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(Huffington Post UK)   British cooking soon to benefit from the use of traditional American ingredients like chlorine, petroleum, acid and hormones   ( huffingtonpost.co.uk) divider line
    More: Sick, Scottish-born MP, News Corporation, Simon Heffer, Daily Telegraph, American consumers, spokesperson  
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2590 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Jul 2017 at 8:20 AM (20 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-07-25 04:09:22 AM  
How do you eat chicken when you don't have any teeth?
 
2017-07-25 04:22:25 AM  
I guess I'm not surprised to hear that Europeans are adverse to using animal byproducts in animal feed. After their experience with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, it's no wonder they would try to avoid mixing potentially contaminated animal parts in with the feed.

However the other things don't seem particularly weird or harmful. Some, like the chlorine rinse, make sense.

I'd like to see American farmers improve hygiene, though.
 
2017-07-25 07:07:42 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: I guess I'm not surprised to hear that Europeans are adverse to using animal byproducts in animal feed. After their experience with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, it's no wonder they would try to avoid mixing potentially contaminated animal parts in with the feed.

However the other things don't seem particularly weird or harmful. Some, like the chlorine rinse, make sense.

I'd like to see American farmers improve hygiene, though.


There are some anomalies. Eggs, for example. In the US by law they have to be washed. In the UK by law they must not be washed. Eggs have a natural protective layer that washing removes. It's why eggs in UK supermarkets are out on a shelf and not in a fridge. They don't need refrigeration.
 
2017-07-25 08:30:27 AM  

Ron Vibbentrop: AverageAmericanGuy: I guess I'm not surprised to hear that Europeans are adverse to using animal byproducts in animal feed. After their experience with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, it's no wonder they would try to avoid mixing potentially contaminated animal parts in with the feed.

However the other things don't seem particularly weird or harmful. Some, like the chlorine rinse, make sense.

I'd like to see American farmers improve hygiene, though.

There are some anomalies. Eggs, for example. In the US by law they have to be washed. In the UK by law they must not be washed. Eggs have a natural protective layer that washing removes. It's why eggs in UK supermarkets are out on a shelf and not in a fridge. They don't need refrigeration.


Laws between countries are weird,  what one place thinks is safe another thinks is bad.  In Sweeden kids have to be in the front seat with a car seat, as that's considered safer so the parent can more easily observe the child.  that's a huge no-no in the USA.
 
2017-07-25 08:31:44 AM  
However, the Adam Smith Institute said that chlorinated chickens are sold at a 20 percent discount in the US.

Eh? They aren't labeled as such.
 
2017-07-25 08:32:40 AM  
Fark Dilemma  Alert.

Fark 'Fact': British food is terrible.
TFA: Some British food might become subject to American hygiene and safety standards.
$64 Question: Will this make British food better or worse?

/The Schrödinger's Spotted Dick Paradox.
 
2017-07-25 08:35:34 AM  
I love that 2/5 are these involve washing.

It's like Pasteur and Lister never existed.
 
2017-07-25 08:36:25 AM  

NewportBarGuy: How do you eat chicken when you don't have any teeth?


One leg behind each ear, duh.
 
2017-07-25 08:39:20 AM  
Cannibal animals? That's mad.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-07-25 08:39:24 AM  
So they're getting other things to boil for 7 hours at a high heat?
 
2017-07-25 08:40:04 AM  
Fear mongering to oppose a trade deal?

I'm shocked!!!
 
2017-07-25 08:41:03 AM  
So? Just boil everything a couple more times, it'll be fine.

/I keed.
 
2017-07-25 08:42:49 AM  

stoli n coke: So they're getting other things to boil for 7 hours at a high heat?


*shakes tiny fist
 
2017-07-25 08:45:07 AM  

NewportBarGuy: How do you eat chicken when you don't have any teeth?


That's not how the song goes.

It's "If you don't have your teeth, how can you have any chicken? How can you have any chicken if you don't have your teeth?"
 
2017-07-25 08:49:12 AM  
...and the home of the braAAAAAAve...!

*wipes tear*

#MAGA
 
2017-07-25 08:51:05 AM  

Ron Vibbentrop: AverageAmericanGuy: I guess I'm not surprised to hear that Europeans are adverse to using animal byproducts in animal feed. After their experience with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, it's no wonder they would try to avoid mixing potentially contaminated animal parts in with the feed.

However the other things don't seem particularly weird or harmful. Some, like the chlorine rinse, make sense.

I'd like to see American farmers improve hygiene, though.

There are some anomalies. Eggs, for example. In the US by law they have to be washed. In the UK by law they must not be washed. Eggs have a natural protective layer that washing removes. It's why eggs in UK supermarkets are out on a shelf and not in a fridge. They don't need refrigeration.


That's because the EU takes a very different approach to salmonella. Chickens for human consumption in the EU are basically quarantined* to eliminate salmonella from the stock. Because of this they don't need to wash the eggs, and so the eggs don't need to be frozen. The US takes a different approach that necessitates washing the eggs to ensure they're safe for consumption. Either way the eggs are safe to eat, but from what I understand the US method is cheaper at the expense of eggs that need cold storage.

*IIRC chicken farmers maintain a "parent stock" of chickens that are quarantined and regulary tested for salmonella but aren't intended for human consumption. Their offspring are then raised separately isolated from potential sources of infection.
 
2017-07-25 08:52:50 AM  

Ron Vibbentrop: AverageAmericanGuy: I guess I'm not surprised to hear that Europeans are adverse to using animal byproducts in animal feed. After their experience with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, it's no wonder they would try to avoid mixing potentially contaminated animal parts in with the feed.

However the other things don't seem particularly weird or harmful. Some, like the chlorine rinse, make sense.

I'd like to see American farmers improve hygiene, though.

There are some anomalies. Eggs, for example. In the US by law they have to be washed. In the UK by law they must not be washed. Eggs have a natural protective layer that washing removes. It's why eggs in UK supermarkets are out on a shelf and not in a fridge. They don't need refrigeration.


You typically see egg washing in countries that have had a salmonella outbreak due to eggs. Japan washes their eggs as well, but not the rest of Asia.

/Unwashed eggs are fresher
//I nearly had a panic attack when I saw stacks of unrefrigerated eggs in China
///
 
2017-07-25 08:56:08 AM  
Say what you will about British cuisine, but nobody does fish n chips like they do. That's the one thing I miss most from when I lived over there, I've lost count of the number of fish places here in the states I've tried over the years, none of them come close.
 
2017-07-25 09:00:24 AM  
"It said a person would have to eat three whole chlorinated chickens every day for an extended period before coming to harm. "
I'm betting not even that. I'd also like to find out who said that. I always dislike articles where there are statements with nebulous statements about somebody somewhere sometime said something as if it were a fact.  It is said that a tiger stuck sideways up your bum is an unpleasant experience.
 
2017-07-25 09:03:38 AM  

Ron Vibbentrop: AverageAmericanGuy: I guess I'm not surprised to hear that Europeans are adverse to using animal byproducts in animal feed. After their experience with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, it's no wonder they would try to avoid mixing potentially contaminated animal parts in with the feed.

However the other things don't seem particularly weird or harmful. Some, like the chlorine rinse, make sense.

I'd like to see American farmers improve hygiene, though.

There are some anomalies. Eggs, for example. In the US by law they have to be washed. In the UK by law they must not be washed. Eggs have a natural protective layer that washing removes. It's why eggs in UK supermarkets are out on a shelf and not in a fridge. They don't need refrigeration.


Its worth noting that the difference between the two is usually around washing hands.  In the US the concern is that unwashed eggs will have traces of samonella and as such eggs need to be stored and handled as infection vectors.  Aka they should be washed before being used, whereas in the US it was seen as a convenience not to have to wash ones eggs before using or after handling them.  This falls in with the ethos of the 50's era and following decades which prioritized food convenience and leveraging domestic appliances.
 
2017-07-25 09:07:52 AM  
Chlorine is a natural and major component of any mammal. Tiny amounts of additional chlorine are harmless. Assuming it's PPM isn't high enough to impart a taste. Anyone who has tasted water purified with an "emergency" iodine or bromine tablet will know what I am talking about. lol
 
2017-07-25 09:10:32 AM  
It said a person would have to eat three whole chlorinated chickens every day for an extended period before coming to harm.

DISAPPROVES

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-07-25 09:11:18 AM  
You had a good run, imported French chefs.  Flavortown's closing down.
 
2017-07-25 09:16:31 AM  
I for one want to forcefeed every single brexiteer as much chlorinated chicken as is necessary for them to shiat themselves to death...

I can't believe my countrymen have let us down like this.
 
2017-07-25 09:28:14 AM  
British cooking gets the raw deal. It must be a stereotype.
I've been there, and honestly everything that I ate was delicious and just as good as eating American fast food. (judge that as you will) Now mind you, I didn't get the chance to sit down with a British family and eat their daily routine stuff, but whatever I had in a pub or restaurant was OK and I wasn't disappointed. I've had far worse meals here in the states for the two weeks I was over the pond.
 
2017-07-25 09:35:02 AM  

flemardo: "It said a person would have to eat three whole chlorinated chickens every day for an extended period before coming to harm. "
I'm betting not even that. I'd also like to find out who said that. I always dislike articles where there are statements with nebulous statements about somebody somewhere sometime said something as if it were a fact.  It is said that a tiger stuck sideways up your bum is an unpleasant experience.


Just a thought, maybe you can click the link right above that sentence (which is the "it" that the sentence is referring to) to find out.
 
2017-07-25 09:38:16 AM  
images-na.ssl-images-amazon.comView Full Size


Just add, lots and lots of butter, grease and clotted cream....it will be ok...

/miss these two...
 
2017-07-25 09:50:21 AM  
Brits insure the safety of their eggs by protecting them in a layer of sausage meat:
img.fark.netView Full Size

I am now hungry & missing my departed British mum.
 
2017-07-25 09:56:37 AM  

moel: I for one want to forcefeed every single brexiteer as much chlorinated chicken as is necessary for them to shiat themselves to death...

I can't believe my countrymen have let us down like this.


I'm personally looking forward to the agricultural sector in this dumb farking country getting royally shafted by the likes of the U.S in any 'free' trade deals. They wanted this, they can farking well have it and I'm not going out of my way to help them.
 
2017-07-25 09:56:59 AM  

steklo: [images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com image 600x628]

Just add, lots and lots of butter, grease and clotted cream....it will be ok...

/miss these two...


Me too. I loved that show.
 
2017-07-25 09:58:47 AM  
The other stuff is a little scary, but acid is just part of cooking. Lemon juice, vinegar... it's just part of cooking.  Acid is an important part of how cheese is made, pretty much since cheese was invented.
 
2017-07-25 10:00:43 AM  

oldfarthenry: Brits insure the safety of their eggs by protecting them in a layer of sausage meat:
[img.fark.net image 360x228]
I am now hungry & missing my departed British mum.


Sorry about your mum.
 
2017-07-25 10:01:14 AM  
I'm sure it will be delicious. Just look at this happy chap packing it away:

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-07-25 10:14:11 AM  

steklo: British cooking gets the raw deal. It must be a stereotype.
I've been there, and honestly everything that I ate was delicious and just as good as eating American fast food. (judge that as you will) Now mind you, I didn't get the chance to sit down with a British family and eat their daily routine stuff, but whatever I had in a pub or restaurant was OK and I wasn't disappointed. I've had far worse meals here in the states for the two weeks I was over the pond.


Counterpoint:  the culinary highlight of my trips there is when I manage to eat at McDonalds or Pizza Hut.  The rest of the time can be best described as a series of unfortunate eating events.
 
2017-07-25 10:20:25 AM  

snowjack: oldfarthenry: Brits insure the safety of their eggs by protecting them in a layer of sausage meat:
[img.fark.net image 360x228]
I am now hungry & missing my departed British mum.

Sorry about your mum.


Thanks,
Well, she survived WWII AND British "cuisine".
We were wondering if she was immortal &/or bullet-proof towards the end of her tenure.
 
2017-07-25 10:26:27 AM  

Foghorn of Ignorance: I'm sure it will be delicious. Just look at this happy chap packing it away:

[img.fark.net image 425x318]


It's always worth pointing out that the text in the background of that photo is in cyrillic.
 
2017-07-25 10:38:33 AM  

This text is now purple: Foghorn of Ignorance: I'm sure it will be delicious. Just look at this happy chap packing it away:

[img.fark.net image 425x318]

It's always worth pointing out that the text in the background of that photo is in cyrillic.


Why is that worth pointing out? It completely ruins the joke about Americans being fat. Don't you get that threads about topics like British cooking are built on perpetuating cultural stereotypes irrespective of their basis in fact? Why would you spoil that, why?

/Jeez, everyone's a critic. I give up.
//But then I am French
///See, a 'France surrenders' joke. Much funny no?
 
2017-07-25 10:47:32 AM  

Odoriferous Queef: steklo: [images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com image 600x628]

Just add, lots and lots of butter, grease and clotted cream....it will be ok...

/miss these two...

Me too. I loved that show.


I also miss the Diceman....(he would ask strangers to roll dice for him and based on the numbers, that appeared would fly off or drive to that location and try their local delicacies...)

My local PBS station has been showing season one of British Bake Off (or whatever its called)
20 or so British amateur bakers are told what to bake right then and there and then judged. Loser gets to leave the show...unit one is left. it's been pretty good and I would love to try some of those cakes, pastries, biscuits, etc. Most of them being very specific and having distinct flavors and whatnot.
 
2017-07-25 10:47:41 AM  

This text is now purple: Foghorn of Ignorance: I'm sure it will be delicious. Just look at this happy chap packing it away:

[img.fark.net image 425x318]

It's always worth pointing out that the text in the background of that photo is in cyrillic.


Actually, in that one, it's specifically cropped out.

But yeah, it's either Cyrillic or Georgian.
 
2017-07-25 10:48:44 AM  

Foghorn of Ignorance: This text is now purple: Foghorn of Ignorance: I'm sure it will be delicious. Just look at this happy chap packing it away:

[img.fark.net image 425x318]

It's always worth pointing out that the text in the background of that photo is in cyrillic.

Why is that worth pointing out? It completely ruins the joke about Americans being fat. Don't you get that threads about topics like British cooking are built on perpetuating cultural stereotypes irrespective of their basis in fact? Why would you spoil that, why?

/Jeez, everyone's a critic. I give up.
//But then I am French
///See, a 'France surrenders' joke. Much funny no?


Since you're French, you would know that they're the only ones in England who can cook worth a damn.
 
2017-07-25 10:55:58 AM  
While we're on the subject. Are French Fries really French? What about French Toast?

Steak au poivre is French...and its one of my favorite dishes from ANYWHERE.
 
2017-07-25 11:04:00 AM  

gar1013: steklo: British cooking gets the raw deal. It must be a stereotype.
I've been there, and honestly everything that I ate was delicious and just as good as eating American fast food. (judge that as you will) Now mind you, I didn't get the chance to sit down with a British family and eat their daily routine stuff, but whatever I had in a pub or restaurant was OK and I wasn't disappointed. I've had far worse meals here in the states for the two weeks I was over the pond.

Counterpoint:  the culinary highlight of my trips there is when I manage to eat at McDonalds or Pizza Hut.  The rest of the time can be best described as a series of unfortunate eating events.


Then you chose your eateries badly, there are many good places to eat at all budget levels. People always bang on about fish 'n' chips being quintessentially British. Fish 'n' chips are grease laden average food. When I take none Brits out for a meal in England (which given my in-laws are Spanish, is quite frequently) my first point of call is pie and ale. Follow up jaunts are proper breakfast and pub roast dinner.
 
2017-07-25 11:16:58 AM  

Swiss Colony: gar1013: steklo: British cooking gets the raw deal. It must be a stereotype.
I've been there, and honestly everything that I ate was delicious and just as good as eating American fast food. (judge that as you will) Now mind you, I didn't get the chance to sit down with a British family and eat their daily routine stuff, but whatever I had in a pub or restaurant was OK and I wasn't disappointed. I've had far worse meals here in the states for the two weeks I was over the pond.

Counterpoint:  the culinary highlight of my trips there is when I manage to eat at McDonalds or Pizza Hut.  The rest of the time can be best described as a series of unfortunate eating events.

Then you chose your eateries badly, there are many good places to eat at all budget levels. People always bang on about fish 'n' chips being quintessentially British. Fish 'n' chips are grease laden average food. When I take none Brits out for a meal in England (which given my in-laws are Spanish, is quite frequently) my first point of call is pie and ale. Follow up jaunts are proper breakfast and pub roast dinner.


When I was over there, (I don't eat seafood) I found a bakery in Plymouth that made this hand-held little meat pies...Patsy's or something like that? I dunno what they were called but they were perfect little snacks that I could eat with my hands while walking around taking in the scenery.

My roots are from England, (great grandparents) so I've always been fond of pot-roast and simple working-man's food. (stew, soup, etc)

The one thing I did not like over there was the breakfast sausage (bangers?) . I found it too mushy and mealy. Spices were ok and all but found them too soft over there. Fell in love with Cadburry's and Walker's Crisps at Tesco...yummers...
 
2017-07-25 11:30:01 AM  

Lifeless: This text is now purple: Foghorn of Ignorance: I'm sure it will be delicious. Just look at this happy chap packing it away:

[img.fark.net image 425x318]

It's always worth pointing out that the text in the background of that photo is in cyrillic.

Actually, in that one, it's specifically cropped out.

But yeah, it's either Cyrillic or Georgian.


You think?

A lot of Cyrillic and Latin characters look similar to each other, and Georgian script is quite flowery and curvaceous.

I mean, there are only 7 characters in the uncropped image, but from those few, out of all the non-Latin alphabets used, I always figured it looked closest to Hebrew.

I really don't know though.
 
2017-07-25 11:35:11 AM  

snowjack: The other stuff is a little scary, but acid is just part of cooking. Lemon juice, vinegar... it's just part of cooking.  Acid is an important part of how cheese is made, pretty much since cheese was invented.


This was lactic acid the article was bloviating about.
 
2017-07-25 11:44:52 AM  
steklo:
When I was over there, (I don't eat seafood) I found a bakery in Plymouth that made this hand-held little meat pies...Patsy's or something like that?

That'll be a pasty. If it had potato and swede then it was a Cornish Pasty, which my Grandmother (who was from Cornwall) used to make. Pasties are one of the few things I really miss since leaving the UK. Mature Cheddar, Blue Stilton and decent ale are the others. Luckily my family visit quite regularly :p
 
2017-07-25 12:22:07 PM  

stoli n coke: So they're getting other things to boil for 7 hours at a high heat?


Gosh. How much higher that boiling temperature must be at a high heat!
 
2017-07-25 12:32:22 PM  

NoahBuddy: stoli n coke: So they're getting other things to boil for 7 hours at a high heat?

Gosh. How much higher that boiling temperature must be at a high heat!


You do know the difference between boiling and simmering, right? Like, not every single drop of water in a pot is exactly the same temperature, that when the steam actually leaves the pot, it pulls heat away from the water, that the convection profiles are different at different heat settings, etc...
 
2017-07-25 01:02:47 PM  

Swiss Colony: steklo:
When I was over there, (I don't eat seafood) I found a bakery in Plymouth that made this hand-held little meat pies...Patsy's or something like that?

That'll be a pasty. If it had potato and swede then it was a Cornish Pasty, which my Grandmother (who was from Cornwall) used to make. Pasties are one of the few things I really miss since leaving the UK. Mature Cheddar, Blue Stilton and decent ale are the others. Luckily my family visit quite regularly :p


The ones I had were just meat maybe some onion? if I recall. (I know mine didn't have cheese as I don't like cheese) I was last there in 2001 so my memory is fading. Funny I had nothing to compare them to other then the US's nasty "Hot Pockets"...(a staple in a teenage video gamer's diet)  Here in the states, our bakeries only make fruit (or pudding) filled pies...
 
2017-07-25 01:07:57 PM  

Trocadero: NoahBuddy: stoli n coke: So they're getting other things to boil for 7 hours at a high heat?

Gosh. How much higher that boiling temperature must be at a high heat!

You do know the difference between boiling and simmering, right? Like, not every single drop of water in a pot is exactly the same temperature, that when the steam actually leaves the pot, it pulls heat away from the water, that the convection profiles are different at different heat settings, etc...


I do.

I'll offer you a menu :

. Chlorine-washed chicken, boiled for 7 hours.

. Chlorine-washed chicken, simmered for 7 hours.

If you can tell the difference, the meal is free.
 
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