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(Lincoln Journal Star)   Not News: Nebraska traffic engineer tests driverless car technology. News: The system uses electric coils in the pavement and only costs $500. Fark: In 1960   ( journalstar.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, driverless car, Personal rapid transit, straight course, guide wire, Automobile, driverless downtown shuttle, radio meter, test drive  
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1477 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Sep 2017 at 11:20 AM (12 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-09-13 09:10:10 AM  
RCA engineers had installed a pair of small coils on the bumper and a small meter in the cab of the car.
...When he got too close to the car ahead, a bell sounded and a light flashed on. When he dropped back the signals stopped. He held his course by observing the swinging needle of the meter.


Implanting electrical coils in cars' front and rear bumpers is one things. Implanting them in pedestrians is another . . .
 
2017-09-13 09:35:53 AM  
Also, $500 to lay the wires in a small section of road.  Now multiply that by how many miles of road need to be covered to make this worthwhile and it's not going to be quite as cheap.

Now I can see one of the self-driving car companies wanting the government to step in and pay for the sensors in the road because that would make it a hell of a lot easier on them, cheaper too.  But as a taxpayer.  I'd rather the money be spent on public transportation.
 
2017-09-13 09:38:51 AM  

draypresct: RCA engineers had installed a pair of small coils on the bumper and a small meter in the cab of the car.
...When he got too close to the car ahead, a bell sounded and a light flashed on. When he dropped back the signals stopped. He held his course by observing the swinging needle of the meter.

Implanting electrical coils in cars' front and rear bumpers is one things. Implanting them in pedestrians is another . . .


Came here to say this.
 
2017-09-13 09:43:39 AM  

dittybopper: draypresct: RCA engineers had installed a pair of small coils on the bumper and a small meter in the cab of the car.
...When he got too close to the car ahead, a bell sounded and a light flashed on. When he dropped back the signals stopped. He held his course by observing the swinging needle of the meter.

Implanting electrical coils in cars' front and rear bumpers is one things. Implanting them in pedestrians is another . . .

Came here to say this.


Just let the cars do it.
 
2017-09-13 10:35:38 AM  

BizarreMan: dittybopper: draypresct: RCA engineers had installed a pair of small coils on the bumper and a small meter in the cab of the car.
...When he got too close to the car ahead, a bell sounded and a light flashed on. When he dropped back the signals stopped. He held his course by observing the swinging needle of the meter.

Implanting electrical coils in cars' front and rear bumpers is one things. Implanting them in pedestrians is another . . .

Came here to say this.

Just let the cars do it.


lol
 
2017-09-13 12:02:53 PM  
Nebraska has 97,000 miles of roads.

72,000 miles of it are unpaved. This is why self-driving cars today use radar or visual systems of tracking where they are.

http://dot.nebraska.gov/media/4710/facts-roads.pdf
 
2017-09-13 12:03:18 PM  
But them're 1960 dollars which is like a billion dollars today. And there ain't enuf chargin stations fer my daily seven mile co-mute. Plus that there inferstructer ain't quipped to handle a change like that'un all at oncet. Sure, man, I'd like to have driverless cars and e-lectric vee-hicles but sincein' it all kint happen tween the time I go down ter sleep and the time I git up, what's the dern pernt of even tryin a'tal?
 
2017-09-13 12:27:27 PM  

This text is now purple: Nebraska has 97,000 miles of roads.

72,000 miles of it are unpaved. This is why self-driving cars today use radar or visual systems of tracking where they are.

http://dot.nebraska.gov/media/4710/facts-roads.pdf


The other thing is what happens when it comes time to repave the road. It's more complicated if you have to replace mechanical stuff in the asphalt. You could set up guide posts along the side of the road though. They could keep an eye out for pedestrians or other hazards and communicate with the vehicles, etc.
 
2017-09-13 12:34:42 PM  
This happened 50 farking years ago.  No one is advocating this method of driverless technology today!
 
2017-09-13 12:51:55 PM  
They posited driverless cars controlled by radio at the WORLD OF TOMORROW exhibition at the 1939
World's Fair.
 
2017-09-13 12:59:41 PM  
If JP Morgan hadn't murdered Tesla we'd all be getting broadcast power in the singularity right now!
 
2017-09-13 01:11:17 PM  
"Cost the state" doesn't say how much RCA paid.

The automation is significantly less than many "non self driving" cars have.  Modern cars warn about staying in lane and automatically break, this one automatically stays in perfectly straight lanes and warns if you need to brake.  And it also had to deal with next to zero traffic.

Cool research (for the time).  But was there really a point in automating driving in straight lines with almost no traffic?
 
2017-09-13 01:25:37 PM  
In case you're wondering what could go wrong, see Science Fiction TheatreThe Phantom Car.
 
2017-09-13 01:59:44 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: "Cost the state" doesn't say how much RCA paid.

The automation is significantly less than many "non self driving" cars have.  Modern cars warn about staying in lane and automatically break, this one automatically stays in perfectly straight lanes and warns if you need to brake.  And it also had to deal with next to zero traffic.

Cool research (for the time).  But was there really a point in automating driving in straight lines with almost no traffic?


We could build slot car tracks
 
2017-09-13 02:10:41 PM  

BizarreMan: Also, $500 to lay the wires in a small section of road.  Now multiply that by how many miles of road need to be covered to make this worthwhile and it's not going to be quite as cheap.

Now I can see one of the self-driving car companies wanting the government to step in and pay for the sensors in the road because that would make it a hell of a lot easier on them, cheaper too.  But as a taxpayer.  I'd rather the money be spent on public transportation.


Where do these people live? Around where I live there's some roads with car swallowing pot holes. We can't keep major pot holes off the roads but I'm supposed to believe we'll get each and every road wired, reliably with this? What happens to the non-paved roads?
 
2017-09-13 02:12:55 PM  

BizarreMan: Now I can see one of the self-driving car companies wanting the government to step in and pay for the sensors in the road because that would make it a hell of a lot easier on them, cheaper too.  But as a taxpayer.  I'd rather the money be spent on public transportation.


I wouldn't mind the government paying for it.  It will help everyone as this would eliminate red lights and stop signs all together.  Nobody would be blindly waiting for a minute for the light to change.  Traffic in heavy areas would be amazing as you don't get the 65mph to 10 mph to 65mph for no freaking reason.
 
2017-09-13 02:20:57 PM  

Creepy Lurker Guy: In case you're wondering what could go wrong, see Science Fiction Theatre, The Phantom Car.


Thanks.  That was enjoyable.
 
2017-09-13 03:16:03 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: "Cost the state" doesn't say how much RCA paid.

The automation is significantly less than many "non self driving" cars have.  Modern cars warn about staying in lane and automatically break, this one automatically stays in perfectly straight lanes and warns if you need to brake.  And it also had to deal with next to zero traffic.

Cool research (for the time).  But was there really a point in automating driving in straight lines with almost no traffic?


Shrug, sometimes progress is made in tiny increments
 
2017-09-13 03:40:32 PM  

Fano: yet_another_wumpus: "Cost the state" doesn't say how much RCA paid.

The automation is significantly less than many "non self driving" cars have.  Modern cars warn about staying in lane and automatically break, this one automatically stays in perfectly straight lanes and warns if you need to brake.  And it also had to deal with next to zero traffic.

Cool research (for the time).  But was there really a point in automating driving in straight lines with almost no traffic?

We could build slot car tracks


I had a slot car track from not much later than 1960 (it was a "Jackie Stuart" edition).  Not a good idea, unless you are building it like the Disneyworld racetrack.
/gave up on that too quickly
//didn't really get the idea of slowing down
///later had the "slotless" system.  Really pointless except for attacking the third car, inventing crashes.
 
2017-09-13 04:20:06 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-09-13 05:56:42 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: "Cost the state" doesn't say how much RCA paid.

The automation is significantly less than many "non self driving" cars have.  Modern cars warn about staying in lane and automatically break, this one automatically stays in perfectly straight lanes and warns if you need to brake.  And it also had to deal with next to zero traffic.

Cool research (for the time).  But was there really a point in automating driving in straight lines with almost no traffic?


This was a test, so the driver was following signals which could be automated with them fancy relay things. At the time, using a relay to trigger brakes or left-right steering was clever automation. It was not limited to straight lines, as it can also follow a curved line (there are devices which have been doing that for decades).

The hard parts would have been in automating the roadway. They intended to operate it like a railroad, where entry into each section of road would be detected by coils in the pavement, and no other cars would be allowed in that section until it was empty.

At an intersection, proper wires could be activated to guide a vehicle toward its destination, something which surely could be easily handled by the driver having inserted the proper cam to emit signals for the route to the destination. Simple. Other than storing dozens of cams in your automobile-house.
 
2017-09-13 06:20:53 PM  

WelldeadLink: yet_another_wumpus: "Cost the state" doesn't say how much RCA paid.

The automation is significantly less than many "non self driving" cars have.  Modern cars warn about staying in lane and automatically break, this one automatically stays in perfectly straight lanes and warns if you need to brake.  And it also had to deal with next to zero traffic.

Cool research (for the time).  But was there really a point in automating driving in straight lines with almost no traffic?

This was a test, so the driver was following signals which could be automated with them fancy relay things. At the time, using a relay to trigger brakes or left-right steering was clever automation. It was not limited to straight lines, as it can also follow a curved line (there are devices which have been doing that for decades).

The hard parts would have been in automating the roadway. They intended to operate it like a railroad, where entry into each section of road would be detected by coils in the pavement, and no other cars would be allowed in that section until it was empty.

At an intersection, proper wires could be activated to guide a vehicle toward its destination, something which surely could be easily handled by the driver having inserted the proper cam to emit signals for the route to the destination. Simple. Other than storing dozens of cams in your automobile-house.


That's even cooler (but probably not cool enough to bother to work/fund farther).  The real question becomes: are accidents typically caused by steering failure to follow road conditions, or for other reasons.  Such a system would presumably prevent wrong way drivers (assuming it wouldn't allow manual steering.  I'd be impressed if such a system could warn a driver to break sufficiently at dangerous turns, that seems a more likely cause of going offroad.

The only real buyers I can imagine are control freaks.  It would be the ideal means of limiting someone's access to locations by limiting the cams they had available.  "She'll have fun, fun, fun until her daddy takes her cams away".  The 1960s would never be the same.
 
2017-09-13 08:12:30 PM  
Based on these posts, I guess the biggest problem would be the brakes break?
 
2017-09-13 10:01:18 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: The only real buyers I can imagine are control freaks.  It would be the ideal means of limiting someone's access to locations by limiting the cams they ...


In the 1960s, control logic was difficult but something like pre-calculated cam patterns wasn't. Now, a car's navigation computer could chat with the road to request left-right turns as needed.

Actually, you can find recent experiments using buried wires or magnets for road-following. But people prefer to solve the road-following problem in ways which will function on unmodified roads. We now have enough computational power to be able to tackle that problem.
 
2017-09-13 10:58:01 PM  
Not looking it up now, but there was some further study in the late 80s early 90s in California that was using imbedded magnets in the road etc. They were using multiple autonomous cars drafting etc.

/how did that work?
 
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