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(The Hill)   Baltimore's schools are failing, and it's criminal as life is basically season four of The Wire for most students   ( thehill.com) divider line
    More: Scary, High school, Baltimore, Baltimore High School, Baltimore City Schools, Project Baltimore, Project Baltimore Investigation, Baltimore school, dismal academic proficiency  
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3313 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Sep 2017 at 2:16 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-09-13 08:38:45 AM  
Article makes several vague claims. It is a tragedy, though. If a system fails a child's cognitive development, it is no different than a hit to the head with a baseball bat: both remove consciousness.
 
2017-09-13 09:13:21 AM  
It's Maslow's Heirarchy on full display. It doesn't matter how much money you throw at an education system, if the students aren't having their basic needs met (food, shelter, safety), then they aren't going to succeed in school.
 
2017-09-13 09:17:02 AM  
The article was a long string of anecdotal claims straining to support an ideological point without evidence. For example, let's see a citation of some sort to support the idea that school-of-choice is to blame for poor outcomes 'because students flock to schools with higher social promotion rates'.

The byline explained it all:
Armstrong Williams (@ARightSide) isauthor of the brand new book, "Reawakening Virtues." Heserved as an adviser and spokesman for Dr. Ben Carson's 2016 presidential campaign
 
2017-09-13 10:08:36 AM  
Oh indeed.
 
2017-09-13 10:52:57 AM  

kevlar51: It's Maslow's Heirarchy on full display. It doesn't matter how much money you throw at an education system, if the students aren't having their basic needs met (food, shelter, safety), then they aren't going to succeed in school.


^^ This. Right here.
 
2017-09-13 02:18:33 PM  

kevlar51: It's Maslow's Heirarchy on full display. It doesn't matter how much money you throw at an education system, if the students aren't having their basic needs met (food, shelter, safety), then they aren't going to succeed in school.


So we should instead give those funds back to rich people in the form of tax cuts.
 
2017-09-13 02:20:19 PM  
Welcome to Democrat paradise.
 
2017-09-13 02:22:01 PM  

kevlar51: It's Maslow's Heirarchy on full display. It doesn't matter how much money you throw at an education system, if the students aren't having their basic needs met (food, shelter, safety), then they aren't going to succeed in school.


img.fark.netView Full Size


It's just a theory!
 
2017-09-13 02:26:34 PM  
Money can only do so much with respect to education, and I think it has reached its limitnin Baltimore.  I fear that in turn formal education has reached its limit in helping improve the outcomes for people that attend many schools in Baltimore.  Accordingly, to help dig communities in Baltimore out of the cycle of poverty and crime a solution other than (or in addition to) directly improving the education system there is needed.

What policies would help improve marriage rates and get families to buy into the importance of education and give these kids a better shot at staying out of jail and in school?
 
2017-09-13 02:27:43 PM  
Wood shop

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-09-13 02:27:46 PM  
It's been like that there for about the past forty years.
 
2017-09-13 02:29:29 PM  

Teufel Ritter: Accordingly, to help dig communities in Baltimore out of the cycle of poverty and crime a solution other than (or in addition to) directly improving the education system there is needed.


Yes, it's called, "Getting rid of the current administration in Baltimore."

Money can help students, but only if it's being spent on students and not on patronage.
 
2017-09-13 02:30:40 PM  

kevlar51: It's Maslow's Heirarchy on full display. It doesn't matter how much money you throw at an education system, if the students aren't having their basic needs met (food, shelter, safety), then they aren't going to succeed in school.


At least feed the kids three meals a day.  Breakfast in the morning, provided lunch, dinner in an afterschool program.

They are already spending in excess of $15k per pupil.  The $900 a year or so it would cost to implement a school nutrition program is a steal.

LarryDan43: kevlar51: It's Maslow's Heirarchy on full display. It doesn't matter how much money you throw at an education system, if the students aren't having their basic needs met (food, shelter, safety), then they aren't going to succeed in school.

So we should instead give those funds back to rich people in the form of tax cuts.


Not many Republicans in Baltimore...
 
2017-09-13 02:31:00 PM  

kevlar51: It's Maslow's Heirarchy on full display. It doesn't matter how much money you throw at an education system, if the students aren't having their basic needs met (food, shelter, safety), then they aren't going to succeed in school.


Oh, we're defining "success" on whether the students do well?

Get with the program. Success is based on how many administrators can better-deal themselves into 250K assistant diversity nurturing buzzword-generating deputy grant-writing consultant gigs in the suburbs.
 
2017-09-13 02:32:27 PM  
The schools aren't going to save kids that have already been failed by the parents. To my way of thinking, a failing school is one with students who show up to school ready to succeed but the school is unable to help them do that. When the school is essentially expected to be the parent and oh yeah, teach the kid, that's not a failing school. You're asking the impossible. No one wants to point the finger at the parents though because that leads to a lot of sticky questions.

The other things, people making money off of this system, that's just the predictable byproduct. There will always be people making money off what's happening, no matter what it is that's happening.
 
2017-09-13 02:33:08 PM  

August11: Article makes several vague claims. It is a tragedy, though. If a system fails a child's cognitive development, it is no different than a hit to the head with a baseball bat: both remove consciousness.


The article is wrong on the reason for the budget.  The teachers and retirees are unionized and have lifetime pension and health care.  The cost of the OPEB is massive since the federal government failed to return health care premium costs to 1990s levels per employee and retiree.  And even though inflation is only 1.8%, the health care benefit component is growing at 3-10X that rate.  Even if DeVos puts all charters in Baltimore the OPEB costs will still be there as per contract, the teacher quality will tank, and the schools will be much worse off.  They did that in the city next to my town and kept renaming the charter schools with absurd names like "Success Academy" where 90% of the students were flunking out.  Good schools have parents who have the time and resources to raise their kids and not working three minimum wage jobs plus one under the table job 7 days a week.  Solve the good jobs and health care  problem, legislate better working hours and pay ($15 minimum wage), and the schools will get better.
/It takes a village
//emails so Trump
///little finger approves
 
2017-09-13 02:33:08 PM  

kevlar51: It's Marlo's Heirarchy on full display. It doesn't matter how much money you throw at an education system, if the students aren't having their basic needs met (food, shelter, safety), then they aren't going to succeed in school.


FTFY.
 
2017-09-13 02:35:02 PM  

emarche: Teufel Ritter: Accordingly, to help dig communities in Baltimore out of the cycle of poverty and crime a solution other than (or in addition to) directly improving the education system there is needed.

Yes, it's called, "Getting rid of the current administration in Baltimore."

Money can help students, but only if it's being spent on students and not on patronage.


I can tell that you have never truly lived or experienced a progressive city.  Money is not the issue, it's the mindset of those that live there.
 
2017-09-13 02:35:29 PM  

emarche: Teufel Ritter: Accordingly, to help dig communities in Baltimore out of the cycle of poverty and crime a solution other than (or in addition to) directly improving the education system there is needed.

Yes, it's called, "Getting rid of the current administration in Baltimore."

Money can help students, but only if it's being spent on students and not on patronage.


I think money spent on students via a school budget can help, but I think Baltimore is pretty far allongnthe diminishing returns curve at this point.  Would more money directly to the students and their families help anymore?  I think credible data backs up the supposition that the welfare system as currently structured disincentivizes marriage and two-parent households.  I also think having two parents in a home is better for a child (in general; obviously having an abuser in the house is bad) than only having one.
 
2017-09-13 02:38:00 PM  

Birnone: The schools aren't going to save kids that have already been failed by the parents. To my way of thinking, a failing school is one with students who show up to school ready to succeed but the school is unable to help them do that. When the school is essentially expected to be the parent and oh yeah, teach the kid, that's not a failing school. You're asking the impossible. No one wants to point the finger at the parents though because that leads to a lot of sticky questions.

The other things, people making money off of this system, that's just the predictable byproduct. There will always be people making money off what's happening, no matter what it is that's happening.


^This.
 
2017-09-13 02:39:36 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-09-13 02:42:00 PM  

guestguy: [img.fark.net image 400x225]


holy shiat!

there's your problem, Baltimore.
 
2017-09-13 02:42:42 PM  

LarryDan43: kevlar51: It's Maslow's Heirarchy on full display. It doesn't matter how much money you throw at an education system, if the students aren't having their basic needs met (food, shelter, safety), then they aren't going to succeed in school.

So we should instead give those funds back to rich people in the form of tax cuts.


Sounds like someone wants to be REPRESENTATIVE Larry Dan (R)!

(Slides envelope of money across the table)
 
2017-09-13 02:44:21 PM  
 
2017-09-13 02:46:47 PM  

Sean VasDeferens: emarche: Teufel Ritter: Accordingly, to help dig communities in Baltimore out of the cycle of poverty and crime a solution other than (or in addition to) directly improving the education system there is needed.

Yes, it's called, "Getting rid of the current administration in Baltimore."

Money can help students, but only if it's being spent on students and not on patronage.

I can tell that you have never truly lived or experienced a progressive city.  Money is not the issue, it's the mindset of those that live there.


I have not either...would you care to expound on that?  Not being snarky, just genuinely curious.

/
 
2017-09-13 02:50:55 PM  

draypresct: The article was a long string of anecdotal claims straining to support an ideological point without evidence. For example, let's see a citation of some sort to support the idea that school-of-choice is to blame for poor outcomes 'because students flock to schools with higher social promotion rates'.

The byline explained it all:
Armstrong Williams (@ARightSide) isauthor of the brand new book, "Reawakening Virtues." Heserved as an adviser and spokesman for Dr. Ben Carson's 2016 presidential campaign


img.fark.netView Full Size


WOW.. you couldn't have scripted a better example of "shoot the messenger."    Now, before I begin dismantling the entire idea that this is just some partisan bunk... I lived in Baltimore City as a homeowner for almost 20 years.  I passed that monument of crass corruption that is the Pinderhughes building almost twice daily and have known people in and out of the "system."

The Baltimore City Public School System is nothing more than a criminal enterprise that is quite possibly the most evil organization I've ever seen.  $150,000+ for a single new private bathroom in the Director's office, $40,000,000 (FORTY MILLION DOLLARS) that just went "POOF!" about 10 years ago that no one even bothered investigating, 700+ folks JUST AT HEADQUARTERS that make north of $100,000 per year, 10% or less of kids graduating who ca actually read, shiatty conditions in the schools, no meaningful trade programs even, no expectation of success...... it's just a giant shiathole of failed policies on top of failed policies..  Of course, they aren't really "failures" because the purpose of most of the policies is lining pockets of people who don't give two shiats about the kids.   So in that sense, they are VERY successful.

The article is barely scratching the surface, but it is spot-on.   I don't give a shiat if it's Armstrong Williams, Trump, Pelosi, Clinton or Kim Jong Un writing it....

More than any other topic, this one is the most horrible one I've ever dealt with.  I actually moved out of Baltimore a couple years ago after refusing a job with the City almost entirely because of the disgusting corruption that runs through the government there... and many of the so-called civic leaders and business interests.  It's all just a Gordian knot of snakes.

The Feds should show up with bracelets for everyone in that farking building, City Hall and the BDC office.
 
2017-09-13 02:53:06 PM  
How about having pay based on student outcomes?
 
2017-09-13 02:53:58 PM  

Sean VasDeferens: emarche: Teufel Ritter: Accordingly, to help dig communities in Baltimore out of the cycle of poverty and crime a solution other than (or in addition to) directly improving the education system there is needed.

Yes, it's called, "Getting rid of the current administration in Baltimore."

Money can help students, but only if it's being spent on students and not on patronage.

I can tell that you have never truly lived or experienced a progressive city.  Money is not the issue, it's the mindset of those that live there.


Throwing money at the problem may not be the answer, however starving it of money sure as shiat doesn't solve it either. With a declining tax base and an unwillingness to provide adequate funding any effort is bound to fail.
 
2017-09-13 02:56:37 PM  

70Ford: Every day is Katrina.
http://darkroom.baltimoresun.com/2015/05/in-baltimores-sandtown-winche​ster-every-day-is-an-ongoing-katrina/
[img.fark.net image 850x566]


Riddick is a cop in Baltimore now?  Quite the fall from Lord Marshall
 
2017-09-13 02:57:08 PM  
The day I packed up my family and moved out of Baltimore City was one of the happiest days of my life.
 
2017-09-13 02:58:02 PM  

area_resident: How about having pay based on student outcomes?


What sane teacher would want to work in any deeply disadvantaged area with no buy-in from parents with respect tk the education of their children.  The best teachers in the world would probably fail in Baltimore at this point.  These kids don't have proficiency rates in reading and mathematics jobering around 10% because of bad teachers (though many bad teachers likely hide in the school system there).  These communities have devolved into areas where education isn't seen as a good thing, but is instead mocked.
 
2017-09-13 02:59:32 PM  
skylabdown: The Baltimore City Public School System is nothing more than a criminal enterprise that is quite possibly the most evil organization I've ever seen.  $150,000+ for a single new private bathroom in the Director's office, $40,000,000 (FORTY MILLION DOLLARS) that just went "POOF!" about 10 years ago that no one even bothered investigating, 700+ folks JUST AT HEADQUARTERS that make north of $100,000 per year, 10% or less of kids graduating who ca actually read, shiatty conditions in the schools, no meaningful trade programs even, no expectation of success...... it's just a giant shiathole of failed policies on top of failed policies..  Of course, they aren't really "failures" because the purpose of most of the policies is lining pockets of people who don't give two shiats about the kids.   So in that sense, they are VERY successful.

The article is barely scratching the surface, but it is spot-on.   I don't give a shiat if it's Armstrong Williams, Trump, Pelosi, Clinton or Kim Jong Un writing it....


the LA school system says "hold my beer..."
 
2017-09-13 02:59:39 PM  

70Ford: Every day is Katrina.
http://darkroom.baltimoresun.com/2015/05/in-baltimores-sandtown-winche​ster-every-day-is-an-ongoing-katrina/
[img.fark.net image 850x566]


I didn't realize Joe Satriani and Henry Rollins were Baltimore beat cops!
 
2017-09-13 02:59:55 PM  

Teufel Ritter: What policies would help improve marriage rates and get families to buy into the importance of education and give these kids a better shot at staying out of jail and in school?


Ending the Drug War.
 
2017-09-13 02:59:59 PM  

stir22: Sean VasDeferens: emarche: Teufel Ritter: Accordingly, to help dig communities in Baltimore out of the cycle of poverty and crime a solution other than (or in addition to) directly improving the education system there is needed.

Yes, it's called, "Getting rid of the current administration in Baltimore."

Money can help students, but only if it's being spent on students and not on patronage.

I can tell that you have never truly lived or experienced a progressive city.  Money is not the issue, it's the mindset of those that live there.

I have not either...would you care to expound on that?  Not being snarky, just genuinely curious.

/


Hmm.  Go get yourself an apartment and a job in B'more.  Report back to me in a year.

I grew in inner city Baltimore.  At some point I made a consiece decesion to better my lot in life.  Others in my family made a choice to not better themselves.  In the US everything about your life is a direct result of the personal choices you have made.

We grew up gathering bottles and cans and exchanging them so we could eat at the end of the day.  Even the most disadvantaged child eventually reaches adulthood and ends up being responsible for the outcome of their life.
 
2017-09-13 03:00:11 PM  

skylabdown: draypresct: The article was a long string of anecdotal claims straining to support an ideological point without evidence. For example, let's see a citation of some sort to support the idea that school-of-choice is to blame for poor outcomes 'because students flock to schools with higher social promotion rates'.

The byline explained it all:
Armstrong Williams (@ARightSide) isauthor of the brand new book, "Reawakening Virtues." Heserved as an adviser and spokesman for Dr. Ben Carson's 2016 presidential campaign

[img.fark.net image 625x473]

WOW.. you couldn't have scripted a better example of "shoot the messenger."    Now, before I begin dismantling the entire idea that this is just some partisan bunk... I lived in Baltimore City as a homeowner for almost 20 years.  I passed that monument of crass corruption that is the Pinderhughes building almost twice daily and have known people in and out of the "system."

The Baltimore City Public School System is nothing more than a criminal enterprise that is quite possibly the most evil organization I've ever seen.  $150,000+ for a single new private bathroom in the Director's office, $40,000,000 (FORTY MILLION DOLLARS) that just went "POOF!" about 10 years ago that no one even bothered investigating, 700+ folks JUST AT HEADQUARTERS that make north of $100,000 per year, 10% or less of kids graduating who ca actually read, shiatty conditions in the schools, no meaningful trade programs even, no expectation of success...... it's just a giant shiathole of failed policies on top of failed policies..  Of course, they aren't really "failures" because the purpose of most of the policies is lining pockets of people who don't give two shiats about the kids.   So in that sense, they are VERY successful.

The article is barely scratching the surface, but it is spot-on.   I don't give a shiat if it's Armstrong Williams, Trump, Pelosi, Clinton or Kim Jong Un writing it....

More than any other topic, this one is the most horrible one I'v ...


Interesting, even moreso given your experience.  Are there any answers to this?
 
2017-09-13 03:00:32 PM  

sdd2000: Sean VasDeferens: emarche: Teufel Ritter: Accordingly, to help dig communities in Baltimore out of the cycle of poverty and crime a solution other than (or in addition to) directly improving the education system there is needed.

Yes, it's called, "Getting rid of the current administration in Baltimore."

Money can help students, but only if it's being spent on students and not on patronage.

I can tell that you have never truly lived or experienced a progressive city.  Money is not the issue, it's the mindset of those that live there.

Throwing money at the problem may not be the answer, however starving it of money sure as shiat doesn't solve it either. With a declining tax base and an unwillingness to provide adequate funding any effort is bound to fail.


An unwillingness to provide adequate funding?  $16k per year per child, fourth highest in the nation, is inadequate?

I don't doubt that budget is being poorly allocated, likely going to the bloated salaries if corrupt or indifferent administrators and polotical pet projects, but the money is there.
 
2017-09-13 03:01:38 PM  

odinsposse: Teufel Ritter: What policies would help improve marriage rates and get families to buy into the importance of education and give these kids a better shot at staying out of jail and in school?

Ending the Drug War.


That would be a phenomenal first step.  I like what I have read so far about Portugal's approach to drug use.
 
2017-09-13 03:02:36 PM  

Teufel Ritter: area_resident: How about having pay based on student outcomes?

What sane teacher would want to work in any deeply disadvantaged area with no buy-in from parents with respect tk the education of their children.  The best teachers in the world would probably fail in Baltimore at this point.  These kids don't have proficiency rates in reading and mathematics jobering around 10% because of bad teachers (though many bad teachers likely hide in the school system there).  These communities have devolved into areas where education isn't seen as a good thing, but is instead mocked.



easy:

1.  this would include administrators as much or more than teachers.
2.  one would do a baseline and determine improvements from there.
 
2017-09-13 03:04:15 PM  
Well don't look to the Government
If People want Education and Healthcare, they need to do it for themselves
Hasn't the GOP made that perfectly farking clear already?
 
2017-09-13 03:05:10 PM  

area_resident: How about having pay based on student outcomes?


The school will begin holding internal auctions among teachers to get the best students into their classrooms. The fortunate few children who come from stable households with balanced meals could command top dollar. Proceeds will go to whichever political boss controls the district. Teachers who won't play ball and open up their checkbooks will be fired.

Because, R or D, that's how financial incentives work.
 
2017-09-13 03:05:16 PM  
Is it because books are like kryptonite?
Chris Rock-Black People
Youtube UvM81TNUHRE
 
2017-09-13 03:07:41 PM  
As a Baltimore resident married to a Baltimore city schoolteacher I can say for certain the following:

1. Most students in most Baltimore city schools are receiving free breakfast and free or reduced lunches. Many of the most of access to afterschool programs and also provide dinner as well. It definitely helps.
2. Anyone who tries to claim that marriage is a solution to urban poverty doesn't understand the types of stressors that poverty imposes on relationships.
3. The war on drugs has, at this point, done its utmost to render three generations of black men unemployable - criminalization of basic social activity, denial of financial assistance for school as a penalty for even the most minor of drug-related offenses, unequal treatment under law (in terms of both assumption of criminal guilt and longer sentencing). Lack of access to employment is also emotionally and mentally fatiguing, as well as emasculating.
4. School facilities in the poorest areas of the city are shiat. No air-conditioning for 90+ degree days at the beginning and end of the school year, and inadequate or unreliable heating during the middle of the school year. Not to mention crumbling infrastructure and crap resources - the students have seen what the schools look like in the better neighborhoods, and they interpret the quality of their schools is a reflection of how the city feels about their value as students and citizens.
5. Lack of community investment outside of predominantly white neighborhoods (look up "the white L and the black butterfly" if you want to know more about economic segregation in Baltimore city).
6. Terrible public transit. Well it's not all terrible - the light rail that goes out to the white suburbs, and the free buses that service the white corridors are all pretty functional. But if you're talking about a reliable way for somebody in West Baltimore to have reliable bus access to, say, Kevin Plank's new multimillion dollar UnderArmor facility (supposedly a "jobs engine)"...well, you're SOL.

The long and short of it is this: the city needs investment in jobs and infrastructure, fair housing, and criminal justice reform. Instead, the city leaders focus on policing, and tourism promotion that benefits a very narrow segment of the city's population.
 
2017-09-13 03:07:43 PM  

area_resident: Teufel Ritter: area_resident: How about having pay based on student outcomes?

What sane teacher would want to work in any deeply disadvantaged area with no buy-in from parents with respect tk the education of their children.  The best teachers in the world would probably fail in Baltimore at this point.  These kids don't have proficiency rates in reading and mathematics jobering around 10% because of bad teachers (though many bad teachers likely hide in the school system there).  These communities have devolved into areas where education isn't seen as a good thing, but is instead mocked.


easy:

1.  this would include administrators as much or more than teachers.
2.  one would do a baseline and determine improvements from there.


I'm not completely opposed to the idea, but I worry that Baltimore is in such a state that improving education without somehow spurring families to start giving a crap is almost impossible.  That is, I don't know that the best teacher in the world could improve from the baseline without a broader effort in the community.

In a city not as FUBAR as Baltimore, education itself could help gradually improve the community by improving lifetime outcomes for students. I guess I fear Baltimore is so close to dead and has such little regard for education in vast swathes of the community there that better teachers alone will not move the needle at this point.
 
d23 [BareFark]
2017-09-13 03:10:54 PM  

skylabdown: $150,000+ for a single new private bathroom in the Director's office, $40,000,000 (FORTY MILLION DOLLARS) that just went "POOF!" about 10 years ago that no one even bothered investigating, 700+ folks JUST AT HEADQUARTERS that make north of $100,000 per year,


I think focus on administrators with huge salaries that never actually teach or do anything is a HUGE problem in all public school systems.  Usually it is also the last thing to be talked about (if it gets talked about at all).
 
2017-09-13 03:12:53 PM  

odinsposse: Teufel Ritter: What policies would help improve marriage rates and get families to buy into the importance of education and give these kids a better shot at staying out of jail and in school?

Ending the Drug War.


This really can't be stressed enough.
 
2017-09-13 03:13:40 PM  
Kids just need their mothers to home school them while their dad is at work.
 
2017-09-13 03:15:09 PM  
Still some good work going on:

https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/step_2017/
 
2017-09-13 03:15:46 PM  

RevCarter: As a Baltimore resident married to a Baltimore city schoolteacher I can say for certain the following:

1. Most students in most Baltimore city schools are receiving free breakfast and free or reduced lunches. Many of the most of access to afterschool programs and also provide dinner as well. It definitely helps.
2. Anyone who tries to claim that marriage is a solution to urban poverty doesn't understand the types of stressors that poverty imposes on relationships.
3. The war on drugs has, at this point, done its utmost to render three generations of black men unemployable - criminalization of basic social activity, denial of financial assistance for school as a penalty for even the most minor of drug-related offenses, unequal treatment under law (in terms of both assumption of criminal guilt and longer sentencing). Lack of access to employment is also emotionally and mentally fatiguing, as well as emasculating.
4. School facilities in the poorest areas of the city are shiat. No air-conditioning for 90+ degree days at the beginning and end of the school year, and inadequate or unreliable heating during the middle of the school year. Not to mention crumbling infrastructure and crap resources - the students have seen what the schools look like in the better neighborhoods, and they interpret the quality of their schools is a reflection of how the city feels about their value as students and citizens.
5. Lack of community investment outside of predominantly white neighborhoods (look up "the white L and the black butterfly" if you want to know more about economic segregation in Baltimore city).
6. Terrible public transit. Well it's not all terrible - the light rail that goes out to the white suburbs, and the free buses that service the white corridors are all pretty functional. But if you're talking about a reliable way for somebody in West Baltimore to have reliable bus access to, say, Kevin Plank's new multimillion dollar UnderArmor facility (supposedly a "jobs engine)"...well, you're SOL.

The long and short of it is this: the city needs investment in jobs and infrastructure, fair housing, and criminal justice reform. Instead, the city leaders focus on policing, and tourism promotion that benefits a very narrow segment of the city's population.


I agree with much of your comment.

As someone who has mentioned marriage/two-parent households above, I would note that I don't think a two-parent home is a magical, instant cure for poverty.  However, it seems to have positive, long-term (generational) impacts on communities that practice it and positive, short-term impacts on the kids raised thusly.
 
2017-09-13 03:24:43 PM  
Since my kid just started pre-k in a baltimore city public school I'm getting a kick out of these replies.

The school seems decent.  Other parents very involved.  I've been impressed so far.  My son loves it and the teacher is great and sends her own kids to that school.  In this respect it passes the "restaurant employees eating their own food" test.

I live in a whitey gentrifying neighborhood though.  I'd never send my kid to 95% of the other schools or live in those neighborhoods.  Bad economic conditions make bad parents and bad parents make bad students and bad students make bad schools regardless of money.  Those neighborhoods are farked from the ground up.
 
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