Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The New York Times)   Here's where Amazon should put their giant new headquarters   ( nytimes.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, metro areas, City, housing costs, Amazon, tech job pool, San Francisco, high housing costs, Big tech companies  
•       •       •

2682 clicks; posted to Business » on 11 Sep 2017 at 1:20 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



100 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2017-09-11 12:17:54 PM  
South Beach.
 
2017-09-11 12:59:58 PM  
Headline sounds like the set-up for a New Jersey joke.
 
2017-09-11 01:23:08 PM  
The city's lifestyle and affordability

Local house hunters would REALLY like a word with you. 10% year over year for almost a decade is not "affordable".

I see Amazon pushing to the East Coast, not half-stepping it across the country.
 
2017-09-11 01:26:18 PM  
Anyone within 20 miles of the new place will have to move or foreclose on thier home in 10 years
 
2017-09-11 01:32:40 PM  
I would love to see Amazon come to Rochester.  Two universities in town (UofR and RIT, with Syracuse just an hour away) making for a high-skilled labor pool, very low-cost of living, and two massive industrial complexes (Kodak and Xerox) that have a lot of empty real estate ripe for the plucking.
 
2017-09-11 01:34:16 PM  
They left out some of Amazon's requirements. Had they left them in, there would not be a single place remaining.
 
2017-09-11 01:35:16 PM  
So that place says it's easy to get around and out of... Washington DC?!  Jesus have they ever been there before?
 
2017-09-11 01:36:19 PM  
I like it. Any town that is smart enough to decline the Olympics is smart enough for Amazon.
 
2017-09-11 01:37:45 PM  

the_innkeeper: The city's lifestyle and affordability

Local house hunters would REALLY like a word with you. 10% year over year for almost a decade is not "affordable".

I see Amazon pushing to the East Coast, not half-stepping it across the country.


Yeah, I'm calling bullshiat on that part of the equation. Housing out there is insane. Once again, go somewhere where people are hungry for work, lots of room for growth and LOW real estate prices.

Personally I say Cleveland, mainly because I want to take a crack at some of the positions available.
 
2017-09-11 01:43:49 PM  

rummonkey: the_innkeeper: The city's lifestyle and affordability

Local house hunters would REALLY like a word with you. 10% year over year for almost a decade is not "affordable".

I see Amazon pushing to the East Coast, not half-stepping it across the country.

Yeah, I'm calling bullshiat on that part of the equation. Housing out there is insane. Once again, go somewhere where people are hungry for work, lots of room for growth and LOW real estate prices.

Personally I say Cleveland, mainly because I want to take a crack at some of the positions available.


There's a reason most of our astronauts come from Ohio...
 
2017-09-11 01:44:14 PM  
 
2017-09-11 01:44:51 PM  

rummonkey: Personally I say Cleveland, mainly because I want to take a crack at some of the positions available.

Yup, will probably be a rust belt revival to get cheap real estate and will involve a lot of tax incentives to get them there. Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Detroit, etc.

 
2017-09-11 01:45:46 PM  

the_innkeeper: The city's lifestyle and affordability

Local house hunters would REALLY like a word with you. 10% year over year for almost a decade is not "affordable".

I see Amazon pushing to the East Coast, not half-stepping it across the country.


Housing costs in Denver and the Metro area *HAVE* skyrocketed, but you can still go outside of town and get affordable housing (Evergreen, CO) or just go into Commerce City.

The lightrail system is really nice, although the 'W' line has too many stops IMHO.  They could build it up in the Tech Center, Downtown, or make a sprawling campus of their own design on the west side of town (Lots of open space down by C-470 and Kipling or the unfinished development in Rooney Valley).

Of course, it's a fat chance they would choose Denver.  They probably will keep on the best coast close to the main HQ and have two offices withing a days drive of each other.
 
2017-09-11 01:48:36 PM  
Denver is nice, but I'm calling it for North Carolina.
 
2017-09-11 01:50:28 PM  

tdyak: the_innkeeper: The city's lifestyle and affordability

Local house hunters would REALLY like a word with you. 10% year over year for almost a decade is not "affordable".

I see Amazon pushing to the East Coast, not half-stepping it across the country.

Housing costs in Denver and the Metro area *HAVE* skyrocketed, but you can still go outside of town and get affordable housing (Evergreen, CO) or just go into Commerce City.

The lightrail system is really nice, although the 'W' line has too many stops IMHO.  They could build it up in the Tech Center, Downtown, or make a sprawling campus of their own design on the west side of town (Lots of open space down by C-470 and Kipling or the unfinished development in Rooney Valley).

Of course, it's a fat chance they would choose Denver.  They probably will keep on the best coast close to the main HQ and have two offices withing a days drive of each other.


Who wants to drive from Evergreen everyday to the DTC? C470 has enough traffic as it is. 

Stick it in Louisville or somewhere else up Boulder/Superior-way. Plenty of land, and plenty of room for new housing.
 
2017-09-11 01:51:59 PM  
I think the piece prioritizes the wrong things. Yes, it's important to have a growing labor pool, but their first cut shouldn't have been "growing job market" it should have been "growing job market in the right fields" (i.e. a combination of criteria 1 & 2. They immediately cut out a bunch of midwest towns that are doing well in terms of tech but losing jobs in traditional arenas that Amazon cares less about.

On top of that, despite what Amazon says in their prospectus, the truth is that they want to run their business and they want to do it cheaply. The cost of living and availability/affordability of housing is a huge boon for some of these midwest towns. Talking about entry level software developers: that's a $60,000-$70,000/yr job in my midwest town, and it's a $110,000-$120,000/yr job in Silicon Valley. The disparity only gets worse after 5-10 years of employment, because pretty soon you get married and want a house with kids but the market only has $1,000,000+ homes or houses with a 1hr commute.

In a Midwest city Amazon could come into town offering $5,000-$10,000 above other entry level positions and immediately snap up the best local talent and have first-pick of the local scene. After a few years their talent can then buy houses for sub $100,000 (1br) to $300,000 (3-4br with a big yard).

Not to mention a lot of these Midwest cities have huge amounts of land relatively close to downtown that can fit a huge corporate campus, where in the denser parts of the country you're talking dozens of miles.
 
2017-09-11 01:54:06 PM  
Somewhere near Louisville.  We already have the largest UPS port, cheap housing compared to the national averages (though that is changing), over a million people and thus a bunch of goods and services, are within 250 miles of many of the larger cities mentioned, and have one of the larger Amazon warehouses around.

Of course, the amazing heat island effect in which we're arguably the city getting hottest the quickest in the whole damned nation, our completely idiotic state governor, and the general disdain for Louisville and Lexington from the rest of the state isn't incredibly helpful.  Also, it's hard to get people to move to Kentucky who haven't at least visited here.  ("What?  You all wear shoes?")
 
2017-09-11 01:54:09 PM  

facepalm.jpg: I think the piece prioritizes the wrong things. Yes, it's important to have a growing labor pool, but their first cut shouldn't have been "growing job market" it should have been "growing job market in the right fields" (i.e. a combination of criteria 1 & 2. They immediately cut out a bunch of midwest towns that are doing well in terms of tech but losing jobs in traditional arenas that Amazon cares less about.

On top of that, despite what Amazon says in their prospectus, the truth is that they want to run their business and they want to do it cheaply. The cost of living and availability/affordability of housing is a huge boon for some of these midwest towns. Talking about entry level software developers: that's a $60,000-$70,000/yr job in my midwest town, and it's a $110,000-$120,000/yr job in Silicon Valley. The disparity only gets worse after 5-10 years of employment, because pretty soon you get married and want a house with kids but the market only has $1,000,000+ homes or houses with a 1hr commute.

In a Midwest city Amazon could come into town offering $5,000-$10,000 above other entry level positions and immediately snap up the best local talent and have first-pick of the local scene. After a few years their talent can then buy houses for sub $100,000 (1br) to $300,000 (3-4br with a big yard).

Not to mention a lot of these Midwest cities have huge amounts of land relatively close to downtown that can fit a huge corporate campus, where in the denser parts of the country you're talking dozens of miles.


That still puts Denver at the top.
 
2017-09-11 01:55:37 PM  

facepalm.jpg: I think the piece prioritizes the wrong things. Yes, it's important to have a growing labor pool, but their first cut shouldn't have been "growing job market" it should have been "growing job market in the right fields" (i.e. a combination of criteria 1 & 2. They immediately cut out a bunch of midwest towns that are doing well in terms of tech but losing jobs in traditional arenas that Amazon cares less about.

On top of that, despite what Amazon says in their prospectus, the truth is that they want to run their business and they want to do it cheaply. The cost of living and availability/affordability of housing is a huge boon for some of these midwest towns. Talking about entry level software developers: that's a $60,000-$70,000/yr job in my midwest town, and it's a $110,000-$120,000/yr job in Silicon Valley. The disparity only gets worse after 5-10 years of employment, because pretty soon you get married and want a house with kids but the market only has $1,000,000+ homes or houses with a 1hr commute.

In a Midwest city Amazon could come into town offering $5,000-$10,000 above other entry level positions and immediately snap up the best local talent and have first-pick of the local scene. After a few years their talent can then buy houses for sub $100,000 (1br) to $300,000 (3-4br with a big yard).

Not to mention a lot of these Midwest cities have huge amounts of land relatively close to downtown that can fit a huge corporate campus, where in the denser parts of the country you're talking dozens of miles.


So Detroit it is then!
 
2017-09-11 01:58:11 PM  
I expect they'll build a new city from scratch in NE Delaware.
 
2017-09-11 02:02:07 PM  
Amazon is a company that is worth $billions.  So naturally the second HQ will be located in the city that can pony up the most in taxpayer dollars and taxbreaks.  I think the word is extortion although, in this case, there is no threat.  That will come years from now when they threaten to move.  They may want to locate in a place where they can attract a good workforce but not have to worry about competing for that workforce.
 
2017-09-11 02:07:46 PM  

kkinnison: Anyone within 20 miles of the new place will have to move or foreclose on thier home in 10 years


I would think owning a home near the new headquarters would be great for property values. If the growth makes the area unpleasant at least you can cash in and move. Would suck for renters though since rents will skyrocket.
 
2017-09-11 02:10:34 PM  

the_innkeeper: tdyak: the_innkeeper: The city's lifestyle and affordability

Local house hunters would REALLY like a word with you. 10% year over year for almost a decade is not "affordable".

I see Amazon pushing to the East Coast, not half-stepping it across the country.

Housing costs in Denver and the Metro area *HAVE* skyrocketed, but you can still go outside of town and get affordable housing (Evergreen, CO) or just go into Commerce City.

The lightrail system is really nice, although the 'W' line has too many stops IMHO.  They could build it up in the Tech Center, Downtown, or make a sprawling campus of their own design on the west side of town (Lots of open space down by C-470 and Kipling or the unfinished development in Rooney Valley).

Of course, it's a fat chance they would choose Denver.  They probably will keep on the best coast close to the main HQ and have two offices withing a days drive of each other.

Who wants to drive from Evergreen everyday to the DTC? C470 has enough traffic as it is. 

Stick it in Louisville or somewhere else up Boulder/Superior-way. Plenty of land, and plenty of room for new housing.


It would suck, but there's 285 - I25, C470, and you can always dive onto a side road like county line or Arapahoe, depending on where your going.  Plus, the commute is still better than what you have in California or Texas.

You could stick it halfway between Denver and Boulder off 93, except the only open space would be Rocky Flats, or too close to Rocky Flats.
 
2017-09-11 02:13:29 PM  
Amazon is open to any city in North America, NYT left out all of Canada.
 
2017-09-11 02:16:08 PM  

TNel: So that place says it's easy to get around and out of... Washington DC?!  Jesus have they ever been there before?


i'm guessing now

I've driven in DC traffic once, and it made me miss Dallas traffic and I'm from Houston
 
2017-09-11 02:16:33 PM  
Detroit or Pittsburgh, they could ude the boost
 
2017-09-11 02:17:42 PM  

loonatic112358: TNel: So that place says it's easy to get around and out of... Washington DC?!  Jesus have they ever been there before?

i'm guessing not

I've driven in DC traffic once, and it made me miss Dallas traffic and I'm from Houston


ftfm
 
2017-09-11 02:25:45 PM  

loonatic112358: TNel: So that place says it's easy to get around and out of... Washington DC?!  Jesus have they ever been there before?

i'm guessing now

I've driven in DC traffic once, and it made me miss Dallas traffic and I'm from Houston


The metric they're probably using there is public transit, and the Metro while an cost overrunning mess is at least somewhat decent, and expanding into one of the two areas mentioned in the article (Loudon).  Then you have the multiple train systems filtering through union station.
 
2017-09-11 02:26:29 PM  

tdyak: Blah blah blah I have no idea what the purpose of the W line is


Evergreen is too far out and commerce city doesnt help anything at all given how spread out everything is.  If anything there are not enough branches and stops from the light rail systems, especially with how shirty the bus routes are when it comes to reliability.

/it takes less than an hour to get from union to golden on the W
//whole point if this is so people who cant afford a car can still get around
///I'd bet you work for the city as an urban planner you out of touch schmuck.
 
2017-09-11 02:33:38 PM  

Wireless Joe: Amazon is open to any city in North America, NYT left out all of Canada.


Waterloo (or the KW area) has thrown their hat into the ring.
In their favour:
- upcoming tech centre close to U of W
- socialized healthcare
- just outside the swirl-zone of 'merikuh (if it is indeed sh*tting the bed)
 
2017-09-11 02:38:08 PM  

hammer85: loonatic112358: TNel: So that place says it's easy to get around and out of... Washington DC?!  Jesus have they ever been there before?

i'm guessing now

I've driven in DC traffic once, and it made me miss Dallas traffic and I'm from Houston

The metric they're probably using there is public transit, and the Metro while an cost overrunning mess is at least somewhat decent, and expanding into one of the two areas mentioned in the article (Loudon).  Then you have the multiple train systems filtering through union station.


See my link upthread?  There's going to be a Metro station there, one stop away from Dulles Airport, in about 18 months.
 
2017-09-11 02:38:20 PM  
Yeah, about eliminating all of those cities for lack of job growth or labor pool- that is BS from Amazon and even an elected seat filler in Baltimore/Cleveland/Tucsan knows it (there I go again, giving elected seat fillers too much credit). Legions will relocate where ever Amazon wants them to, and that will drive job growth in all other sectors in the immediate surrounding community as they compete for workers. Heck, lack of recent job growth is likely a positive for a city in Amazon's court. I'm still firmly in the camp that they want to be close to DC for lobbying purposes, but not in DC simply because of lack of space. So, Baltimore (highly likely) and Philadephia are good candidates. Beyond that, I'm sure Cleveland would drain the lake for them to move there.
Gotta big Boston the props for saying fark off, we've reached our limit on smug imitation tech companies and we aren't playing to get another.
 
2017-09-11 02:41:10 PM  

Registered just to post this: tdyak: Blah blah blah I have no idea what the purpose of the W line is


I worked downtown for a few years and took the W line to avoid traffic / parking.

A coworker could drive from Evergreen into downtown, park and arrive at the building in the same amount of time it would take for me to ride the W line from Wadsworth to union station, then take the shuttle down to my building.  That was early in the morning (6am-ish), so before rush hour traffic would get crazy.

Before they removed the lot for apartment buildings, I would drive over to the Alameda station and ride the lightrail in from there.  Free parking and a faster ride to downtown.  Then they rebuilt the lot, then turned around and tore it out for an apartment complex.
 
2017-09-11 02:45:15 PM  

Stone Meadow: Denver is nice, but I'm calling it for North Carolina.


i'm thinking either DFW or Denver. One thing is timezones, no one in North Carolina would want to wake up in time for a conference call in Seattle. Plus, it's a 5 hour flight which means travel consumes a whole work day just about. You can fly Denver to Seattle in about 3 hours and the timezone difference is only an hour. DFW has more to offer but it's a 4 hour flight + 3 hours time zone difference.
 
2017-09-11 02:48:49 PM  

the_innkeeper: rummonkey: the_innkeeper: The city's lifestyle and affordability

Local house hunters would REALLY like a word with you. 10% year over year for almost a decade is not "affordable".

I see Amazon pushing to the East Coast, not half-stepping it across the country.

Yeah, I'm calling bullshiat on that part of the equation. Housing out there is insane. Once again, go somewhere where people are hungry for work, lots of room for growth and LOW real estate prices.

Personally I say Cleveland, mainly because I want to take a crack at some of the positions available.

There's a reason most of our astronauts come from Ohio...


'cause they want to leave so badly ??
 
2017-09-11 02:51:06 PM  

tdyak: Registered just to post this: tdyak: Blah blah blah I have no idea what the purpose of the W line is

I worked downtown for a few years and took the W line to avoid traffic / parking.

A coworker could drive from Evergreen into downtown, park and arrive at the building in the same amount of time it would take for me to ride the W line from Wadsworth to union station, then take the shuttle down to my building.  That was early in the morning (6am-ish), so before rush hour traffic would get crazy.

Before they removed the lot for apartment buildings, I would drive over to the Alameda station and ride the lightrail in from there.  Free parking and a faster ride to downtown.  Then they rebuilt the lot, then turned around and tore it out for an apartment complex.


I call bullshiat on your coworker too, the 6 to 25 exchange at any time of day before 11pm is crazy unless this was more than 5 years ago.  If it was more than 5 yrs I stand by my assumption that you're an out of touch schmuck.  Auraria West to Oak takes like 25 mins tops.

You should probably look up the designs when the old streetcar system was in place, the whole Idea was to build hubs around each station so you could walk to whatever you needed to do and keep housing from skyrocketing across the whole area.

/then it was ripped out so more people would buy cars
//which poor people cant afford, especially in that area where even shiatters go for 4-5 grand and will break down in a year
 
2017-09-11 03:03:10 PM  

Wireless Joe: Amazon is open to any city in North America, NYT left out all of Canada.


Are Canadian cities allowed to pay 💰Billions to companies to relocate?
 
2017-09-11 03:08:54 PM  

Registered just to post this: tdyak: Registered just to post this: tdyak: Blah blah blah I have no idea what the purpose of the W line is

I worked downtown for a few years and took the W line to avoid traffic / parking.

A coworker could drive from Evergreen into downtown, park and arrive at the building in the same amount of time it would take for me to ride the W line from Wadsworth to union station, then take the shuttle down to my building.  That was early in the morning (6am-ish), so before rush hour traffic would get crazy.

Before they removed the lot for apartment buildings, I would drive over to the Alameda station and ride the lightrail in from there.  Free parking and a faster ride to downtown.  Then they rebuilt the lot, then turned around and tore it out for an apartment complex.

I call bullshiat on your coworker too, the 6 to 25 exchange at any time of day before 11pm is crazy unless this was more than 5 years ago.  If it was more than 5 yrs I stand by my assumption that you're an out of touch schmuck.  Auraria West to Oak takes like 25 mins tops.

You should probably look up the designs when the old streetcar system was in place, the whole Idea was to build hubs around each station so you could walk to whatever you needed to do and keep housing from skyrocketing across the whole area.

/then it was ripped out so more people would buy cars
//which poor people cant afford, especially in that area where even shiatters go for 4-5 grand and will break down in a year


Keep in the left lane on 6th to avoid the I-25 nightmare when going downtown and you're fine.  I was doing that commute for a job last November through February from Lakewood (at 9am, so during rush hour), so I have been through that recently.  You would occasionally get someone who wanted to dive onto I-25 that hosed up the left lane, but for the most part, the left lane would fly past I-25 going into downtown.  The sucky part is parking / paying for parking.

I was going to 17th and Welton. Auraria West is a heck of a walk to there.  I would go into Union station, then take the mall shuttle.  Plus you have to arrive with time to wait for the lightrail, then wait for the mall shuttle to move, etc.

You miss a lot of traffic if you're driving into downtown before / around 6am.
 
2017-09-11 03:11:58 PM  

chasd00: Stone Meadow: Denver is nice, but I'm calling it for North Carolina.

i'm thinking either DFW or Denver. One thing is timezones, no one in North Carolina would want to wake up in time for a conference call in Seattle. Plus, it's a 5 hour flight which means travel consumes a whole work day just about. You can fly Denver to Seattle in about 3 hours and the timezone difference is only an hour. DFW has more to offer but it's a 4 hour flight + 3 hours time zone difference.


Time zones...how do they work?
 
2017-09-11 03:17:38 PM  

the_innkeeper: The city's lifestyle and affordability

Local house hunters would REALLY like a word with you. 10% year over year for almost a decade is not "affordable".

I see Amazon pushing to the East Coast, not half-stepping it across the country.


Denver is very affordable to people who've sold homes in Silicon Valley and Boston.  They're the ones who are bidding 20-25% above asking prices and making housing unaffordable for the natives.

I'm throwing fits at Hancock and every media contact I have.  Amazon would be the death of Denver.
 
2017-09-11 03:23:37 PM  
I know they probably have a mailbox here in town, but Amazon moving to Delaware for our tax friendly business laws and proximity to Philly international is being played up heavily. Also the fact that HSBC and Dupont are pink slipping people at an alarming rate and the state needs a new big employer
 
2017-09-11 03:26:32 PM  

eagles95: I know they probably have a mailbox here in town, but Amazon moving to Delaware for our tax friendly business laws and proximity to Philly international is being played up heavily. Also the fact that HSBC and Dupont are pink slipping people at an alarming rate and the state needs a new big employer


Amazon was re-incorporated in Delaware in 1996.
 
2017-09-11 03:27:41 PM  

chasd00: Stone Meadow: Denver is nice, but I'm calling it for North Carolina.

i'm thinking either DFW or Denver. One thing is timezones, no one in North Carolina would want to wake up in time for a conference call in Seattle. Plus, it's a 5 hour flight which means travel consumes a whole work day just about. You can fly Denver to Seattle in about 3 hours and the timezone difference is only an hour. DFW has more to offer but it's a 4 hour flight + 3 hours time zone difference.


NC would be 3 hrs "ahead" of Seattle,  so 8 AM there would be 11 AM in NC, so waking up early wouldn't be an issue.  Staying late might but not a major problem.
Travel W isn't bad because of the same time change,  so leave NC at 8, get to SeaTac at 10. It's the flight back that stinks.
 
2017-09-11 03:30:41 PM  
This is what my home's value has been doing for a while now. I'm 6 miles away from their current headquarters.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-09-11 03:32:31 PM  

Stone Meadow: Denver is nice, but I'm calling it for North Carolina.


North Carolina is not a business friendly environment.  For instance they like to park people outside of bathrooms to inspect papers and your genitalia.  In addition - I doubt Amazon will park anything close to Washington area.  The talent pool there is nothing to write home about.

/Denver is the logical choice
 
2017-09-11 03:35:46 PM  
I'm gonna say Dallas. Or Dallas-adjacent. Or maybe Austin.
 
2017-09-11 03:40:27 PM  

gingerjet: Stone Meadow: Denver is nice, but I'm calling it for North Carolina.

North Carolina is not a business friendly environment.  For instance they like to park people outside of bathrooms to inspect papers and your genitalia.  In addition - I doubt Amazon will park anything close to Washington area.  The talent pool there is nothing to write home about.

/Denver is the logical choice


Washington, DC?  You're saying Amazon won't park anything close to Washington, DC?
 
2017-09-11 03:41:02 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: I'm gonna say Dallas. Or Dallas-adjacent. Or maybe Austin.


Toyota just relocated to Plano. Of course, they prefer places where people have to drive cars.
 
2017-09-11 03:45:17 PM  

Cardinal Ximenez: chasd00: Stone Meadow: Denver is nice, but I'm calling it for North Carolina.

i'm thinking either DFW or Denver. One thing is timezones, no one in North Carolina would want to wake up in time for a conference call in Seattle. Plus, it's a 5 hour flight which means travel consumes a whole work day just about. You can fly Denver to Seattle in about 3 hours and the timezone difference is only an hour. DFW has more to offer but it's a 4 hour flight + 3 hours time zone difference.

NC would be 3 hrs "ahead" of Seattle,  so 8 AM there would be 11 AM in NC, so waking up early wouldn't be an issue.  Staying late might but not a major problem.
Travel W isn't bad because of the same time change,  so leave NC at 8, get to SeaTac at 10. It's the flight back that stinks.


my bad, I had it backwards but the effect is the same. I'll grant weather is probably more stable in NC than Denver for sure. I doubt you have to worry much about flight delays due to weather.
 
2017-09-11 03:48:42 PM  

mcreadyblue: Smelly Pirate Hooker: I'm gonna say Dallas. Or Dallas-adjacent. Or maybe Austin.

Toyota just relocated to Plano. Of course, they prefer places where people have to drive cars.


Austin is too small, they're struggling infrastructurewise as it is. For a facility as large as Amz is talking it's just too small a town.
 
Displayed 50 of 100 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report