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(CBC)   Think you're covered against fraudulent charges on your credit card? Maybe not, if the thief knows your PIN number. That is, your personal identification number. Number   ( cbc.ca) divider line
    More: Stupid, credit card, Walmart Canada Bank, Rick Jolicoeur, PIN, credit card company, cardholder agreement, CBC News, Debit card  
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4121 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Aug 2017 at 3:16 AM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-08-22 11:43:34 PM  
You'd have to use the PIN number at an ATM machine, probably
 
2017-08-22 11:55:06 PM  
One Is The Loneliest Number - Three Dog Night (Lyrics)
Youtube d5ab8BOu4LE
 
2017-08-22 11:56:07 PM  

SoupGuru: You'd have to use the PIN number at an ATM machine, probably


It's just common sense, it keeps others from using your ass to mouth machine.
 
2017-08-22 11:57:29 PM  
 
2017-08-22 11:59:49 PM  

Boo_Guy: SoupGuru: You'd have to use the PIN number at an ATM machine, probably

It's just common sense, it keeps others from using your ass to mouth machine.


Sign #29 that you watch too much porn
 
2017-08-23 12:03:09 AM  

SoupGuru: Boo_Guy: SoupGuru: You'd have to use the PIN number at an ATM machine, probably

It's just common sense, it keeps others from using your ass to mouth machine.

Sign #29 that you watch too much porn


Or, maybe not enough!
 
2017-08-23 12:07:55 AM  

Boo_Guy: SoupGuru: Boo_Guy: SoupGuru: You'd have to use the PIN number at an ATM machine, probably

It's just common sense, it keeps others from using your ass to mouth machine.

Sign #29 that you watch too much porn

Or, maybe not enough!


I may be in danger of not watching enough porn. I took the last hour off. What do I do?!
 
2017-08-23 12:15:19 AM  

SoupGuru: Boo_Guy: SoupGuru: You'd have to use the PIN number at an ATM machine, probably

It's just common sense, it keeps others from using your ass to mouth machine.

Sign #29 that you watch too much porn


Heard that phrase on TV for the first time the other night.

KillJoys Ass to Mouth
Youtube 99ln99OyZXw
 
2017-08-23 12:15:30 AM  
I'm not sure I'd want to get a credit card from a company known for its absolutely atrocious customer service.
 
2017-08-23 12:52:20 AM  
A thief got my card and knew my PIN. That thief then took money from a couple of different ATMs. I reported the theft and was reimbursed, the thief was caught, everything ended up just swell.
 
2017-08-23 01:03:27 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: I'm not sure I'd want to get a credit card from a company known for its absolutely atrocious customer service.


You give your phone money.
 
2017-08-23 01:04:06 AM  

timujin: A thief got my card and knew my PIN. That thief then took money from a couple of different ATMs. I reported the theft and was reimbursed, the thief was caught, everything ended up just swell.


But enough about your second ex-wife!
 
2017-08-23 01:06:39 AM  
I hope someone steals my identity so I can ruin their credit.
 
2017-08-23 01:06:58 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: timujin: A thief got my card and knew my PIN. That thief then took money from a couple of different ATMs. I reported the theft and was reimbursed, the thief was caught, everything ended up just swell.

But enough about your second ex-wife!


Funny, but I've been lucky enough to not meet my second ex-wife just yet. The first one was enough.
 
2017-08-23 01:10:37 AM  

timujin: Marcus Aurelius: timujin: A thief got my card and knew my PIN. That thief then took money from a couple of different ATMs. I reported the theft and was reimbursed, the thief was caught, everything ended up just swell.

But enough about your second ex-wife!

Funny, but I've been lucky enough to not meet my second ex-wife just yet. The first one was enough.


I've still got my first one up in the attic.

/not kidding
 
2017-08-23 01:32:40 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: TuteTibiImperes: I'm not sure I'd want to get a credit card from a company known for its absolutely atrocious customer service.

You give your phone money.


I don't give it money, but I do use ApplePay, which uses a token system that is more secure than even the chip-based credit cards.
 
2017-08-23 01:47:12 AM  
I don't even know my PIN and I've never asked for it because the last thing I need is to pay $25% APR for a cash advance.
 
2017-08-23 01:49:24 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: Marcus Aurelius: TuteTibiImperes: I'm not sure I'd want to get a credit card from a company known for its absolutely atrocious customer service.

You give your phone money.

I don't give it money, but I do use ApplePay, which uses a token system that is more secure than even the chip-based credit cards.


{pithy comment here}
{feeds TTs pets tuna fish}
 
2017-08-23 01:51:41 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: I don't even know my PIN


Try telling that to Verizon.
 
2017-08-23 03:22:04 AM  

SoupGuru: Boo_Guy: SoupGuru: You'd have to use the PIN number at an ATM machine, probably

It's just common sense, it keeps others from using your ass to mouth machine.

Sign #29 that you watch too much porn


BBC nods in agreement.
 
2017-08-23 03:26:54 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: I don't even know my PIN and I've never asked for it because the last thing I need is to pay $25% APR for a cash advance.


$25%? Does thst mean you only have $100?
 
2017-08-23 03:42:27 AM  
Well done, subs.
 
2017-08-23 05:34:36 AM  
Winnipeg couple slams Walmart Canada Bank

Stopped reading right there, pretty sure I've identified the root of your problem.  Don't use shiatty banks, problem solved.
 
2017-08-23 05:52:28 AM  
This is why you should only use PIN protected websites like Fark.

**** **** **** **** **/** ***
****
 
2017-08-23 05:55:39 AM  
Living in the USA, I have not used a PIN with a card before as the USA seems to be sticking with the chip and signature route. However, in countries where chip and PIN is used, it seems trivially easy to discover the PIN.

If the PIN limited to only 4 digits, that can be cracked probably in a couple minutes, using programming skills to rapidly generate and submit purchases for small transactions to hundreds of small online merchant websites, working through all 1000 possible combinations until you find one that accepts a transaction.
 
2017-08-23 06:04:22 AM  
The Walmart Ombudsman? He'll surely help these folks get their money back!
 
2017-08-23 06:16:53 AM  

SoupGuru: You'd have to use the PIN number at an ATM machine, probably


I think I see what you did?  Could you RSVP please?  I need to know if you would like some Au Jus sauce.

Redundant?
 
2017-08-23 06:23:05 AM  
Somehow following a guest for days to learn his pin seems like am extraordinary amount of work for a thief.

It's almost like, hmm, I dunno, the husband had a little dalliance with some high class local escorts, they blackmailed him into paying at their "rental agency", and he cooks up this story to cover it.

More likely to me than techno-crypto mexican thieves who spend days staking out a gringo for 4000k cad.
 
2017-08-23 06:24:19 AM  

Fooby: Living in the USA, I have not used a PIN with a card before as the USA seems to be sticking with the chip and signature route. However, in countries where chip and PIN is used, it seems trivially easy to discover the PIN.

If the PIN limited to only 4 digits, that can be cracked probably in a couple minutes, using programming skills to rapidly generate and submit purchases for small transactions to hundreds of small online merchant websites, working through all 1000 possible combinations until you find one that accepts a transaction.


Um... I live in the USA and while almost all places now require I insert my card into the chip reader instead of sliding it, the steps that follow are the same as they've always been. I'm presented with the option to pick credit or debit just as I was when I slid the card. If I choose "credit", I am then asked to sign, if I choose debit, I'm prompted for my PIN.

As for "cracking" someone's PIN, there are 10,000 possible combinations of 0-9 for a four digit number, not 1,000, and with most institutions, entering the PIN incorrectly more than a certain number of times (three to five in the case of my cards) locks the account and generates a fraud alert.
 
2017-08-23 06:27:35 AM  

timujin: Fooby: Living in the USA, I have not used a PIN with a card before as the USA seems to be sticking with the chip and signature route. However, in countries where chip and PIN is used, it seems trivially easy to discover the PIN.

If the PIN limited to only 4 digits, that can be cracked probably in a couple minutes, using programming skills to rapidly generate and submit purchases for small transactions to hundreds of small online merchant websites, working through all 1000 possible combinations until you find one that accepts a transaction.

Um... I live in the USA and while almost all places now require I insert my card into the chip reader instead of sliding it, the steps that follow are the same as they've always been. I'm presented with the option to pick credit or debit just as I was when I slid the card. If I choose "credit", I am then asked to sign, if I choose debit, I'm prompted for my PIN.

As for "cracking" someone's PIN, there are 10,000 possible combinations of 0-9 for a four digit number, not 1,000, and with most institutions, entering the PIN incorrectly more than a certain number of times (three to five in the case of my cards) locks the account and generates a fraud alert.


Did you know you can use 4-6 numbers for a pin, not just 4? Nobody seems to ever read that fine print but I've used a 6 number pin my entire life because you can.
 
2017-08-23 06:37:39 AM  

adj_m: This is why you should only use PIN protected websites like Fark.

**** **** **** **** **/** ***
****


5524 8672 0124 8899 01/22 565
7809

Hrm... I'm still seeing the numbers. Is it working for y'all?
 
2017-08-23 06:37:50 AM  

Col. Gathers: Somehow following a guest for days to learn his pin seems like am extraordinary amount of work for a thief.


Alright, I'll come clean, here's my "I'm a farking moron" story. I was visiting my hometown and had been out with my friends. They all decided to turn in, but I'm from the west coast and was two hours ahead, so I decided to make the most of my brief time back in town. I went to another bar and, while there, met a girl. We had a couple of drinks and were enjoying ourselves. I was still feeling restless, though, and suggested we try someplace else. We went to a different bar that had a cash only cover. I didn't have cash, so we walked to a nearby ATM. Drunk off my ass, I ran my card through and made a withdrawal. Then we went to the bar and enjoyed ourselves for another hour or so.

At the end of the night we found a quiet spot and fooled around a bit before saying goodnight. It wasn't until the next day that I realized she'd lifted my card at some point during all that. Since she'd been standing next to me at the ATM, she'd seen my PIN and was able to use it to withdraw cash.

As soon as I figured out what was up, I called the bank, put a stop on my card and told them what happened. They reimbursed me immediately and then investigated the issue. From what I understand, they used camera footage to identify the woman and reported her to the police. She had a record and was easily identified, the cops arrested her and now she is dealing with that and I'm not.

It's the only time I have allowed myself to be taken advantage of in that way. If there's any bright side it's that it was a valuable lesson and won't happen again.
 
2017-08-23 06:38:25 AM  

UsikFark: ecmoRandomNumbers: I don't even know my PIN and I've never asked for it because the last thing I need is to pay $25% APR for a cash advance.

$25%? Does thst mean you only have $100?


According to Google, $25% is "0.25 US$"

So he's got a quarter.
 
2017-08-23 06:47:27 AM  

AVDev: adj_m: This is why you should only use PIN protected websites like Fark.

**** **** **** **** **/** ***
****

5524 8672 0124 8899 01/22 565
7809

Hrm... I'm still seeing the numbers. Is it working for y'all?


Gah! There's no money here, I've only managed to steal your debt! well looks like I've got egg on my face now...  It's going to take me forever to pay this off.
 
2017-08-23 06:52:46 AM  

Col. Gathers: timujin: Fooby: Living in the USA, I have not used a PIN with a card before as the USA seems to be sticking with the chip and signature route. However, in countries where chip and PIN is used, it seems trivially easy to discover the PIN.

If the PIN limited to only 4 digits, that can be cracked probably in a couple minutes, using programming skills to rapidly generate and submit purchases for small transactions to hundreds of small online merchant websites, working through all 1000 possible combinations until you find one that accepts a transaction.

Um... I live in the USA and while almost all places now require I insert my card into the chip reader instead of sliding it, the steps that follow are the same as they've always been. I'm presented with the option to pick credit or debit just as I was when I slid the card. If I choose "credit", I am then asked to sign, if I choose debit, I'm prompted for my PIN.

As for "cracking" someone's PIN, there are 10,000 possible combinations of 0-9 for a four digit number, not 1,000, and with most institutions, entering the PIN incorrectly more than a certain number of times (three to five in the case of my cards) locks the account and generates a fraud alert.

Did you know you can use 4-6 numbers for a pin, not just 4? Nobody seems to ever read that fine print but I've used a 6 number pin my entire life because you can.


I don't know if that's true in all countries. I know my bank allows for a six digit PIN in Europe, but I can't find anything that says what the max length is here. I do know that I was asked to create a four-digit PIN when I last set up my card.

Even if it is possible to go beyond four digits, though, almost every PIN field I've seen on a card reader here in the U.S. only has space for four digits. What happens if you have a PIN longer than that? Does it simply allow you to input past what the field can contain? Does it only recognize the first four? Or does it simply error out since what you are able to input doesn't match what you've set up?

I'm not disputing your assertion, I'm just curious to know how that works. I do know there's an RFC for PIN numbers that says you should be able to use up to 12 digits, but I've never encountered that as an option.
 
2017-08-23 07:24:41 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-08-23 07:25:38 AM  

timujin: Col. Gathers: Somehow following a guest for days to learn his pin seems like am extraordinary amount of work for a thief.

Alright, I'll come clean, here's my "I'm a farking moron" story. I was visiting my hometown and had been out with my friends. They all decided to turn in, but I'm from the west coast and was two hours ahead, so I decided to make the most of my brief time back in town. I went to another bar and, while there, met a girl. We had a couple of drinks and were enjoying ourselves. I was still feeling restless, though, and suggested we try someplace else. We went to a different bar that had a cash only cover. I didn't have cash, so we walked to a nearby ATM. Drunk off my ass, I ran my card through and made a withdrawal. Then we went to the bar and enjoyed ourselves for another hour or so.

At the end of the night we found a quiet spot and fooled around a bit before saying goodnight. It wasn't until the next day that I realized she'd lifted my card at some point during all that. Since she'd been standing next to me at the ATM, she'd seen my PIN and was able to use it to withdraw cash.

As soon as I figured out what was up, I called the bank, put a stop on my card and told them what happened. They reimbursed me immediately and then investigated the issue. From what I understand, they used camera footage to identify the woman and reported her to the police. She had a record and was easily identified, the cops arrested her and now she is dealing with that and I'm not.

It's the only time I have allowed myself to be taken advantage of in that way. If there's any bright side it's that it was a valuable lesson and won't happen again.


She''s crafty,
She''s just my type.

RIP MCA
 
2017-08-23 07:27:45 AM  
This is one of the few areas where US consumer protection law is MUCH better than most of the rest of the world.

Your liability for credit card fraud in the US is limited to $50.  If you report debit card fraud within 2 days of becoming aware of the fraud, it's also limited to $50.  There's no sticking some bullshiat about the PIN in the contract, that's illegal.

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0213-lost-or-stolen-credit-atm-​a​nd-debit-cards

Most US credit cards cover all fraud, so the $50 doesn't even generally matter.
 
2017-08-23 07:30:14 AM  

timujin: Col. Gathers: timujin: Fooby: Living in the USA, I have not used a PIN with a card before as the USA seems to be sticking with the chip and signature route. However, in countries where chip and PIN is used, it seems trivially easy to discover the PIN.

If the PIN limited to only 4 digits, that can be cracked probably in a couple minutes, using programming skills to rapidly generate and submit purchases for small transactions to hundreds of small online merchant websites, working through all 1000 possible combinations until you find one that accepts a transaction.

Um... I live in the USA and while almost all places now require I insert my card into the chip reader instead of sliding it, the steps that follow are the same as they've always been. I'm presented with the option to pick credit or debit just as I was when I slid the card. If I choose "credit", I am then asked to sign, if I choose debit, I'm prompted for my PIN.

As for "cracking" someone's PIN, there are 10,000 possible combinations of 0-9 for a four digit number, not 1,000, and with most institutions, entering the PIN incorrectly more than a certain number of times (three to five in the case of my cards) locks the account and generates a fraud alert.

Did you know you can use 4-6 numbers for a pin, not just 4? Nobody seems to ever read that fine print but I've used a 6 number pin my entire life because you can.

I don't know if that's true in all countries. I know my bank allows for a six digit PIN in Europe, but I can't find anything that says what the max length is here. I do know that I was asked to create a four-digit PIN when I last set up my card.

Even if it is possible to go beyond four digits, though, almost every PIN field I've seen on a card reader here in the U.S. only has space for four digits. What happens if you have a PIN longer than that? Does it simply allow you to input past what the field can contain? Does it only recognize the first four? Or does it simply error out since what you are able to input doesn't match what you've set up?

I'm not disputing your assertion, I'm just curious to know how that works. I do know there's an RFC for PIN numbers that says you should be able to use up to 12 digits, but I've never encountered that as an option.


I think there was 1 atm, probably in DRC, that was pretty old and refused to take it. It only had spots for 4 numbers.

I've used both my credit and debit all throughout the USA and Canada and never had a problem with 6 numbers.

In Canada most machines say "enter your 4-6 digit pin" right on them.
 
2017-08-23 07:32:43 AM  
Although interestingly, when I use my visa online and it does the electronic verification step, it only takes the first 4 digits of the pin. I never set that up, just came with the card when I got it.
 
2017-08-23 07:45:46 AM  

Col. Gathers: timujin: Col. Gathers: timujin: Fooby: Living in the USA, I have not used a PIN with a card before as the USA seems to be sticking with the chip and signature route. However, in countries where chip and PIN is used, it seems trivially easy to discover the PIN.

If the PIN limited to only 4 digits, that can be cracked probably in a couple minutes, using programming skills to rapidly generate and submit purchases for small transactions to hundreds of small online merchant websites, working through all 1000 possible combinations until you find one that accepts a transaction.

Um... I live in the USA and while almost all places now require I insert my card into the chip reader instead of sliding it, the steps that follow are the same as they've always been. I'm presented with the option to pick credit or debit just as I was when I slid the card. If I choose "credit", I am then asked to sign, if I choose debit, I'm prompted for my PIN.

As for "cracking" someone's PIN, there are 10,000 possible combinations of 0-9 for a four digit number, not 1,000, and with most institutions, entering the PIN incorrectly more than a certain number of times (three to five in the case of my cards) locks the account and generates a fraud alert.

Did you know you can use 4-6 numbers for a pin, not just 4? Nobody seems to ever read that fine print but I've used a 6 number pin my entire life because you can.

I don't know if that's true in all countries. I know my bank allows for a six digit PIN in Europe, but I can't find anything that says what the max length is here. I do know that I was asked to create a four-digit PIN when I last set up my card.

Even if it is possible to go beyond four digits, though, almost every PIN field I've seen on a card reader here in the U.S. only has space for four digits. What happens if you have a PIN longer than that? Does it simply allow you to input past what the field can contain? Does it only recognize the first four? Or does it simply error out since wh ...


In my quick Google earlier where I was trying to find out the allowable length for a PIN at my bank, I saw a couple of forum threads where people said they were able to use the longer ones at ATMs, but had issues elsewhere. Have you used your card at other establishments in the U.S. like gas stations, or convenience or grocery stores? Places with card readers that have the "four digit fields" I was referring to. I'm asking because if a six-digit PIN is universally accepted (or nearly so), then it seems like an easy and worthwhile precaution to take.

Perhaps a simpler route would be to ask if any U.S. residents in the thread have a PIN that is longer than four digits.
 
2017-08-23 07:49:37 AM  

Col. Gathers: Although interestingly, when I use my visa online and it does the electronic verification step, it only takes the first 4 digits of the pin. I never set that up, just came with the card when I got it.


For a while there, a couple of sites I use would kick off the "Verified by Visa" process when running a transaction. I didn't have to enter my PIN, though, I had to use my web banking login and password (this was only on one or two sites that I trusted, not some random eMerchant). The last couple of times I've seen that initiate, though, it seems to have become an automated process. I don't know if it uses cookies or if it's because I've done it once and am now "verified", but I'm no longer prompted to enter any additional information.
 
2017-08-23 07:50:42 AM  

adj_m: This is why you should only use PIN protected websites like Fark.

**** **** **** **** **/** ***
****


On a side note did you notice that this wonderful site is not secure? When you're logging in your credentials are being sent unencrypted. Be afraid. Very afraid.
 
2017-08-23 07:55:32 AM  

timujin: Col. Gathers: timujin: Col. Gathers: timujin: Fooby: Living in the USA, I have not used a PIN with a card before as the USA seems to be sticking with the chip and signature route. However, in countries where chip and PIN is used, it seems trivially easy to discover the PIN.

If the PIN limited to only 4 digits, that can be cracked probably in a couple minutes, using programming skills to rapidly generate and submit purchases for small transactions to hundreds of small online merchant websites, working through all 1000 possible combinations until you find one that accepts a transaction.

Um... I live in the USA and while almost all places now require I insert my card into the chip reader instead of sliding it, the steps that follow are the same as they've always been. I'm presented with the option to pick credit or debit just as I was when I slid the card. If I choose "credit", I am then asked to sign, if I choose debit, I'm prompted for my PIN.

As for "cracking" someone's PIN, there are 10,000 possible combinations of 0-9 for a four digit number, not 1,000, and with most institutions, entering the PIN incorrectly more than a certain number of times (three to five in the case of my cards) locks the account and generates a fraud alert.

Did you know you can use 4-6 numbers for a pin, not just 4? Nobody seems to ever read that fine print but I've used a 6 number pin my entire life because you can.

I don't know if that's true in all countries. I know my bank allows for a six digit PIN in Europe, but I can't find anything that says what the max length is here. I do know that I was asked to create a four-digit PIN when I last set up my card.

Even if it is possible to go beyond four digits, though, almost every PIN field I've seen on a card reader here in the U.S. only has space for four digits. What happens if you have a PIN longer than that? Does it simply allow you to input past what the field can contain? Does it only recognize the first four? Or does it simply error out since wh ...

In my quick Google earlier where I was trying to find out the allowable length for a PIN at my bank, I saw a couple of forum threads where people said they were able to use the longer ones at ATMs, but had issues elsewhere. Have you used your card at other establishments in the U.S. like gas stations, or convenience or grocery stores? Places with card readers that have the "four digit fields" I was referring to. I'm asking because if a six-digit PIN is universally accepted (or nearly so), then it seems like an easy and worthwhile precaution to take.

Perhaps a simpler route would be to ask if any U.S. residents in the thread have a PIN that is longer than four digits.


I just remembered, St Marys idaho bank machine wouldn't use my card either. Had to go to the wells Fargo and get a cash advance on the credit card, no pin just by swiping and signing. That was back in 2015
 
2017-08-23 07:55:41 AM  

SoupGuru: Boo_Guy: SoupGuru: Boo_Guy: SoupGuru: You'd have to use the PIN number at an ATM machine, probably

It's just common sense, it keeps others from using your ass to mouth machine.

Sign #29 that you watch too much porn

Or, maybe not enough!

I may be in danger of not watching enough porn. I took the last hour off. What do I do?!


Jerk  twice as fast for the next hour, duh.
 
2017-08-23 07:55:51 AM  

DarkVader: This is one of the few areas where US consumer protection law is MUCH better than most of the rest of the world.

Your liability for credit card fraud in the US is limited to $50.  If you report debit card fraud within 2 days of becoming aware of the fraud, it's also limited to $50.  There's no sticking some bullshiat about the PIN in the contract, that's illegal.

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0213-lost-or-stolen-credit-atm-a​nd-debit-cards

Most US credit cards cover all fraud, so the $50 doesn't even generally matter.


Ding ding ding. This. 

Interestingly enough, about two years ago or so my bank called me because my debit card showed some odd transactions on it from Hong Kong and Singapore.  There was a requisite 1 cent transaction because they were testing the #. I think it was rubber dog shiat or something odd like that. We discussed it, they contacted the merchants and that was that. The bank said they would eat ALL the charges. Fortunately the merchants reversed the transactions so my bank got their money back.

Why yes, I did use a merchant to purchase some cables or some other electronic stuff. I stopped using them and went back to Amazon where it's safe, I guess.
 
2017-08-23 07:57:11 AM  

Fooby: Living in the USA, I have not used a PIN with a card before as the USA seems to be sticking with the chip and signature route. However, in countries where chip and PIN is used, it seems trivially easy to discover the PIN.


Whereas it's vanishingly difficult to forge a signature, particularly to the standards required by a greasy plastic touchscreen and a blunt stylus?

If the PIN limited to only 4 digits, that can be cracked probably in a couple minutes, using programming skills to rapidly generate and submit purchases for small transactions to hundreds of small online merchant websites, working through all 1000 possible combinations until you find one that accepts a transaction.

Just as online transactions for US card holders do not use a signature, online transactions for card holders outside the US do not use the card holder's ATM PIN.
 
2017-08-23 08:00:45 AM  
Col. Gathers:
I think there was 1 atm, probably in DRC, that was pretty old and refused to take it. It only had spots for 4 numbers

I hope you had a good reason to be there...

ipoproject.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2017-08-23 08:05:00 AM  
Semi related fun fact - Where chip and PIN has been adopted, the liability for transaction fraud has typically been passed from the bank to the retailer. Chip and PIN's slow adoption in the US is partly a result of Walmart's (understandable) reluctance to accept this change.
 
2017-08-23 08:25:50 AM  
What

the

Fark?

I live in Virginia and both my wife and myself have bank cards (credit union, actually) issued by Mastercard.

They have both the magnetic stripe and the embedded chip with contacts on the card face.

When the card reader at any location we shop asks for a PIN, if one is entered the money comes directly from our checking; if instead we simply press 'Enter' on the card reader the transaction goes through as a charge--NO PIN REQUIRED!!!

That said, anyone could steal our cards, simply NOT enter the PIN and still charge whatever they wished to our accounts.

It seems the couple in TFA that were on vacation are subject to exactly what we experience--enter no PIN and the transaction goes through as a charge.  No Farking way should they be responsible!!
 
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  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

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