 
2017-10-03 10:00:20 PM  
Homeopathetic
 
2017-10-03 10:22:15 PM  

spaceman375: This is exactly the extremist definition I said is bullshiat. Thanks for reading. FAIL


Ok, so you have no idea what homeopathy is, or you're weakening the basics of it for your own agenda.  Succusion and memory of water isn't an "extremist" definition.  It's literally 100% of the modern explanation for what homeopathy is and why they claim it works.  In the case of memory of water, it was invented specifically because it was proven through atomic theory that they don't have a single atom or molecule of the "curative" substance in the resulting solution/pill.

You clearly need to spend more time studying this, not reading two paragraphs off of Wikipedia and poorly referencing them.

spaceman375: Just admit it, you are so convinced that you are right, of course you don't need to pay attention to the world outside of your own mind.


Yes.  In fact the topic of my ethics paper to graduate college was homeopathy. Not that it's hard to research and study.  Other pseudo scientific bullshiat like psychics and pyramid power are more complex (and have more plausible explanations).  The most calm and charitable explanation of homeopathy - using the facts it purports - should bring nothing but rolled eyes and laughs from someone with a basic education.  It's that bad.

Northern: Homeopathy isn't like vaccines at all.


Correct.  However many supporters of homeopathy attempt to claim that vaccines are basically homeopathy - a "dilution" of the virus.  It, again, is total bullshiat.  But they love to twist the facts.
 
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