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(Newsweek)   So, the Florida nursing home where ten residents died may have tried to fudge the paperwork a bit   ( newsweek.com) divider line
    More: Followup, health care administration, Temperature, Illness, Miami, Health care, medical records, Fahrenheit, Nursing  
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5847 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Sep 2017 at 1:29 AM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



36 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-09-21 11:14:39 PM  
"The state's health care administration agency also revoked the home's license, calling the facility a failure to its patients"

That's a good start, now when are the charges coming?

/I know, "haha ya right"
 
2017-09-21 11:28:14 PM  
I want to know what the place's record was like pre-hurricane.

They made a lot of calls for help to places they had been told to call and got nothing.

If you want to look at systemic issues consider what is Florida's minimum staffing ratio and the qualifications to work there.  Bet they are crappy because that will minimize the cost of the facility...which is largely paid with Medicaid money.  And the company only makes money by cutting corners - and everyone knows deep down that is true and pretends it isn't.

So you get places that barely do the job in good circumstances.  Add a hurricane and lost power.  Then no one calls them back or comes to help.  And your poorly-trained overworked - but cheap - team just collapses.

Yeah, the staff screwed the pooch.  But Florida likely set the conditions for something like this to happen, I wager.
 
2017-09-22 12:16:04 AM  
AHCA said the facility made a number of inaccurate entries to medical records that were recorded hours after a nurse visited patients, the most egregious included a patient who was resting in bed with unlabored breathing but had already died.

Well, there was no labored breathing happening.
 
2017-09-22 12:23:44 AM  

wejash: I want to know what the place's record was like pre-hurricane.

They made a lot of calls for help to places they had been told to call and got nothing.

If you want to look at systemic issues consider what is Florida's minimum staffing ratio and the qualifications to work there.  Bet they are crappy because that will minimize the cost of the facility...which is largely paid with Medicaid money.  And the company only makes money by cutting corners - and everyone knows deep down that is true and pretends it isn't.

So you get places that barely do the job in good circumstances.  Add a hurricane and lost power.  Then no one calls them back or comes to help.  And your poorly-trained overworked - but cheap - team just collapses.

Yeah, the staff screwed the pooch.  But Florida likely set the conditions for something like this to happen, I wager.


If they made the choice to staff at bare minimum levels and failed to offer proper training, that's on them.  If their business model required them to underserve their patients, perhaps they shouldn't have been in business in the first place.

The biggest failure is that there was a functioning hospital literally next door.  Instead of waiting while the heat rose and residents were clearly in distress they could have easily moved those patients into the hospital before they passed the point of no return.
 
2017-09-22 12:30:38 AM  
This is why Trump and the GOP should put in Life Time Limits for medicare and Medicaid.

They should make room for younger people that can contribute to society instead of being a parasite.
 
2017-09-22 01:34:51 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2017-09-22 01:35:13 AM  

Boo_Guy: "The state's health care administration agency also revoked the home's license, calling the facility a failure to its patients"

That's a good start, now when are the charges coming?

/I know, "haha ya right"


Too busy prosecuting people who left their dogs tied to trees probably.
 
2017-09-22 01:35:54 AM  

Boo_Guy: That's a good start, now when are the charges coming?


I am sure "Nurse A" and "Lunch cook B" will be facing charges.

The people responsible for this hellish facility? ... Eh. No. Probably not.
 
2017-09-22 01:39:49 AM  
Nursing home fudge?
No.
 
2017-09-22 01:41:29 AM  

puffy999: Boo_Guy: That's a good start, now when are the charges coming?

I am sure "Nurse A" and "Lunch cook B" will be facing charges.

The people responsible for this hellish facility? ... Eh. No. Probably not.


$ome people are more equal than others.
 
2017-09-22 01:50:40 AM  

King Something: puffy999: Boo_Guy: That's a good start, now when are the charges coming?

I am sure "Nurse A" and "Lunch cook B" will be facing charges.

The people responsible for this hellish facility? ... Eh. No. Probably not.

$ome people are more equal than others.


Million Dollar Man / Money Inc. Theme
Youtube FMe-OUImcqE
 
2017-09-22 02:18:51 AM  

wejash: I want to know what the place's record was like pre-hurricane.

They made a lot of calls for help to places they had been told to call and got nothing.

If you want to look at systemic issues consider what is Florida's minimum staffing ratio and the qualifications to work there.  Bet they are crappy because that will minimize the cost of the facility...which is largely paid with Medicaid money.  And the company only makes money by cutting corners - and everyone knows deep down that is true and pretends it isn't.

So you get places that barely do the job in good circumstances.  Add a hurricane and lost power.  Then no one calls them back or comes to help.  And your poorly-trained overworked - but cheap - team just collapses.

Yeah, the staff screwed the pooch.  But Florida likely set the conditions for something like this to happen, I wager.


This. Sounds like they were understaffed and the nurse was behind on charting. That's the new norm.
 
2017-09-22 02:26:28 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: wejash: I want to know what the place's record was like pre-hurricane.

They made a lot of calls for help to places they had been told to call and got nothing.

If you want to look at systemic issues consider what is Florida's minimum staffing ratio and the qualifications to work there.  Bet they are crappy because that will minimize the cost of the facility...which is largely paid with Medicaid money.  And the company only makes money by cutting corners - and everyone knows deep down that is true and pretends it isn't.

So you get places that barely do the job in good circumstances.  Add a hurricane and lost power.  Then no one calls them back or comes to help.  And your poorly-trained overworked - but cheap - team just collapses.

Yeah, the staff screwed the pooch.  But Florida likely set the conditions for something like this to happen, I wager.

If they made the choice to staff at bare minimum levels and failed to offer proper training, that's on them.  If their business model required them to underserve their patients, perhaps they shouldn't have been in business in the first place.

The biggest failure is that there was a functioning hospital literally next door.  Instead of waiting while the heat rose and residents were clearly in distress they could have easily moved those patients into the hospital before they passed the point of no return.


Heh, on their website they tout being across the street from the hospital as a big plus.

"The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills is located directly across the street from Hollywood's Memorial Regional Hospital, so in case of an emergency our patients have access to even more of the finest health care at all hours of the day and night."

http://hollywoodhillsrehab.com/facility.shtml
 
2017-09-22 02:38:46 AM  
FTFA: "Scott argues that despite the facility's calls to his phone, the electric company and other officials, the home should have called 911 first"

Congratulations. Hollywood Hell nursing home has succeeded in making me agree with Rick Scott.
 
2017-09-22 02:46:40 AM  

davin: wejash: I want to know what the place's record was like pre-hurricane.

They made a lot of calls for help to places they had been told to call and got nothing.

If you want to look at systemic issues consider what is Florida's minimum staffing ratio and the qualifications to work there.  Bet they are crappy because that will minimize the cost of the facility...which is largely paid with Medicaid money.  And the company only makes money by cutting corners - and everyone knows deep down that is true and pretends it isn't.

So you get places that barely do the job in good circumstances.  Add a hurricane and lost power.  Then no one calls them back or comes to help.  And your poorly-trained overworked - but cheap - team just collapses.

Yeah, the staff screwed the pooch.  But Florida likely set the conditions for something like this to happen, I wager.

This. Sounds like they were understaffed and the nurse was behind on charting. That's the new norm.


Aside:

But will this be on the 2018 Democratic ticket as a major talking point against the Republican Party? As in, Florida's practices leading to this event, which is THRICE as bad as Benghazi?

I doubt they'll even bring it up. Sadly.
 
2017-09-22 03:26:10 AM  
Wait, so the place where uncared for old people get thrown into, ends up not caring for them?!

/trigger-warning
//please rate
 
2017-09-22 03:29:07 AM  

Igor Jakovsky: TuteTibiImperes: wejash: I want to know what the place's record was like pre-hurricane.

They made a lot of calls for help to places they had been told to call and got nothing.

If you want to look at systemic issues consider what is Florida's minimum staffing ratio and the qualifications to work there.  Bet they are crappy because that will minimize the cost of the facility...which is largely paid with Medicaid money.  And the company only makes money by cutting corners - and everyone knows deep down that is true and pretends it isn't.

So you get places that barely do the job in good circumstances.  Add a hurricane and lost power.  Then no one calls them back or comes to help.  And your poorly-trained overworked - but cheap - team just collapses.

Yeah, the staff screwed the pooch.  But Florida likely set the conditions for something like this to happen, I wager.

If they made the choice to staff at bare minimum levels and failed to offer proper training, that's on them.  If their business model required them to underserve their patients, perhaps they shouldn't have been in business in the first place.

The biggest failure is that there was a functioning hospital literally next door.  Instead of waiting while the heat rose and residents were clearly in distress they could have easily moved those patients into the hospital before they passed the point of no return.

Heh, on their website they tout being across the street from the hospital as a big plus.

"The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills is located directly across the street from Hollywood's Memorial Regional Hospital, so in case of an emergency our patients have access to even more of the finest health care at all hours of the day and night."

http://hollywoodhillsrehab.com/facility.shtml


Alright.  fark these people.
 
2017-09-22 04:17:06 AM  
Less oversight should fix this up directly.
 
2017-09-22 05:03:05 AM  

70xlrt: Less oversight should fix this up directly.


What needs fixing? This is the kind of outcome libs want with Obamacare.  Better actually, since it didn't need any time be spent by a death panel. It's a win-win.
 
2017-09-22 06:16:34 AM  
I'm... uh... trying to wrap my head around this one.
"We keep looking for help and nobody can help us!"
"Okay, okay, okay. Damnit! What can we do... Wait, I've got it! Quick, falsify the charts!"

img.fark.net
 
2017-09-22 06:55:04 AM  

70xlrt: Less oversight should fix this up directly.


And tort reform.  Don't forget tort reform.
 
2017-09-22 06:57:17 AM  

Benjimin_Dover: 70xlrt: Less oversight should fix this up directly.

What needs fixing? This is the kind of outcome libs want with Obamacare.  Better actually, since it didn't need any time be spent by a death panel. It's a win-win.


Yeah fark you and your horse
 
2017-09-22 06:58:17 AM  
The Hollywood Hills nursing home, 20 miles north of Miami, lost power like millions of homes and businesses in the state during the storm, creating a hotbox for residents in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma.

They must have just baked in there!
img.fark.net
 
2017-09-22 08:17:47 AM  
There is a big meeting in Tallahassee this morning on changes to the Assisted Living Facility laws for emergency power. They want the ACs running to keep the temp at or below 81 degrees for 96 hours. That will be very very difficult in these older facilities.
 
2017-09-22 08:27:33 AM  

RJReves: FTFA: "Scott argues that despite the facility's calls to his phone, the electric company and other officials, the home should have called 911 first"

Congratulations. Hollywood Hell nursing home has succeeded in making me agree with Rick Scott.


While I agree with the statement that they should have called 911 first, I can't agree with the blame-shifting underneath it.  Scott specifically gave out his number, then ignored calls to it, and instead blamed the caller for calling him.
 
2017-09-22 08:35:28 AM  

midigod: RJReves: FTFA: "Scott argues that despite the facility's calls to his phone, the electric company and other officials, the home should have called 911 first"

Congratulations. Hollywood Hell nursing home has succeeded in making me agree with Rick Scott.

While I agree with the statement that they should have called 911 first, I can't agree with the blame-shifting underneath it.  Scott specifically gave out his number, then ignored calls to it, and instead blamed the caller for calling him.


My main question re: him giving out his number.

What the hell was calling him even supposed to accomplish? Was he going to disrobe in a phone booth and swoop to the rescue?
 
2017-09-22 08:36:14 AM  

Goimir: 70xlrt: Less oversight should fix this up directly.

And tort reform.  Don't forget tort reform.


May I have the raspberry tort please?
 
2017-09-22 09:05:15 AM  

puffy999: Boo_Guy: That's a good start, now when are the charges coming?

I am sure "Nurse A" and "Lunch cook B" will be facing charges.

The people responsible for this hellish facility? ... Eh. No. Probably not.


How could investors or owners be held responsible? They just wanted to give as little as and get the most back possible. On the backs of the helpless. Like good capitalists.

That's why we have smart concepts like corporate veils to protect those who profit on misery. I mean, we couldn't have a functioning society otherwise!
 
2017-09-22 09:07:35 AM  

midigod: RJReves: FTFA: "Scott argues that despite the facility's calls to his phone, the electric company and other officials, the home should have called 911 first"

Congratulations. Hollywood Hell nursing home has succeeded in making me agree with Rick Scott.

While I agree with the statement that they should have called 911 first, I can't agree with the blame-shifting underneath it.  Scott specifically gave out his number, then ignored calls to it, and instead blamed the caller for calling him.


That is really messed up.  Our governor doesn't care, and at least keeps his phone number a secret so it doesn't look like he cares.
 
2017-09-22 09:57:07 AM  

RJReves: midigod: RJReves: FTFA: "Scott argues that despite the facility's calls to his phone, the electric company and other officials, the home should have called 911 first"

Congratulations. Hollywood Hell nursing home has succeeded in making me agree with Rick Scott.

While I agree with the statement that they should have called 911 first, I can't agree with the blame-shifting underneath it.  Scott specifically gave out his number, then ignored calls to it, and instead blamed the caller for calling him.

My main question re: him giving out his number.

What the hell was calling him even supposed to accomplish? Was he going to disrobe in a phone booth and swoop to the rescue?


Isn't that why they elected SuperNude? Or was he supposed to put on a costume before swooping?
 
2017-09-22 09:57:38 AM  
This would not have happened in Texas, where they keep their old people in cool waist-deep water.
 
2017-09-22 10:21:00 AM  

WelldeadLink: RJReves: midigod: RJReves: FTFA: "Scott argues that despite the facility's calls to his phone, the electric company and other officials, the home should have called 911 first"

Congratulations. Hollywood Hell nursing home has succeeded in making me agree with Rick Scott.

While I agree with the statement that they should have called 911 first, I can't agree with the blame-shifting underneath it.  Scott specifically gave out his number, then ignored calls to it, and instead blamed the caller for calling him.

My main question re: him giving out his number.

What the hell was calling him even supposed to accomplish? Was he going to disrobe in a phone booth and swoop to the rescue?

Isn't that why they elected SuperNude? Or was he supposed to put on a costume before swooping?


25.media.tumblr.com
 
2017-09-22 10:44:19 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: wejash: I want to know what the place's record was like pre-hurricane.

They made a lot of calls for help to places they had been told to call and got nothing.

If you want to look at systemic issues consider what is Florida's minimum staffing ratio and the qualifications to work there.  Bet they are crappy because that will minimize the cost of the facility...which is largely paid with Medicaid money.  And the company only makes money by cutting corners - and everyone knows deep down that is true and pretends it isn't.

So you get places that barely do the job in good circumstances.  Add a hurricane and lost power.  Then no one calls them back or comes to help.  And your poorly-trained overworked - but cheap - team just collapses.

Yeah, the staff screwed the pooch.  But Florida likely set the conditions for something like this to happen, I wager.

If they made the choice to staff at bare minimum levels and failed to offer proper training, that's on them.  If their business model required them to underserve their patients, perhaps they shouldn't have been in business in the first place.

The biggest failure is that there was a functioning hospital literally next door.  Instead of waiting while the heat rose and residents were clearly in distress they could have easily moved those patients into the hospital before they passed the point of no return.


As long as all you want is a head in a noose, you win.

You found the bad guy.

And if you fail to ask the question of whether it is POSSIBLE to do the job really well on the Medicaid reimbursement rate in the state then you are walking away from the next nursing home disaster and pretending "making sn example" will do shiat to protect patients.

You just said, in effect, throwing an opiod street dealer in jail solves the problem.  But don't want to look at the drug company pushing opiods in the first place because...............why?
 
2017-09-22 12:20:17 PM  
It's torts all the way down.
 
2017-09-22 01:26:56 PM  
Large groups of old and sick  people have deaths? You don't say?
 
2017-09-22 02:36:34 PM  

wejash: TuteTibiImperes: wejash: I want to know what the place's record was like pre-hurricane.

They made a lot of calls for help to places they had been told to call and got nothing.

If you want to look at systemic issues consider what is Florida's minimum staffing ratio and the qualifications to work there.  Bet they are crappy because that will minimize the cost of the facility...which is largely paid with Medicaid money.  And the company only makes money by cutting corners - and everyone knows deep down that is true and pretends it isn't.

So you get places that barely do the job in good circumstances.  Add a hurricane and lost power.  Then no one calls them back or comes to help.  And your poorly-trained overworked - but cheap - team just collapses.

Yeah, the staff screwed the pooch.  But Florida likely set the conditions for something like this to happen, I wager.

If they made the choice to staff at bare minimum levels and failed to offer proper training, that's on them.  If their business model required them to underserve their patients, perhaps they shouldn't have been in business in the first place.

The biggest failure is that there was a functioning hospital literally next door.  Instead of waiting while the heat rose and residents were clearly in distress they could have easily moved those patients into the hospital before they passed the point of no return.

As long as all you want is a head in a noose, you win.

You found the bad guy.

And if you fail to ask the question of whether it is POSSIBLE to do the job really well on the Medicaid reimbursement rate in the state then you are walking away from the next nursing home disaster and pretending "making sn example" will do shiat to protect patients.

You just said, in effect, throwing an opiod street dealer in jail solves the problem.  But don't want to look at the drug company pushing opiods in the first place because...............why?


I think there is plenty of blame to go around. It's all bad.

I wonder what percentage of Republicans that support draconian cuts to Medicaid understand that it funds such a huge percentage of end-of-life care? By supporting cuts, they are supporting exactly this kind of outcome. Worse, I wonder if they understand that if Medicaid funding for nursing home care goes away, the elderly will become the problem of their adult children, financially? At least if they aren't heartless enough to just let them die.
 
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