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(CNBC)   Millennials face life after college, experience 'quarter-life crisis.' Corvette sales expected to rise   ( cnbc.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Mental health professional, recent graduates, American Psychiatric Association, Psychiatry, mental health, Academic degree, number recent graduates, social media  
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1094 clicks; posted to Business » on 11 Sep 2017 at 7:20 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-09-11 04:29:10 PM  
The youngest Millennials are 23 or so, i.e. if you became a young adult or came of age with George W. Bush's administration, you're a Millennial.
 
2017-09-11 05:38:49 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


What a Corvette that a Millennial can afford may look like.
 
2017-09-11 06:02:43 PM  
To be fair, with all the debt and high healthcare costs... 21 IS midlife for many
 
2017-09-11 07:05:23 PM  
Eh, I sort of had this. Around the time I was 24, I had a parent die horribly of cancer, an existential crisis that resulted in me leaving a religious cult (losing my social circle in the process,) and a dramatic, drawn-out breakup all within a 12 month period. I know I'm not going to win any "who had it worse" contests, and some parts of it were very silly in hindsight, but it still wasn't a particularly good time.

The biggest thing to come out of all that, though, was realizing simultaneously that I was at a point where I could start over and do whatever the hell I wanted to do, but that I had no idea what that was. That seems like the realization a lot of the people in the article are experiencing. It's not necessarily a bad thing.

/ I was, however, able to get my masters and pay off my student loans before I turned 30, so it still wasn't a quintessential Millennial experience
 
2017-09-11 07:41:23 PM  
The six months after graduating (the second time) were the most terrifying of my life, not knowing if this second degree in Mechanical Engineering was going to begin to help me land a job. I was less scared sitting five miles from the Iraq border 16 years ago today.

/One finally arrived, and I had to travel from Maine to North Dakota to get it.
//123 resumes sent with literally only that offer on the table. I can't make this crap up.
 
2017-09-11 07:42:37 PM  
Tough shiat? Work towards electing some non-shiatbag politicians or you'll be in the same place at 50.
 
2017-09-11 07:43:33 PM  

ajgeek: The six months after graduating (the second time) were the most terrifying of my life, not knowing if this second degree in Mechanical Engineering was going to begin to help me land a job. I was less scared sitting five miles from the Iraq border 16 years ago today.

/One finally arrived, and I had to travel from Maine to North Dakota to get it.
//123 resumes sent with literally only that offer on the table. I can't make this crap up.


It took me 4 months and about 55 resume submissions to land my first gig out of college. Stayed there for 5 years, moved around, got promoted.

I left just a few months ago. With the experience I had, I applied to 4 jobs in 1 night. Had two phone calls the next day. Got one of the jobs. From start to finish my second job took only 9 days from applying to putting in my two weeks.
 
2017-09-11 07:44:53 PM  

ajgeek: The six months after graduating (the second time) were the most terrifying of my life, not knowing if this second degree in Mechanical Engineering was going to begin to help me land a job. I was less scared sitting five miles from the Iraq border 16 years ago today.

/One finally arrived, and I had to travel from Maine to North Dakota to get it.
//123 resumes sent with literally only that offer on the table. I can't make this crap up.


Why didn't you just hit the bricks? Pull up your bootstraps? Get a small loan of a million dollars? Buy some more money?

I feel your pain.
 
2017-09-11 07:45:46 PM  

Martian_Astronomer: Eh, I sort of had this. Around the time I was 24, I had a parent die horribly of cancer, an existential crisis that resulted in me leaving a religious cult (losing my social circle in the process,) and a dramatic, drawn-out breakup all within a 12 month period. I know I'm not going to win any "who had it worse" contests, and some parts of it were very silly in hindsight, but it still wasn't a particularly good time.

The biggest thing to come out of all that, though, was realizing simultaneously that I was at a point where I could start over and do whatever the hell I wanted to do, but that I had no idea what that was. That seems like the realization a lot of the people in the article are experiencing. It's not necessarily a bad thing.

/ I was, however, able to get my masters and pay off my student loans before I turned 30, so it still wasn't a quintessential Millennial experience


Cult of Trump?
 
2017-09-11 07:47:37 PM  

majestic: Tough shiat? Work towards electing some non-shiatbag politicians or you'll be in the same place at 50.


Relying on politicians to make your life better is not a good plan for your life.
 
2017-09-11 07:52:32 PM  

AsparagusFTW: majestic: Tough shiat? Work towards electing some non-shiatbag politicians or you'll be in the same place at 50.

Relying on politicians to make your life better is not a good plan for your life.


Of course not. But electing assholes is a good way to make your life (and everybody else's) worse.
 
2017-09-11 08:01:52 PM  
Natividad, who recently graduated from the University of California, Irvine, with a degree in heath policy..."I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures,"

When I hired on, my team leader's mantra was (and still is):  be in the top 5% of whatever you do.  If you're in the top 5%, and certainly if you're in the top 2%, you're going to be imminently employable.
 
2017-09-11 08:33:31 PM  

Martian_Astronomer: The biggest thing to come out of all that, though, was realizing simultaneously that I was at a point where I could start over and do whatever the hell I wanted to do, but that I had no idea what that was. That seems like the realization a lot of the people in the article are experiencing. It's not necessarily a bad thing.


Yeah, the key at that time of life is to keep pushing.  It is a weird transitional time of life, that's for sure.  The important thing is to not retreat into your shell or give up.  Get out there and do some kind of work even if it isn't your life's dream.  At least you'll be doing something (and if you keep your eyes and ears open, learning something) while you plan your next move or figure out what you really want.  Almost no one lands on the right job/location/career/whatever on the first try.
 
2017-09-11 08:34:08 PM  

arcas: Natividad, who recently graduated from the University of California, Irvine, with a degree in heath policy..."I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures,"

When I hired on, my team leader's mantra was (and still is):  be in the top 5% of whatever you do.  If you're in the top 5%, and certainly if you're in the top 2%, you're going to be imminently employable.


And if you're not in the top 5%?

Floyd Meriweather may be the world's greatest boxer, but even 5 clones of him are going down in a fight against 95 other people when the time comes that the 95 get too hungry and decide to just take food by force.
 
2017-09-11 09:00:06 PM  
Time to reboot St Elmo's Fire
 
2017-09-11 09:40:43 PM  
I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures," Natividad told CNBC in a recent interview.

Gee, how original for Millennials. No other generation before or after could ever possibly imagine your unique pain.
 
2017-09-11 10:03:30 PM  

Fear the Clam: I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures," Natividad told CNBC in a recent interview.

Gee, how original for Millennials. No other generation before or after could ever possibly imagine your unique pain.


60 years ago, college graduates were rare and jobs plentiful.
 
2017-09-11 10:06:25 PM  

doglover: arcas: Natividad, who recently graduated from the University of California, Irvine, with a degree in heath policy..."I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures,"

When I hired on, my team leader's mantra was (and still is):  be in the top 5% of whatever you do.  If you're in the top 5%, and certainly if you're in the top 2%, you're going to be imminently employable.

And if you're not in the top 5%?

Floyd Meriweather may be the world's greatest boxer, but even 5 clones of him are going down in a fight against 95 other people when the time comes that the 95 get too hungry and decide to just take food by force.


If food is short, I'm pretty sure Floyd Meriweather's bodyguards would eat those 95 other people.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-09-11 11:00:18 PM  

Fear the Clam: I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures," Natividad told CNBC in a recent interview.

Gee, how original for Millennials. No other generation before or after could ever possibly imagine your unique pain.


The definition of irony is bashing millenials for a lack of originality.
 
2017-09-11 11:03:20 PM  
I remember having a quarter life crisis. It's silly, yeah, but also a real thing.

Became a bit of a man-slut, for better or worse. Eventually grew out of it (for better or worse).

/couldn't afford a Corvette
//could barely afford condoms
///became buried in credit card debt due to condom purchases
 
2017-09-11 11:30:09 PM  

Krieghund: doglover: arcas: Natividad, who recently graduated from the University of California, Irvine, with a degree in heath policy..."I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures,"

When I hired on, my team leader's mantra was (and still is):  be in the top 5% of whatever you do.  If you're in the top 5%, and certainly if you're in the top 2%, you're going to be imminently employable.

And if you're not in the top 5%?

Floyd Meriweather may be the world's greatest boxer, but even 5 clones of him are going down in a fight against 95 other people when the time comes that the 95 get too hungry and decide to just take food by force.

If food is short, I'm pretty sure Floyd Meriweather's bodyguards would eat those 95 other people.

[img.fark.net image 500x489]


Holy shiat. Is floyd photoshopped!?
 
2017-09-11 11:55:30 PM  
I saw some douchebag kid, maybe 20 years old, driving around a brand new zo6. The nicest car I've ever owned is a Toyota Camry.
 
2017-09-12 12:33:14 AM  

neapoi: I saw some douchebag kid, maybe 20 years old, driving around a brand new zo6. The nicest car I've ever owned is a Toyota Camry.


Mine was a Toyota Camry until I got a Grand Cherokee (that was 21 years old) last year.  Traded the Jeep for a pound of weed and the motor blew up on the guy a week later.  Haven't had to buy weed all summer.
 
2017-09-12 12:49:03 AM  

arcas: Natividad, who recently graduated from the University of California, Irvine, with a degree in heath policy..."I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures,"

When I hired on, my team leader's mantra was (and still is):  be in the top 5% of whatever you do.  If you're in the top 5%, and certainly if you're in the top 2%, you're going to be imminently employable.


That sounds like something Peggy Hill would say. Do y'all also have inspirational posters plastered everywhere?
 
2017-09-12 01:33:53 AM  
I remember my quarter life crisis.

When I graduated with my BSEE, I had no idea what I wanted to do with it. Less than a month later my girlfriend dumped me. In the next couple months I had a headhunter knock on my door. The first interview ended with basically 'I'm not really interested in this place and you really aren't interested in me'

The second interview was on a Thursday. The company was going to send me around the world trouble shooting part printing presses.  Apparently the headhunter left early Friday. A second interview was set up for Monday. I heard about the second Interview an hour before it was supposed to happen while at my current job. I was in the middle of basicly clean pig shiat off of electronic controls. I wouldn't have been able to make it home, shower, change and get there on time. I told off the headhunter and ended our relationship there.

I partied that summer a bunch contemplating joining the military. Ny best friend was ROTC, and just started his lcarrier there. He as a little encouraging about it.

My boss' friend had this 3 phase engineering consulting business.l out of his basement.  He was looking for a second employee. It was a stepping stone I thought.

19 years later he is set to retire. I am #2 out of 7. (4 are millenials) Company paid for me to be a PE. I rules lawyer The NEC. Apparently D&D and WEG Star Wars helped with something. We plan on hiring one or two graduates next year and voting the bullet by finally getting an office manager.

Since then, I have been part of the Sprint center, Dallas cowboys stadium, Rufus 2.0, Harvard's low voltage portion of their campus, Comcast tech in Philadelphia, Katrina rebuilds, and 100's more projects. I guess I lucked out.
 
2017-09-12 02:02:14 AM  
I didn't know Corvette started making futons that would fit in a basement.
 
2017-09-12 03:43:28 AM  
Seems pretty reasonable to me.  Two decades of formal schooling with a pretty well defined progression, then get spit out into the world with a pile of debt and expectations and not a whole lot of direction or conviction that what you've got is what you really want.  I'm going to guess that it's not particularly unique to millennials, either.
 
2017-09-12 03:49:36 AM  
Millennials act like they invented hardship. I graduated college in 1986. I got to experience
1. The Gas Crisis
2. Stagflation
3. Volker 20% plus home mortgage rate
4. The twin recessions of the early 80's
5. Early death of father when I was 17 y/o (this was not unusual due to smoking related heart attack deaths often in single income households)

I took out student loans to pay for college. We were really poor. I got a social science degree, and ended up in retail. I lived in Southern California in an era of rapidly rising home prices, and felt locked out of ever buying a home. I lived on credit cards, and had to go back to school for a master's degree.

Does any of this sound familiar?
 
2017-09-12 06:17:32 AM  
I didn't start college until I was in my mid twenties, but the crisis was doing that and raising two kids at the same time. Does that count?

If we are talkinb about angst and self doubt, though, that's always been there.
 
2017-09-12 07:41:38 AM  
It's times like this i look back at 25 and I'm like... Thanks Mom n dad for meeting in 1973.
 
2017-09-12 08:39:14 AM  

Harry_Seldon: Millennials act like they invented hardship. I graduated college in 1986. I got to experience
1. The Gas Crisis
2. Stagflation
3. Volker 20% plus home mortgage rate
4. The twin recessions of the early 80's
5. Early death of father when I was 17 y/o (this was not unusual due to smoking related heart attack deaths often in single income households)

I took out student loans to pay for college. We were really poor. I got a social science degree, and ended up in retail. I lived in Southern California in an era of rapidly rising home prices, and felt locked out of ever buying a home. I lived on credit cards, and had to go back to school for a master's degree.

Does any of this sound familiar?


Sounds like you have a firm foundation for empathizing with the younger, indebted masses.
 
2017-09-12 08:45:29 AM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Fear the Clam: I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures," Natividad told CNBC in a recent interview.

Gee, how original for Millennials. No other generation before or after could ever possibly imagine your unique pain.

60 years ago, college graduates were rare and jobs plentiful.


60 years ago people weren't so terrified and offended when someone suggested they weren't unique little snowflakes.
 
2017-09-12 09:17:24 AM  

ds615: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Fear the Clam: I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures," Natividad told CNBC in a recent interview.

Gee, how original for Millennials. No other generation before or after could ever possibly imagine your unique pain.

60 years ago, college graduates were rare and jobs plentiful.

60 years ago people weren't so terrified and offended when someone suggested they weren't unique little snowflakes.


60 years ago, the US had the lock on manufacturing since most of Europe and Japan were still rebuilding from the war, and China and most of southeast Asia were still an agrarian societies.
 
2017-09-12 09:23:33 AM  
I graduated University in 2007, wrote my last final on Saturday morning, packed my car up that afternoon and reported to work monday in another province. I worked my ass off for a year, and then got laid off in the 2008 downturn. I took a job teaching drafting, worked in a call center, and painted houses for a couple of years.  I got another engineering job in 2010 and I've been there since.  The two years really put a damper on my finances and I'm still renting while trying to pay down some debt.

Who the fark has the time or money for a quarter life crisis?
 
2017-09-12 09:54:19 AM  

84Charlie: ds615: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Fear the Clam: I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures," Natividad told CNBC in a recent interview.

Gee, how original for Millennials. No other generation before or after could ever possibly imagine your unique pain.

60 years ago, college graduates were rare and jobs plentiful.

60 years ago people weren't so terrified and offended when someone suggested they weren't unique little snowflakes.

60 years ago, the US had the lock on manufacturing since most of Europe and Japan were still rebuilding from the war, and China and most of southeast Asia were still an agrarian societies.


WW2 was the single biggest government stimulus program in the history of the world.  The US government gave its corporations huge sums of money.  Not only that, the money was for weapons that were literally used to destroy foreign competition (i.e. bombers built by Ford were blowing up VW and Toyota factories).  Not only THAT, but war rationing meant that all the workers hired to fill those roles (and all the troops earning military paychecks) didn't have anything to spend their money on----consumer goods were essentially unavailable.  Then you get the massive cash infusion that was the GI bill.

As a result, when the troops came home, they found they suddenly had pockets full of cash, and everyone had old clothes/old car/old radio/old whatever.  Everyone had the means to buy stuff, and who can blame them for going on a buying spree after the lean years of the depression and the leaner war years?  And lo and behold, the only products they CAN buy are made in the USA, because Germany was still struggling to find firewood, and was decades away from really getting back to being an economic powerhouse.

Anyone who thinks government can't help the economy doesn't understand history.  The cash infusion that was WW2 essentially created 20-30 years of unprecedented economic growth that touched every part of society---everyone who wanted to prosper could, but it was all thanks to massive government intervention.
 
2017-09-12 10:18:54 AM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Fear the Clam: I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures," Natividad told CNBC in a recent interview.

Gee, how original for Millennials. No other generation before or after could ever possibly imagine your unique pain.

60 years ago, college graduates were rare and jobs plentiful.


Nice cherry picking. 80 years ago there were few college degrees and very few jobs.

That doesn't even address any recession in between. Also what about the no college students? They just finished 12 years of school and have even less opportunity.
 
2017-09-12 10:23:41 AM  

ds615: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Fear the Clam: I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures," Natividad told CNBC in a recent interview.

Gee, how original for Millennials. No other generation before or after could ever possibly imagine your unique pain.

60 years ago, college graduates were rare and jobs plentiful.

60 years ago people weren't so terrified and offended when someone suggested they weren't unique little snowflakes.


Who encouraged that behavior trait, I wonder?

I can't tell you how true it is of other generations, but mine was taught farkall about life skills, either by parents or by teachers -- wait, I can.  My grandmother by well before age twenty or so could bake, cook, sew, knit, can and preserve food, mend clothing, manage money, basic household stuff and a thousand little housekeeping tricks to save time or money or whatever -- all things someone helped her to learn as she grew up.  Between her and my handyman grandfather, they could have gone off the grid, completely self-sustainable, on almost a moment's notice if they had to.

But for some reason between that time and when I came of age, people decided these weren't things their kids needed to know.  So fast forward fifty years or so, and when I graduated high school I could tell you all about the angles of a triangle or quadratic equations or obscure history trivia.  I really wish somebody would have taught me solid investment strategies, cooking, and simple household repairs instead.

I was sheltered as hell for twenty years and then thrown to the lions post-2008 crash.  In the midst of the shiatty soul-crushing job I had to keep to make ends meet, I wondered if this was the best life would ever get.  Then there was the mental health breakdown.  All of it caused some pretty deep depression for awhile.

So, yeah.  G'head and call me a clueless snowflake, but I didn't teach myself to be that way.  I did teach myself out of it, mostly, and learned most of the skills I needed and managed to find a decent job, but it was all shiat I already should have known because what the hell else are kids supposed to learn, but whatever, I can solve for x.

It took the rest of my twenties, and I'm still playing catch up; probably won't ever get there, but hey.  At least now I can buy myself a participation trophy.  :p
 
2017-09-12 10:26:07 AM  
Up yours, Subby. I just bought all of the Corvettes in Gran Turismo 6.
 
2017-09-12 10:35:34 AM  

doglover: Krieghund: doglover: arcas: Natividad, who recently graduated from the University of California, Irvine, with a degree in heath policy..."I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures,"

When I hired on, my team leader's mantra was (and still is):  be in the top 5% of whatever you do.  If you're in the top 5%, and certainly if you're in the top 2%, you're going to be imminently employable.

And if you're not in the top 5%?

Floyd Meriweather may be the world's greatest boxer, but even 5 clones of him are going down in a fight against 95 other people when the time comes that the 95 get too hungry and decide to just take food by force.

If food is short, I'm pretty sure Floyd Meriweather's bodyguards would eat those 95 other people.

[img.fark.net image 500x489]

Holy shiat. Is floyd photoshopped!?



I had to go look up how tall he is after seeing that photo because it makes him look like a midget, but he's 5'8.  Those guys all must be like 6'5 or bigger.
 
2017-09-12 12:09:00 PM  
wasn't this a generation x thing?
 
2017-09-12 12:28:40 PM  

TrainingWheelsNeeded: wasn't this a generation x thing?


Matthew Good-Generation X wing
Youtube dp64pffDuwc


I read your post wrong.
 
2017-09-12 01:02:05 PM  
FTA: "College is explicitly about scholarships, academia, left-brain learning, and in large [part] it has nothing to do with life preparation, mental health, physical health, nutrition, or basic life skills," said Byock. In her opinion, she added, "the notion that people wouldn't struggle after college is kind of silly."

Sure, if you go for the underwater basketweaving major.  Want a job?  Get an accounting degree.  You'll get a job.  Stop with this nonsense that college is supposed to be this unbridled exploration of academia and get people to focus on majors that give them marketable skills.

As far as struggling in that no-man's land between 25 and 30, everyone I know foundered a bit at that age.  I expect that's been going on for quite a while.  Why do people feel the need to think Millennials are the first and only people to experience everything?
 
2017-09-12 01:03:54 PM  
The article is spot-on about just how destructive Facebook is to peoples' psyches.  Want to be happier?  Delete your Facebook account.
 
2017-09-12 01:10:20 PM  

Priapetic: FTA: "College is explicitly about scholarships, academia, left-brain learning, and in large [part] it has nothing to do with life preparation, mental health, physical health, nutrition, or basic life skills," said Byock. In her opinion, she added, "the notion that people wouldn't struggle after college is kind of silly."

Sure, if you go for the underwater basketweaving major.  Want a job?  Get an accounting degree.  You'll get a job.  Stop with this nonsense that college is supposed to be this unbridled exploration of academia and get people to focus on majors that give them marketable skills.


This is a complete non sequitur and has nothing to do with the text you are responding to.
 
2017-09-12 02:33:06 PM  

TrainingWheelsNeeded: wasn't this a generation x thing?


Nah. We just spend life adrift. Knowing we may never achieve greater than our parents, but doing pretty well because we're less motivated by conspicuous consumption than the generation before or after us.

My 16 year old Camry started throwing a catalytic converter code a couple months ago. I'll probably get that checked out eventually.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-09-12 02:36:01 PM  

Egoy3k: Priapetic: FTA: "College is explicitly about scholarships, academia, left-brain learning, and in large [part] it has nothing to do with life preparation, mental health, physical health, nutrition, or basic life skills," said Byock. In her opinion, she added, "the notion that people wouldn't struggle after college is kind of silly."

Sure, if you go for the underwater basketweaving major.  Want a job?  Get an accounting degree.  You'll get a job.  Stop with this nonsense that college is supposed to be this unbridled exploration of academia and get people to focus on majors that give them marketable skills.

This is a complete non sequitur and has nothing to do with the text you are responding to.


Pretty sure suggesting a major that will yield marketable skills has EVERYTHING to do with life preparation.
 
2017-09-13 01:37:10 AM  

PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: Who encouraged that behavior trait, I wonder?

I can't tell you how true it is of other generations, but mine was taught farkall about life skills, either by parents or by teachers


No one had time to actually parent my generation. We were latch-key kids with two working parents (or a single working parent for many of us because divorce was really en vogue in the 90s), thanks to decades of wage stagnation and the influx of an entire gender into the workforce (thus doubling the number of workers and suppressing wages) that hadn't been there when our parents were kids. Not to mention skyrocketing tuition and every family suddenly needing to send its kids to college.

In an ideal world, millions of women joining the workforce would've freed millions of men to spend time raising the kids, but this didn't happen and now that our generation is raising the next one we're still trying to reach a happy equilibrium. The 2008 crash ironically probably helped us out by evicting millions of men from the workforce, many of whom have become stay-at-home dads.

But of course, now helicopter parenting is en vogue, people have kids without ever getting married, and the internet has introduced a whole new parent-child arms race as helicopter parents have become drone parents spying on their kids remotely via webcam (my single-mom coworker does this) and kids are exposed to toxic social media from the time they're old enough to read.

We millennials got shafted, but man our kids have got it rough. They won't even be functional when they reach adulthood.
 
2017-09-13 06:32:45 AM  

doglover: Krieghund: doglover: arcas: Natividad, who recently graduated from the University of California, Irvine, with a degree in heath policy..."I was ashamed that I didn't have a full-time job right after college, and that shame made me hesitant to spend time with underclassmen or with peers who I thought had brighter futures,"

When I hired on, my team leader's mantra was (and still is):  be in the top 5% of whatever you do.  If you're in the top 5%, and certainly if you're in the top 2%, you're going to be imminently employable.

And if you're not in the top 5%?

Floyd Meriweather may be the world's greatest boxer, but even 5 clones of him are going down in a fight against 95 other people when the time comes that the 95 get too hungry and decide to just take food by force.

If food is short, I'm pretty sure Floyd Meriweather's bodyguards would eat those 95 other people.

[img.fark.net image 500x489]

Holy shiat. Is floyd photoshopped!?


He's 5'8" and fights at ~150 pounds.  He's a good boxer but he's a little dude.
 
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