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(Medical Xpress)   Large genomic databases hold clues linking genetic mutations to future disease risk, as well as new X-Men story lines   ( medicalxpress.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Genetics, future disease risk, Harvard Medical School, DNA, genetic mutations, Cancer, Genetic disorder, rare genetic disease  
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354 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Sep 2017 at 12:48 AM (12 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



9 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2017-09-13 02:13:35 AM  
And how soon before corporations patent certain gene sequences and make people pay for the right to license them as a matter of living?
 
2017-09-13 02:35:17 AM  

harleyquinnical: And how soon before corporations patent certain gene sequences and make people pay for the right to license them as a matter of living?


You're about 10 years too late. Those days of patenting genome sequences just for the sequence are gone, at least in the USA. There has to be an explicit biomedical use claimed, and usually attached to an invention of that use . IANAL though.
 
2017-09-13 04:54:14 AM  

harleyquinnical: And how soon before corporations patent certain gene sequences and make people pay for the right to license them as a matter of living?


Prior art, for one.  Unless you develop said gene sequence, pretty sure you can't claim patent just because you discovered or documented it.
 
2017-09-13 04:55:47 AM  
I think the bigger question is "How soon until insurance companies want genetic samples prior to insuring you?"

/dnrtfa
 
2017-09-13 09:12:54 AM  
Spoiler:

There are no new X-Men story lines..

Just the same garbage rehashed and reworked over and over and over...
 
2017-09-13 09:49:13 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

approves
 
2017-09-13 12:46:25 PM  
Too late for Len Wein.
 
2017-09-13 03:29:03 PM  

harleyquinnical: And how soon before corporations patent certain gene sequences and make people pay for the right to license them as a matter of living?


About the same time someone patents the sun and demands payments from every organism that survives based off of solar energy.  Good news is that mosquitoes, not having jobs or access to bank accounts, won't survive because they couldn't pay royalties (they feed on blood from animals that either other animals (that eat plants) or eat plants directly.
 
2017-09-14 12:17:48 AM  

DO NOT WANT Poster Girl: harleyquinnical: And how soon before corporations patent certain gene sequences and make people pay for the right to license them as a matter of living?

You're about 10 years too late. Those days of patenting genome sequences just for the sequence are gone, at least in the USA. There has to be an explicit biomedical use claimed, and usually attached to an invention of that use . IANAL though.


I thought that if you consented to the testing, the company could take whatever it wanted and patent it.

Doesn't matter, in my case I had good reason to consent to the work-up. My son came back positive for classic galactosemia, and because there were just enough potentials that our families could be related, they took our blood too. Never got the call that my husband and I are somehow closely related though. For a couple of reasons, I concluded that they didn't look at more than what was needed to confirm paternity, how closely related my husband and I are, and what specific mutation we had. Everything else probably would have amounted to money paying for an unneeded service.

For that reason, having genetic info is nice (getting a call one week after giving birth is a WAY different panic scenario than knowing it ahead of time and behind able to plan around it). On the other hand, there's always that potential for abuse.
 
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