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(liliputing)   They're developing a Linux-based alternative to Android -- unless Android changed kernels, it's already Linux based. I don't know if I should read further   ( liliputing.com) divider line
    More: Dumbass, Android phones, Smartphone, older Android phones, software updates, Android, official software updates, Samsung Galaxy Nexus, unofficial software updates  
•       •       •

1009 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Aug 2017 at 4:20 PM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



25 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-08-17 08:40:57 AM  
Great. Now we have fifteen competing standards.
 
2017-08-17 10:44:31 AM  
Lineage OS is a great Android distro for those with old phones

For those who do not know, Lineage is a fork of the now defunct Cyanogenmod project.
 
2017-08-17 12:24:40 PM  
Ubuntu tried this, didn't they?
 
2017-08-17 01:58:15 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: Great. Now we have fifteen competing standards.


Nope -- the only thing this OS does is boot and display an image
I don't understand why this piece of shiat article was greenlit, or why the article was even written to begin with
 
2017-08-17 03:04:20 PM  

rcain: Tr0mBoNe: Great. Now we have fifteen competing standards.

Nope -- the only thing this OS does is boot and display an image
I don't understand why this piece of shiat article was greenlit, or why the article was even written to begin with


Now now, TFA says that they've managed to get a network connection over USB on some phones
 
2017-08-17 03:46:46 PM  
Install iOS.

:P
 
2017-08-17 04:29:12 PM  
Movin' right along
Root-use and ANSI-free

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-08-17 04:43:46 PM  
Without drivers from the chip makers this will either be dead on arrival or slow as balls due to a thousand layers of abstraction and shiatty emulation.
 
2017-08-17 04:54:29 PM  

cman: Lineage OS is a great Android distro for those with old phones

For those who do not know, Lineage is a fork of the now defunct Cyanogenmod project.


Yeah, only Lineage OS has no official releases and never plans to have any.  It's constantly in beta and racing to catch up with Android flavor of the month.   I'd been waiting for a stable release to load onto my Nexus 7 (2013) tablet only to find that there are only nightlies... and there's no way to tell the difference between a working nightly and a "hey we changed something last night, let's hope for the best" nightly.

If it had a sane release cycle, I'd try it out.  Something like  Alpha, Beta, Stable, Long Term Stable would be great, but no.   Everything is a nightly in the world of eternal beta.
 
2017-08-17 05:12:29 PM  

Mr Tarantula: Without drivers from the chip makers this will either be dead on arrival or slow as balls due to a thousand layers of abstraction and shiatty emulation.


Plus, people mostly update devices because they want newer hardware (in the form of faster processors, better cameras, more ram/storage, etc).

Very few people are going to keep a phone for 10 years, no matter how many OS/kernel updates it gets, so something like this will always be a niche project.

Just think about what phones looked like 10 years ago

[GIS for 'Phones of 2007']

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-08-17 05:28:08 PM  

lordargent: Mr Tarantula: Without drivers from the chip makers this will either be dead on arrival or slow as balls due to a thousand layers of abstraction and shiatty emulation.

Plus, people mostly update devices because they want newer hardware (in the form of faster processors, better cameras, more ram/storage, etc).

Very few people are going to keep a phone for 10 years, no matter how many OS/kernel updates it gets, so something like this will always be a niche project.

Just think about what phones looked like 10 years ago

[GIS for 'Phones of 2007']

[img.fark.net image 850x318]


Keep in mind 2007 was before the iPhone. Unless there's a real game changer the phones of the future will look similar to today's. The tech is so mature now there's less reason to upgrade for these little nudges in clock speed. I plan on keeping my Nexus 6P until it breaks.

The only reason to upgrade from a flagship phone today is if you like new shiny toys (guilty) or you break it.
 
2017-08-17 06:25:42 PM  

Mr Tarantula: Keep in mind 2007 was before the iPhone. Unless there's a real game changer the phones of the future will look similar to today's


I wouldn't make that bet if I were you. 10 years is a very long time when it comes to tech and I would wager in another ~10 years we're going to have some sort of holo display + watch going on.

Just take a look at 1987, I bet folks thought that would be the form factor for another decade ... but then the iPhone came out in June 2007.

sites.google.comView Full Size


(and there are a lot of major design iterations in between, go back to 1984 and show a DynaTac user the color screen of the RAZR that came out in 2004 and watch their heads explode. ).

// Besides, my post wasn't about the 'looks' of the phone, it was about the hardware capabilities. Processors will get faster, and content will become more processor intensive as a result. 10 year old hardware won't be able to keep up.
 
2017-08-17 06:26:22 PM  
I'm developing a flour based alternative to the brioche, submitter.
 
2017-08-17 07:02:43 PM  

lordargent: Just take a look at 1987, I bet folks thought that would be the form factor for another decade ... but then the iPhone came out in June 2007.


And those people were pretty much right. You're off by a decade. From 1987 to somewhere between 1994-2000, the form factor changed from brick to slim. Then another decade later, it changed to the current style.

We're about due for a change, apparently.
 
2017-08-17 07:07:32 PM  
Subby:  Who is "They're" ?
 
2017-08-17 07:25:51 PM  

Mr Tarantula: lordargent: Mr Tarantula: Without drivers from the chip makers this will either be dead on arrival or slow as balls due to a thousand layers of abstraction and shiatty emulation.

Plus, people mostly update devices because they want newer hardware (in the form of faster processors, better cameras, more ram/storage, etc).

Very few people are going to keep a phone for 10 years, no matter how many OS/kernel updates it gets, so something like this will always be a niche project.

Just think about what phones looked like 10 years ago

[GIS for 'Phones of 2007']

[img.fark.net image 850x318]

Keep in mind 2007 was before the iPhone. Unless there's a real game changer the phones of the future will look similar to today's. The tech is so mature now there's less reason to upgrade for these little nudges in clock speed. I plan on keeping my Nexus 6P until it breaks.

The only reason to upgrade from a flagship phone today is if you like new shiny toys (guilty) or you break it.


Topping this on a Nexus 6P, and I completely agree. I'll never get another carrier-tethered device. Vanilla Android is nice.

/Yes, topping
 
2017-08-17 07:45:34 PM  

trialpha: And those people were pretty much right. You're off by a decade. From 1987 to somewhere between 1994-2000, the form factor changed from brick to slim. Then another decade later, it changed to the current style.


OOps, I did 20 years didn't I.

// Still, we're already 1 decade past the iPhone launch. So even if it's a 20 year upheval, we're already 10 years toward it.

// Either way, this is still just a tangent off my original point (that 10 year old hardware sucks even without a major hardware upheval).
 
2017-08-17 08:58:22 PM  

xanadian: Install iOS.

:P


That would be Unix.
Not it's bastard child.
 
2017-08-17 09:28:48 PM  

Mr Tarantula: The only reason to upgrade from a flagship phone today is if you like new shiny toys (guilty) or you break it.


I'd agree except for one thing, and that's battery life. A lot of phones nowadays have internal batteries that aren't easy to replace, so some people will upgrade for that reason too.
 
2017-08-18 03:02:33 AM  
Now that Android is as common as it is, Alphabet really should push some more standards on it, like being able to uninstall bloatware (half of the phone's internal storage? WTF?!) or install any application to the SD card, assuming it is a new enough card that it won't cause too much lag. Half the apps that I have are used once a month or less, so some lag is OK, but having bloat ware eating up so much space that it can't even update itself and I don't use it? I want to be able to fully uninstall it at that point.
 
2017-08-18 04:34:56 AM  

lordargent: Mr Tarantula: Without drivers from the chip makers this will either be dead on arrival or slow as balls due to a thousand layers of abstraction and shiatty emulation.

Plus, people mostly update devices because they want newer hardware (in the form of faster processors, better cameras, more ram/storage, etc).

Very few people are going to keep a phone for 10 years, no matter how many OS/kernel updates it gets, so something like this will always be a niche project.

Just think about what phones looked like 10 years ago

[GIS for 'Phones of 2007']

[img.fark.net image 850x318]


Depends on the age and job of the human.  I'm older and I've been in mobile devices QA for so long, I couldn't care less about the next best thing.  As a matter of fact, if I could have my old Helio Ocean back, I would take it in a heartbeat.
 
2017-08-18 06:16:09 AM  

gozar_the_destroyer: Now that Android is as common as it is, Alphabet really should push some more standards on it, like being able to uninstall bloatware (half of the phone's internal storage? WTF?!) or install any application to the SD card, assuming it is a new enough card that it won't cause too much lag. Half the apps that I have are used once a month or less, so some lag is OK, but having bloat ware eating up so much space that it can't even update itself and I don't use it? I want to be able to fully uninstall it at that point.


It's the manufacturers and carriers that put that shiat on there. Nothing Google can do about it unless they want to try to manufacture their own phones and have their own carrier service.

/With hookers and blackjack
 
2017-08-18 10:38:32 AM  

Brynden Rivers: gozar_the_destroyer: Now that Android is as common as it is, Alphabet really should push some more standards on it, like being able to uninstall bloatware (half of the phone's internal storage? WTF?!) or install any application to the SD card, assuming it is a new enough card that it won't cause too much lag. Half the apps that I have are used once a month or less, so some lag is OK, but having bloat ware eating up so much space that it can't even update itself and I don't use it? I want to be able to fully uninstall it at that point.

It's the manufacturers and carriers that put that shiat on there. Nothing Google can do about it unless they want to try to manufacture their own phones and have their own carrier service.

/With hookers and blackjack


There two options to fully prevent it.

#1 remove the system folder entirely. Treat all apps the same regardless of where they came from. This has a lot of end benefits.

#2 allow uninstall, not just freezing of system apps. This one should also allow the updates against system, not a newer apk in app being used rendering the stale one in system wasted space.

They won't do either for security reasons. They think some apps should never be uninstalled else your phone might be rendered useless. And I don't know they could ever prevent a manufacturer from adding to the bloat so long as there's a way for Google to do it too.

I would love this to be solved, but I don't think Google actually cares to, such is too bad.
 
2017-08-18 10:47:16 AM  

Brynden Rivers: gozar_the_destroyer: Now that Android is as common as it is, Alphabet really should push some more standards on it, like being able to uninstall bloatware (half of the phone's internal storage? WTF?!) or install any application to the SD card, assuming it is a new enough card that it won't cause too much lag. Half the apps that I have are used once a month or less, so some lag is OK, but having bloat ware eating up so much space that it can't even update itself and I don't use it? I want to be able to fully uninstall it at that point.

It's the manufacturers and carriers that put that shiat on there. Nothing Google can do about it unless they want to try to manufacture their own phones and have their own carrier service.

/With hookers and blackjack


Which they did pretty much. Pixel was designed by Google, but manufactured by HTC. I believe they also rolled out their own mobile reselling service. I have a pixel and love it. Vanilla Android is nice and I get monthly security updates.
 
2017-08-18 03:11:55 PM  

Brynden Rivers: gozar_the_destroyer: Now that Android is as common as it is, Alphabet really should push some more standards on it, like being able to uninstall bloatware (half of the phone's internal storage? WTF?!) or install any application to the SD card, assuming it is a new enough card that it won't cause too much lag. Half the apps that I have are used once a month or less, so some lag is OK, but having bloat ware eating up so much space that it can't even update itself and I don't use it? I want to be able to fully uninstall it at that point.

It's the manufacturers and carriers that put that shiat on there. Nothing Google can do about it unless they want to try to manufacture their own phones and have their own carrier service.

/With hookers and blackjack


Apple got incredibly lucky in that at the time, AT&T was desperately trying to gain a foothold in the wireless market, and thus they were willing to agree to allow Apple to have total control of the software on the iPhone to get to sell it.

Apple's first choice to carry the iPhone was Verizon, but they wanted to put the Verizon logo on the phone itself, and load it with Verizon software.  You can fill in Steve Jobs' response to that.
 
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