Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Deadspin)   "Dixon Sucks Donkey Dicks" remains a cautionary tale preached by editors and journalism professors   ( deadspin.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Gawker Media, deadspin, Jalopnik, Gizmodo, Filthiest Fuck-Up, Default, Fallout  
•       •       •

8606 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Aug 2017 at 5:20 PM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



78 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2017-08-16 04:23:08 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-08-16 04:28:58 PM  
Surprisingly interesting read.
 
2017-08-16 04:44:06 PM  
Began my career decades ago doing preps also, and while I took a back seat to no one as a prankster going back to childhood, I never did anything like that. There are some lines too risky to cross.
 
2017-08-16 04:51:38 PM  
I would have loved to have gotten $800,000 for some teasing at school.  I got plenty of that for free.
 
2017-08-16 04:52:04 PM  
And a twist at the end.
 
2017-08-16 04:59:53 PM  
Now THAT'S what I call "Fake News"!
 
2017-08-16 05:04:02 PM  
Good read.
 
2017-08-16 05:16:38 PM  
I remember when this happened. I was working as associate copy chief in an office that published 11 magazines. We always cracked down on the editors or designers if they ever inserted dummy copy like "Caption will go here" or "Call back to get last name," or mocking up a layout with a stock photo while waiting for the actual photo, anything like that--far too much risk of it accidentally getting into print.

Every Monday Jay Leno did his "Headlines" segment and I always videotaped it and took it to that week's staff meeting as an icebreaker. About half his material was horrible copy mistakes that got into print. We always had fun watching it but as the next-to-last (often in practice, the very last) person who signed off on nearly 200 articles a month before they went to print I never, ever forgot that whenever Leno aired one of those things, there was one person in the country who wasn't laughing, and that was the editor who let the mistake get by.

When this happened it made a big splash in the industry and I remember hearing about it in a Poynter Institute newsletter. I took it to my boss and said we should discuss it at staff meeting so the rest of the editorial and design staff would understand why we were so anal and humorless about any sort of dummy copy.

They finally agreed to let me make a small handful of copies, mention the incident in the staff meeting without any specifics and offer to give anyone who wanted a copy after the meeting.

Naturally, everyone was curious. I ended up having to explain to an executive VP just why I thought such a filthy, destructive joke was funny.

I said I didn't and at the time I really didn't--it was like finding out someone who has your job accidentally sat on a nuclear missile launch button. I literally had nightmares about something like this happening to me when I was responsible for all the copy for 11 periodicals going to a total of more than 6 million subscribers.

Whew.
 
2017-08-16 05:23:44 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-08-16 05:27:11 PM  
I worked for three years as a writer and then an editor for my small-beans little college newspaper. We put out an April Fool's edition that was decreed so foul that the editors-in-chief (not me that year) had to apologize to the entire student body before they were allowed to graduate, but our real farkup was:

A local fast-food joint was held up by people who locked the employees in the walk-in freezer, then set fire to the building. I think there were deaths involved, and that the whole thing was an inside job.

What I do remember clearly is our junk, placeholder headline that accidentally made it to press:

"FREEZERBURN!"
 
2017-08-16 05:29:56 PM  

LowbrowDeluxe: Surprisingly interesting read.


Really?

I came in to say the opposite. It's a boring article about a boring article.

When it finally after many paragraphs gets to the interesting part--why write about this particular article?--it doesn't get any better.
 
2017-08-16 05:30:59 PM  
"Suzanne sucks pussy!"
 
2017-08-16 05:31:28 PM  
I have a degree in journalism and have worked as essentially an editor (among other things) for 20 years and have never heard this story. Then again, I don't work in print journalism, so maybe it's an industry thing that I, not working in the industry, am not privy to.

But I will say the lesson here is electronic page layout makes it really farking easy to change things and ALSO really easy to fark them up. Like what happened here.

That's why when you have placeholder copy, you make it that ipsum nonsense, not actual words, and certainly not insulting comments about anybody. Because sure as shiat, you'll put that in something (like a newspaper article or ad) intending to replace it with legit text later, it'll get printed. Or appear on a website.
 
2017-08-16 05:34:17 PM  
 
2017-08-16 05:35:20 PM  
Is ESPN going to do a 30-for-30 thing on this?
 
2017-08-16 05:36:12 PM  
TL;DR

So...does he?
 
2017-08-16 05:41:33 PM  

abhorrent1: TL;DR

So...does he?


He never explicitly denies it.
 
2017-08-16 05:43:39 PM  

mcmnky: LowbrowDeluxe: Surprisingly interesting read.

Really?

I came in to say the opposite. It's a boring article about a boring article.

When it finally after many paragraphs gets to the interesting part--why write about this particular article?--it doesn't get any better.


I doubt I'll ever warm up to the Internet fad of longform essays where the first thing you see is a gigantic graphic and oblique headline and you have no idea what the hell it's about, then you scroll down to read five or six paragraphs and you still have no idea what the hell it's about. (It's especially prevalent in sports writing.) I read a lot but my time is finite, so I have to be at least somewhat selective.

Still, I skimmed this one and think I got the highlights. Enough that I don't feel obligated to post the Mallrats "did he cum or what" meme.
 
2017-08-16 05:46:25 PM  

gonegirl: I worked for three years as a writer and then an editor for my small-beans little college newspaper. We put out an April Fool's edition that was decreed so foul that the editors-in-chief (not me that year) had to apologize to the entire student body before they were allowed to graduate, but our real farkup was:

A local fast-food joint was held up by people who locked the employees in the walk-in freezer, then set fire to the building. I think there were deaths involved, and that the whole thing was an inside job.

What I do remember clearly is our junk, placeholder headline that accidentally made it to press:

"FREEZERBURN!"


Sweet eructating Cthulhu on a PVC pogo stick. That's exactly the reason most good copyeditors hate dummy copy so much.

When I was the editor for my college newspaper, our April Fool's edition ran obituaries for everyone on the newspaper staff. They were all absolutely insane; one of them started off with "Suzy Jones found out there IS a wrong way to eat a Reese's Peanut Butter Cup when she tried to swallow one whole and choked to death," for instance. But of course, a handful of students and staff Were. NOT. Amused.
 
2017-08-16 05:46:58 PM  
We used to deliberately change random names in AP wire stories we were asked to edit down to 28 inches of copy at 1am as filler in the innards of the Stanford Daily.  It made for good comedy at breakfast the next morning when your roommate was in the news...  "White House deputy press secretary Doug Ackerman reported today that yadda yadda yadda..."  Nobody reads that stuff anyhow, right?
 
2017-08-16 05:48:38 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: I have a degree in journalism and have worked as essentially an editor (among other things) for 20 years and have never heard this story. Then again, I don't work in print journalism, so maybe it's an industry thing that I, not working in the industry, am not privy to.

But I will say the lesson here is electronic page layout makes it really farking easy to change things and ALSO really easy to fark them up. Like what happened here.

That's why when you have placeholder copy, you make it that ipsum nonsense, not actual words, and certainly not insulting comments about anybody. Because sure as shiat, you'll put that in something (like a newspaper article or ad) intending to replace it with legit text later, it'll get printed. Or appear on a website.


THIS. Our rule was that any placeholder copy had to be lorem ipsum and if they were waiting on a photo or other graphic they had to print a gray box where the graphic was going to go. Absolutely no exceptions.
 
2017-08-16 05:48:45 PM  
Tl;dr some manchild snuck dirty words into a sports story and the editor didn't catch it. How does this rate a 50000 word expose?
 
2017-08-16 05:51:23 PM  
I don't know why but I had the feeling it was going to end like it did.  Definitely a cautionary tale for the ages though.
 
2017-08-16 05:54:44 PM  
CSB: "Porcupines." That almost got into Microsoft product documentation.

I had a habit, as a young tech writer, of leaving place markers when writing long chunks of new content - if I hadn't completed a sentence, I'd end it with "porcupines" and pick it up later, as it was easy to find in tech docs.

One slipped through while I was working on docs. Got through writing, editing, and tech review, complete with signoff - we were doing our final production pass, the very last thing we do before docs go out the door, when my editor ran in with wide eyes and said, "...porcupines!" It got through because the sentence made sense - it was grammatically correct, and as it had been through a prior editing pass (the content had been updated, not added), I didn't do my usual checks on it. She didn't catch it because, again, it was an update on existing, previously approved material. It wasn't an expletive, or a colloquial usage, or anything else that our usual localization & guideline tools would catch.

There's nothing quite as embarrassing as having to be the guy who had to go to a product triage meeting and explain that I had introduced a show-stopper bug into the product. There's a dollar sign attached to that shiat.
 
2017-08-16 05:56:48 PM  

Sensei Can You See: Smelly Pirate Hooker: I have a degree in journalism and have worked as essentially an editor (among other things) for 20 years and have never heard this story. Then again, I don't work in print journalism, so maybe it's an industry thing that I, not working in the industry, am not privy to.

But I will say the lesson here is electronic page layout makes it really farking easy to change things and ALSO really easy to fark them up. Like what happened here.

That's why when you have placeholder copy, you make it that ipsum nonsense, not actual words, and certainly not insulting comments about anybody. Because sure as shiat, you'll put that in something (like a newspaper article or ad) intending to replace it with legit text later, it'll get printed. Or appear on a website.

THIS. Our rule was that any placeholder copy had to be lorem ipsum and if they were waiting on a photo or other graphic they had to print a gray box where the graphic was going to go. Absolutely no exceptions.


CS,B: Once I was setting up a headline link and blurb for the home page of our website. The content management system published once an hour and I knew the next publishing cycle was about 30 minutes away.

I typed in the headline, then just as I clicked Save I noticed a typo. So I immediately reopened the home page item to fix it.

And the CMS crashed. And 20 minutes later as I was still on the phone with IT screaming at them to get the preview server back online, the home page updated. An hour later, my mistyped headline was still there and more than 75,000 people had seen it.

I finally FTPed onto the server containing the live home page, edited the home page by hand with a text editor and put it back. IT screamed bloody murder but didn't get much traction since they were responsible for the problem in the first place.

Oh, the typo? It was a headline about MLK. What got published was this:

Remembering Martian Luther King, Jr.

 
2017-08-16 05:57:11 PM  

Super Chronic: mcmnky: LowbrowDeluxe: Surprisingly interesting read.

Really?

I came in to say the opposite. It's a boring article about a boring article.

When it finally after many paragraphs gets to the interesting part--why write about this particular article?--it doesn't get any better.

I doubt I'll ever warm up to the Internet fad of longform essays where the first thing you see is a gigantic graphic and oblique headline and you have no idea what the hell it's about, then you scroll down to read five or six paragraphs and you still have no idea what the hell it's about. (It's especially prevalent in sports writing.) I read a lot but my time is finite, so I have to be at least somewhat selective.

Still, I skimmed this one and think I got the highlights. Enough that I don't feel obligated to post the Mallrats "did he cum or what" meme.


Based on the positive comments above I gave TFA a second chance.

It does eventually have a point, but damn does that author love the sound of his own keys clacking.

That the kid played drums in high school, did we really need that detail? Farking Dickens here being paid by the word.
 
2017-08-16 05:57:12 PM  

assjuice: Tl;dr some manchild snuck dirty words into a sports story and the editor didn't catch it. How does this rate a 50000 word expose?


Said manchild with a minimum-wage job ruined two lives, three careers, and basically bankrupted a small county newspaper via a precedent-setting libel suit with an offhand dirty joke -- it's a career lesson for writers.
 
2017-08-16 06:01:37 PM  

assjuice: Tl;dr some manchild snuck dirty words into a sports story and the editor didn't catch it. How does this rate a 50000 word expose?


The same way the story of an obscure blogger made news all over the world when he was the first one brave (or reckless) enough to publish an unsubstantiated story about Bill Clinton getting blow jobs from an intern--and it turned out he was right.
 
2017-08-16 06:05:14 PM  

Sensei Can You See: assjuice: Tl;dr some manchild snuck dirty words into a sports story and the editor didn't catch it. How does this rate a 50000 word expose?

The same way the story of an obscure blogger made news all over the world when he was the first one brave (or reckless) enough to publish an unsubstantiated story about Bill Clinton getting blow jobs from an intern--and it turned out he was right.


so you're pro-donkey dick?
 
2017-08-16 06:05:14 PM  
Interesting stories
 
2017-08-16 06:06:05 PM  
I was in high school when a classmate brought in a copy of the April 1 edition of The Technique, the Georgia Tech student newspaper. I think his brother was a Tech student. They had re-named the edition Techriques.  The material was funny at the time (suburban Atlanta high school in the 1970's) but I am certain I would be horrified to read it today, or anytime in at least the last 15 years.
 
2017-08-16 06:21:51 PM  
My community college's newspaper was pretty disorganized. The copy was full of errors and it was clear the editor himself had the type of grammar misconceptions that'd get him made fun of on Fark, to put things in perspective. So naturally the paper eventually published a letter to the editor that was fiercely anti-gay. The premise was that "some have asked" the author if gays could go to heaven or some such strawman bullshiat and the author went on a trolltastic rant from there. The letter was about a foot of copy and included the relevant bible quotes. The papers were pulled from locations on campus but I was able to get a copy, which I've kept. Supposedly the letter was put in the paper without the proper editorial meeting process

TLDR: my college had a newspaper editorial team that published Bev*ts.
 
2017-08-16 06:42:42 PM  
i.ytimg.comView Full Size
 
2017-08-16 06:46:14 PM  

mcmnky: LowbrowDeluxe: Surprisingly interesting read.

Really?

I came in to say the opposite. It's a boring article about a boring article.

When it finally after many paragraphs gets to the interesting part--why write about this particular article?--it doesn't get any better.


Exactly.  After far too many enthusiastic and wholly pointless paragraphs I asked myself why I was still reading the drivel.  And I stopped.

This article should itself be a cautionary tale about bad and overly self-indulgent attempts at reporting.
 
2017-08-16 06:54:15 PM  

Far Cough: mcmnky: LowbrowDeluxe: Surprisingly interesting read.

Really?

I came in to say the opposite. It's a boring article about a boring article.

When it finally after many paragraphs gets to the interesting part--why write about this particular article?--it doesn't get any better.

Exactly.  After far too many enthusiastic and wholly pointless paragraphs I asked myself why I was still reading the drivel.  And I stopped.

This article should itself be a cautionary tale about bad and overly self-indulgent attempts at reporting.


That linked article needs editing in the worst way.
Get to the f-ing  point already!
 
2017-08-16 06:55:23 PM  
In a piece of code I had put into a comment:

"This is a total kludge, but laugh while you can monkey boy"

only to get a call from an irate user "why is this program calling me monkey boy?", how he saw it I will never know, but damn was that uncomfortable.
 
2017-08-16 06:58:12 PM  

Thong_of_Zardoz: [i.ytimg.com image 480x360]


I'm not sure if it's the humor I find in stereotypes or the marijuana, but I can't stop laughing at that.  Laughing so hard my face hurts.
 
2017-08-16 07:07:07 PM  

Zero Exponent: Far Cough: mcmnky: LowbrowDeluxe: Surprisingly interesting read.

Really?

I came in to say the opposite. It's a boring article about a boring article.

When it finally after many paragraphs gets to the interesting part--why write about this particular article?--it doesn't get any better.

Exactly.  After far too many enthusiastic and wholly pointless paragraphs I asked myself why I was still reading the drivel.  And I stopped.

This article should itself be a cautionary tale about bad and overly self-indulgent attempts at reporting.

That linked article needs editing in the worst way.
Get to the f-ing  point already!


What I got out of it, yes.  There's an art to rambling - but that writer never even picked up a brush.  Just blah de blah de blah in the worst faux-breathless "Let's over-analyze this shiat to death as foreplay" style.  This is NOT good writing.  The tone is reasonable, the style might be engaging if they didn't beat you to death with it, but the length/actual pertinent info ratio is absolute shiat.  This is not how you do it people.  This reads like someone had to fill a ton of column and only had one subject to do it with - and may the gods have mercy on the readers' eyeballs.
 
2017-08-16 07:11:53 PM  
When I was working at WUBE in Cincinnati back in the 80s, the morning news anchor had a habit of putting fake birthdays and anniversaries on the list for the morning shows female co-host, since she didn't have a clue. It was all fun and games until the morning she wished a happy anniversary to Phil and Connie Lingus.
No one was fired, but it came close.
 
2017-08-16 07:12:19 PM  

hashtag.acronym: Thong_of_Zardoz: [i.ytimg.com image 480x360] I'm not sure if it's the humor I find in stereotypes or the marijuana, but I can't stop laughing at that.  Laughing so hard my face hurts.


Then you'll really like hearing an anchor actually read them out loud...

KTVU news anchor gets pranked by NTSB on Flight 214 pilot names.
Youtube SjUPb4J_MGo
 
2017-08-16 07:14:21 PM  
Heywood Jablome similes at these shenanigans

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/897359/posts
 
2017-08-16 07:18:21 PM  

Matthew Keene: When I was working at WUBE in Cincinnati back in the 80s, the morning news anchor had a habit of putting fake birthdays and anniversaries on the list for the morning shows female co-host, since she didn't have a clue. It was all fun and games until the morning she wished a happy anniversary to Phil and Connie Lingus.
No one was fired, but it came close.


Pretty sure her married name would have been Haisho.
 
2017-08-16 07:21:53 PM  

mcmnky: Super Chronic: mcmnky: LowbrowDeluxe: Surprisingly interesting read.

Really?

I came in to say the opposite. It's a boring article about a boring article.

When it finally after many paragraphs gets to the interesting part--why write about this particular article?--it doesn't get any better.

I doubt I'll ever warm up to the Internet fad of longform essays where the first thing you see is a gigantic graphic and oblique headline and you have no idea what the hell it's about, then you scroll down to read five or six paragraphs and you still have no idea what the hell it's about. (It's especially prevalent in sports writing.) I read a lot but my time is finite, so I have to be at least somewhat selective.

Still, I skimmed this one and think I got the highlights. Enough that I don't feel obligated to post the Mallrats "did he cum or what" meme.

Based on the positive comments above I gave TFA a second chance.

It does eventually have a point, but damn does that author love the sound of his own keys clacking.

That the kid played drums in high school, did we really need that detail? Farking Dickens here being paid by the word.


Seriously, some of you don't get what writing is about. The point of talking about the rookie writer having an interest in music, specifically drums is two-fold:
1) it fills out a picture of who he was and his intentions to give a clearer image of the man and his motives,, and 2) it humanizes him. It's the point of a piece like this.

You could have had a cut-and-dried "20 years ago, some guys weren't careful, so filthy language went out in a small time newspaper. The consequences would be especially damaging to the paper. Some good came of it, as it was used as a lesson for better journalistic practices." Why the fark would someone not in journalism give a god damn about what I just wrote? You ever watch a show or a mini-series based on historical events? Don't you like to see the actors, you know, act? Flesh out the roles? Give you a better understanding of the hows and whys people did what they did? Or at least make them rounded, realistic characters that you might enjoy watching?

Wow. Some of you people. Or perhaps it's just more "hurr I trole, look at me yank chainz".
 
2017-08-16 07:24:02 PM  

Uzzah: hashtag.acronym: Thong_of_Zardoz: [i.ytimg.com image 480x360] I'm not sure if it's the humor I find in stereotypes or the marijuana, but I can't stop laughing at that.  Laughing so hard my face hurts.

Then you'll really like hearing an anchor actually read them out loud...

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/SjUPb4J_MGo - 480x360]


You're right, I did.
 
2017-08-16 07:24:40 PM  

JohnnyApocalypse: mcmnky: Super Chronic: mcmnky: LowbrowDeluxe: Surprisingly interesting read.

Really?

I came in to say the opposite. It's a boring article about a boring article.

When it finally after many paragraphs gets to the interesting part--why write about this particular article?--it doesn't get any better.

I doubt I'll ever warm up to the Internet fad of longform essays where the first thing you see is a gigantic graphic and oblique headline and you have no idea what the hell it's about, then you scroll down to read five or six paragraphs and you still have no idea what the hell it's about. (It's especially prevalent in sports writing.) I read a lot but my time is finite, so I have to be at least somewhat selective.

Still, I skimmed this one and think I got the highlights. Enough that I don't feel obligated to post the Mallrats "did he cum or what" meme.

Based on the positive comments above I gave TFA a second chance.

It does eventually have a point, but damn does that author love the sound of his own keys clacking.

That the kid played drums in high school, did we really need that detail? Farking Dickens here being paid by the word.

Seriously, some of you don't get what writing is about. The point of talking about the rookie writer having an interest in music, specifically drums is two-fold:
1) it fills out a picture of who he was and his intentions to give a clearer image of the man and his motives,, and 2) it humanizes him. It's the point of a piece like this.

You could have had a cut-and-dried "20 years ago, some guys weren't careful, so filthy language went out in a small time newspaper. The consequences would be especially damaging to the paper. Some good came of it, as it was used as a lesson for better journalistic practices." Why the fark would someone not in journalism give a god damn about what I just wrote? You ever watch a show or a mini-series based on historical events? Don't you like to see the actors, you know, act? Flesh out the roles? Give you a better understanding of the hows and whys people did what they did? Or at least make them rounded, realistic characters that you might enjoy watching?

Wow. Some of you people. Or perhaps it's just more "hurr I trole, look at me yank chainz".


No.  Not at all.  Many of us simply don't like bad writing.  The linked article is bad writing.  It fails in its purpose and is poorly executed.
 
2017-08-16 07:25:56 PM  

gonegirl: I worked for three years as a writer and then an editor for my small-beans little college newspaper. We put out an April Fool's edition that was decreed so foul that the editors-in-chief (not me that year) had to apologize to the entire student body before they were allowed to graduate, but our real farkup was:

A local fast-food joint was held up by people who locked the employees in the walk-in freezer, then set fire to the building. I think there were deaths involved, and that the whole thing was an inside job.

What I do remember clearly is our junk, placeholder headline that accidentally made it to press:

"FREEZERBURN!"


Ouch. Mine was much tamer.

When I started college I picked up some pocket money typing articles for the school paper. There was an article in the bin without a byline, so to alert the editor of that I used "By an Irish gentleman whose name eludes me for the moment" (an obvious Monty Python reference for the editor, who I was dating).

He didn't catch it and it went to press like that, disappointing the female author of what I vaguely recall was an article with a feminist perspective.

We printed a correction the next week that included "We're sure you can understand how this happened."

/He did become a professional journalist
//I did not
///I did get a job as a typist when I dropped out of college, though
 
2017-08-16 07:26:27 PM  

JohnnyApocalypse: Wow. Some of you people. Or perhaps it's just more "hurr I trole, look at me yank chainz".


Post a link to your Chaturbate page and I might stop by.
 
2017-08-16 07:32:55 PM  
Here is one of the best ones of all time. KTVO, Channel 3 in Kirksville, Missouri got pranked big time on their morning news.

BirthDay News
Youtube hB94WN1m_OE
 
2017-08-16 07:41:52 PM  

JohnnyApocalypse: mcmnky: Super Chronic: mcmnky: LowbrowDeluxe: Surprisingly interesting read.

Really?

I came in to say the opposite. It's a boring article about a boring article.

When it finally after many paragraphs gets to the interesting part--why write about this particular article?--it doesn't get any better.

I doubt I'll ever warm up to the Internet fad of longform essays where the first thing you see is a gigantic graphic and oblique headline and you have no idea what the hell it's about, then you scroll down to read five or six paragraphs and you still have no idea what the hell it's about. (It's especially prevalent in sports writing.) I read a lot but my time is finite, so I have to be at least somewhat selective.

Still, I skimmed this one and think I got the highlights. Enough that I don't feel obligated to post the Mallrats "did he cum or what" meme.

Based on the positive comments above I gave TFA a second chance.

It does eventually have a point, but damn does that author love the sound of his own keys clacking.

That the kid played drums in high school, did we really need that detail? Farking Dickens here being paid by the word.

Seriously, some of you don't get what writing is about. The point of talking about the rookie writer having an interest in music, specifically drums is two-fold:
1) it fills out a picture of who he was and his intentions to give a clearer image of the man and his motives,, and 2) it humanizes him. It's the point of a piece like this.

You could have had a cut-and-dried "20 years ago, some guys weren't careful, so filthy language went out in a small time newspaper. The consequences would be especially damaging to the paper. Some good came of it, as it was used as a lesson for better journalistic practices." Why the fark would someone not in journalism give a god damn about what I just wrote? You ever watch a show or a mini-series based on historical events? Don't you like to see the actors, you know, act? Flesh out the roles? Give you a b ...


You're right, this is absolutely New Yorker material.
 
2017-08-16 07:52:51 PM  
Geez, I read that whole thing and all I really know is that, indeed, Dixon does suck donkey dicks.
 
Displayed 50 of 78 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report