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(Yahoo)   Kicker has field goal attempt blocked, so he just kicks the ball again - immediately   ( sports.yahoo.com) divider line
    More: Weird, American football, kick, scrimmage kick, free kick, legal kick, field goal, English-language films, kicker Tyler Hopkins  
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2550 clicks; posted to Sports » on 17 Sep 2017 at 7:49 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-09-17 01:25:18 AM  
Kid sure did better than Garo Yepremian in Super Bowl VII.
 
2017-09-17 05:37:45 AM  
ARTICLE 4. A player shall not kick a loose ball, a forward pass or a ball being held for a place kick by an opponent. These illegal acts do not change the status of the loose ball or forward pass; but if the player holding the ball for a place kick loses possession during a scrimmage down, it is a fumble and a loose ball; if during a free kick, the ball remains dead (A.R. 8-7-2-IV and A. R. 9-4-1-XI).
 
2017-09-17 07:29:17 AM  
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
What the hell was that? 
That was a dropkick. 
Dropkick? 
Dropkick. 
How much is that worth? 
Three points. 
Three points? 
Three points.
 
2017-09-17 08:06:14 AM  

Bob The Nob: [encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com image 190x265]
What the hell was that? 
That was a dropkick. 
Dropkick? 
Dropkick. 
How much is that worth? 
Three points. 
Three points? 
Three points.


I've been fooled about 37 times in recent years by getting excited when I see "the longest yard" on the cable TV guide.    Always the Adam Sandler version.
 
2017-09-17 08:16:38 AM  

sprong89: ARTICLE 4. A player shall not kick a loose ball, a forward pass or a ball being held for a place kick by an opponent. These illegal acts do not change the status of the loose ball or forward pass; but if the player holding the ball for a place kick loses possession during a scrimmage down, it is a fumble and a loose ball; if during a free kick, the ball remains dead (A.R. 8-7-2-IV and A. R. 9-4-1-XI).


From TFA: According to the NCAA rule book, "any free kick or scrimmage kick continues to be a kick until it is caught or recovered by a player or becomes dead." The kick was never recovered by anyone. Also according to the rule book, "it is a legal kick if it is made by Team A -  in or behind the neutral zone during a scrimmage down before team possession changes." Possession never changed and the kick was made behind the neutral zone.

Looks like the officials made the correct call.
 
2017-09-17 08:20:32 AM  

sprong89: ARTICLE 4. A player shall not kick a loose ball, a forward pass or a ball being held for a place kick by an opponent. These illegal acts do not change the status of the loose ball or forward pass; but if the player holding the ball for a place kick loses possession during a scrimmage down, it is a fumble and a loose ball; if during a free kick, the ball remains dead (A.R. 8-7-2-IV and A. R. 9-4-1-XI).


From TFA: Also according to the rule book, "it is a legal kick if it is made by Team A -  in or behind the neutral zone during a scrimmage down before team possession changes." Possession never changed and the kick was made behind the neutral zone.

If it doesn't break the plane of the line of scrimmage - it appears it can be kicked again.
Also - is there any kind of free kick other than a kick-off in modern American football?
 
2017-09-17 08:33:09 AM  

TommyDeuce: Also - is there any kind of free kick other than a kick-off in modern American football?


There is, but you'll probably never see it in your lifetime.

On the play after a fair catch, the receiving team has the option to take a free kick. I believe it's an untimed down, and I know the defense can not attempt to block the kick. There would need to be a perfect confluence of events to make taking the free kick a viable option, but the free kick after a fair catch is in the rulebook.
 
2017-09-17 08:46:29 AM  

Gonz: TommyDeuce: Also - is there any kind of free kick other than a kick-off in modern American football?

There is, but you'll probably never see it in your lifetime.

On the play after a fair catch, the receiving team has the option to take a free kick. I believe it's an untimed down, and I know the defense can not attempt to block the kick. There would need to be a perfect confluence of events to make taking the free kick a viable option, but the free kick after a fair catch is in the rulebook.


A free kick is also in play after a safety
 
2017-09-17 09:16:00 AM  

Tom_Slick: A free kick is also in play after a safety


True, but you can't score points from it.
 
2017-09-17 10:21:40 AM  

Man On A Mission: sprong89: ARTICLE 4. A player shall not kick a loose ball, a forward pass or a ball being held for a place kick by an opponent. These illegal acts do not change the status of the loose ball or forward pass; but if the player holding the ball for a place kick loses possession during a scrimmage down, it is a fumble and a loose ball; if during a free kick, the ball remains dead (A.R. 8-7-2-IV and A. R. 9-4-1-XI).

From TFA: According to the NCAA rule book, "any free kick or scrimmage kick continues to be a kick until it is caught or recovered by a player or becomes dead." The kick was never recovered by anyone. Also according to the rule book, "it is a legal kick if it is made by Team A -  in or behind the neutral zone during a scrimmage down before team possession changes." Possession never changed and the kick was made behind the neutral zone.

Looks like the officials made the correct call.


It looked like a roughing the kicker after the second kick.  They should have gotten a fresh set of downs.
 
2017-09-17 10:26:12 AM  
D3 football is fun
 
2017-09-17 10:49:43 AM  
Doug Flutie nods, smiles, and quietly walks away.
 
2017-09-17 11:22:21 AM  

TommyDeuce: sprong89: ARTICLE 4. A player shall not kick a loose ball, a forward pass or a ball being held for a place kick by an opponent. These illegal acts do not change the status of the loose ball or forward pass; but if the player holding the ball for a place kick loses possession during a scrimmage down, it is a fumble and a loose ball; if during a free kick, the ball remains dead (A.R. 8-7-2-IV and A. R. 9-4-1-XI).

From TFA: Also according to the rule book, "it is a legal kick if it is made by Team A -  in or behind the neutral zone during a scrimmage down before team possession changes." Possession never changed and the kick was made behind the neutral zone.

If it doesn't break the plane of the line of scrimmage - it appears it can be kicked again.
Also - is there any kind of free kick other than a kick-off in modern American football?


A fair catch kick is considered a free kick by the national high school football rules organization (NHSFA or something similar), but not by the NFL.  I have no idea what the NCAA would say.
 
2017-09-17 11:27:07 AM  

Man On A Mission: sprong89: ARTICLE 4. A player shall not kick a loose ball, a forward pass or a ball being held for a place kick by an opponent. These illegal acts do not change the status of the loose ball or forward pass; but if the player holding the ball for a place kick loses possession during a scrimmage down, it is a fumble and a loose ball; if during a free kick, the ball remains dead (A.R. 8-7-2-IV and A. R. 9-4-1-XI).

From TFA: According to the NCAA rule book, "any free kick or scrimmage kick continues to be a kick until it is caught or recovered by a player or becomes dead." The kick was never recovered by anyone. Also according to the rule book, "it is a legal kick if it is made by Team A -  in or behind the neutral zone during a scrimmage down before team possession changes." Possession never changed and the kick was made behind the neutral zone.

Looks like the officials made the correct call.


You didn't read the whole article
 
2017-09-17 11:45:26 AM  
This is one of the times the rule book should be changed to allow it.

Heads-up play by the kicker. I'd say it should be worth extra, frankly. 4 points instead of 3
 
2017-09-17 12:27:46 PM  
That was cool
 
2017-09-17 12:49:16 PM  

UNC_Samurai: TommyDeuce: sprong89: ARTICLE 4. A player shall not kick a loose ball, a forward pass or a ball being held for a place kick by an opponent. These illegal acts do not change the status of the loose ball or forward pass; but if the player holding the ball for a place kick loses possession during a scrimmage down, it is a fumble and a loose ball; if during a free kick, the ball remains dead (A.R. 8-7-2-IV and A. R. 9-4-1-XI).

From TFA: Also according to the rule book, "it is a legal kick if it is made by Team A -  in or behind the neutral zone during a scrimmage down before team possession changes." Possession never changed and the kick was made behind the neutral zone.

If it doesn't break the plane of the line of scrimmage - it appears it can be kicked again.
Also - is there any kind of free kick other than a kick-off in modern American football?

A fair catch kick is considered a free kick by the national high school football rules organization (NHSFA or something similar), but not by the NFL.  I have no idea what the NCAA would say.


It is a free kick, even in the NFL.

If the opponent cannot attempt to block the kick, it's a free kick. That's what a free kick is.
 
2017-09-17 12:56:03 PM  

Gonz: TommyDeuce: Also - is there any kind of free kick other than a kick-off in modern American football?

There is, but you'll probably never see it in your lifetime.

On the play after a fair catch, the receiving team has the option to take a free kick. I believe it's an untimed down, and I know the defense can not attempt to block the kick. There would need to be a perfect confluence of events to make taking the free kick a viable option, but the free kick after a fair catch is in the rulebook.


It does happen
 
2017-09-17 01:41:04 PM  

This text is now purple: UNC_Samurai: TommyDeuce: sprong89: ARTICLE 4. A player shall not kick a loose ball, a forward pass or a ball being held for a place kick by an opponent. These illegal acts do not change the status of the loose ball or forward pass; but if the player holding the ball for a place kick loses possession during a scrimmage down, it is a fumble and a loose ball; if during a free kick, the ball remains dead (A.R. 8-7-2-IV and A. R. 9-4-1-XI).

From TFA: Also according to the rule book, "it is a legal kick if it is made by Team A -  in or behind the neutral zone during a scrimmage down before team possession changes." Possession never changed and the kick was made behind the neutral zone.

If it doesn't break the plane of the line of scrimmage - it appears it can be kicked again.
Also - is there any kind of free kick other than a kick-off in modern American football?

A fair catch kick is considered a free kick by the national high school football rules organization (NHSFA or something similar), but not by the NFL.  I have no idea what the NCAA would say.

It is a free kick, even in the NFL.

If the opponent cannot attempt to block the kick, it's a free kick. That's what a free kick is.


The NFL rulebook considers a fair catch kick to be distinct from a free kick:

http://operations.nfl.com/the-rules/2017-nfl-rulebook/

Article 18, sections 4 and 5.
 
2017-09-17 02:23:31 PM  

Muta: Man On A Mission: sprong89: ARTICLE 4. A player shall not kick a loose ball, a forward pass or a ball being held for a place kick by an opponent. These illegal acts do not change the status of the loose ball or forward pass; but if the player holding the ball for a place kick loses possession during a scrimmage down, it is a fumble and a loose ball; if during a free kick, the ball remains dead (A.R. 8-7-2-IV and A. R. 9-4-1-XI).

From TFA: According to the NCAA rule book, "any free kick or scrimmage kick continues to be a kick until it is caught or recovered by a player or becomes dead." The kick was never recovered by anyone. Also according to the rule book, "it is a legal kick if it is made by Team A -  in or behind the neutral zone during a scrimmage down before team possession changes." Possession never changed and the kick was made behind the neutral zone.

Looks like the officials made the correct call.

It looked like a roughing the kicker after the second kick.  They should have gotten a fresh set of downs.


I think once the defense touches the ball the roughing the kicker call is negated...
/not a referee
 
2017-09-17 08:04:04 PM  

Gonz: TommyDeuce: Also - is there any kind of free kick other than a kick-off in modern American football?

There is, but you'll probably never see it in your lifetime.

On the play after a fair catch, the receiving team has the option to take a free kick. I believe it's an untimed down, and I know the defense can not attempt to block the kick. There would need to be a perfect confluence of events to make taking the free kick a viable option, but the free kick after a fair catch is in the rulebook.


I did, way back with Bears versus Packers, pretty sure it was Bears kicking the FG.
 
2017-09-18 08:44:31 PM  

sprong89: ARTICLE 4. A player shall not kick a loose ball, a forward pass or a ball being held for a place kick by an opponent. These illegal acts do not change the status of the loose ball or forward pass; but if the player holding the ball for a place kick loses possession during a scrimmage down, it is a fumble and a loose ball; if during a free kick, the ball remains dead (A.R. 8-7-2-IV and A. R. 9-4-1-XI).


I've seen players kick a fumbled ball out of their end zone to take the safety points unread of the touchdown, why do they not call that a penalty?
 
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