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(Cracked)   Come for the the $3000 sweat lodge/sex parties, leave grifted and making Native Americans irked at the appropriation of their culture   ( cracked.com) divider line
    More: Asinine, Native Americans in the United States  
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6709 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Jul 2017 at 6:07 PM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-07-01 10:58:36 AM  
Newage types have been using this particular grift for a while. And the fusion of Native American beliefs and Asian philosophies and practices only makes it a bit worse.

Years ago, my ex-wife got involved with one of these kooks, and she loved the attention, and the "spiritual energy" that these proto-cultists were working with. And when I pointed out the inconsistencies, and the OBVIOUS grift involved, I was met with all sorts of ire. Trying to spin Reiki and New Age bullsh*t was only a tiny aspect of the wrong involved, especially with "aura reading" with a machine as part of the f*ckery in trying to make it all seem like a real practice, but to heap insult on the whole thing, the woman involved at the heart of this promising little cult of personality also threw in a ton of dream catchers and feathers to make it seem more "Native." Her tribe was made up. Entirely. She was a little Polish-French woman who really liked to take younger lovers into her open marriage, and in that I suppose, it was like icing on the cake when you toted up the bill for getting near her little proto-cult. Me pointing out the glaring inconsistencies did contribute to our marriage failing, because I didn't support her "spiritual growth."

Growth, mind you, that cost a LOT of money. For seminars. For "readings." For the texts that were written by the wee little grifter. We were already on the outs when she got full in, and I warned her exactly how much fake tripe she was trying to desperately swallow to get in touch with her "roots." And pointing out that the Abenaki--the tribe she DID have some roots with--were NOT an impenetrable force, and had genealogists who had confirmed her relation with their people, albeit a bit back up the line, and they had welcomed her to participate to learn more about them and her heritage...that didn't seem to penetrate her thick skull. And the Abenaki weren't asking for hundreds upon hundreds of dollars in hard earned cash.

I got out. And took my half of our bank account with me. And, predictably, the proto-cult fell apart when the ex-wife realized that it was just a way for the wee Polish-French gal to get in some free lovin' and pad her house with some swanky furniture. And somehow, I was STILL the bad guy in all this mess, because I was the one who spotted the bullsh*t early, and often.

I will readily admit that the experience poisoned a lot of my already low opinion of Newage in general--I pronounce it to rhyme with the sewage that it is. The appropriation of Buddhist systems was one level of wrong that offended me deeply, but to mish-mash a good dozen faith traditions--none of which apparently required any real work or commitment, save the pocket book--was an insult to all the traditions she lifted from. Spiritual growth, and exploration of faith and religion are actually important to me. And this brand of f*ckery just makes me angry. Especially the transparency of the grift involved. I can appreciate a good grift, and this whole mess was just amateur hour the whole way, and my ex-wife is an otherwise intelligent woman, and her falling for this mess...it disappointed me on several levels.

Busting up this sort of thing...it's important work, because there are a LOT of folks who are gulled and more than ready to throw cash at it. And it not only sullies the religious traditions that it tries to "borrow" from, it allows sloppy ass grifters to think that all they have to do is throw in some buzz words and some feathered trinkets to be "Native."

Yes, I'm bitter about this sort of thing.
 
2017-07-01 12:02:55 PM  
Latest SJW/precious snowflake cause?

You go right ahead and "steal" all the stone-age culture you want.  Maybe at some point you'll bother to learn enough about it to appreciate it a bit, but most likely not.
 
2017-07-01 03:22:05 PM  
Cant get much more appropriative than a bunch of white folks saying that they live in Massachusetts.

I suggest that those who wish to banish cultural appropriation start with renaming our states that steal Native names.
 
2017-07-01 03:30:16 PM  
Not even one mention of Elizabeth Warren ?
 
2017-07-01 06:15:12 PM  

cman: Cant get much more appropriative than a bunch of white folks saying that they live in Massachusetts.

I suggest that those who wish to banish cultural appropriation start with renaming our states that steal Native names.


I'd like to have 66% of the treaties still on the books to be enforced.  We get to pick the 66%.
 
2017-07-01 06:25:31 PM  
Had a long chat with a former Sun Dancer and reciepant of a chanunpa early last week, super fascinating.
 
2017-07-01 06:26:34 PM  
Culture, being an abstract, intangible concept, cannot be stolen or appropriated. It can be borrowed, altered, transmitted, propagated, suppressed, destroyed, or even put to venal purposes of which the the culture's more recent transmitters would strongly disapprove, but it cannot be stolen. The word simply does not apply.

I'm frankly surprised that no one has yet patented or trademarked some long-known aspect of this culture or that, and thence gone full RIAA or patent troll.
 
2017-07-01 06:27:11 PM  

LordZorch: Latest SJW/precious snowflake cause?

You go right ahead and "steal" all the stone-age culture you want.  Maybe at some point you'll bother to learn enough about it to appreciate it a bit, but most likely not.


It's Native Political Correctness gone mad
 
2017-07-01 06:27:46 PM  

2wolves: We get to pick the 66%.


I don't know if "we" here means native americans or the newcomers, but I think I can hazard a guess that it'd end up as a significant improvement for the former regardless.
 
2017-07-01 06:31:23 PM  
Given that new age mysticism is all a load of money grabbing hokum, I'm finding it hard to see how it adversely affects those whose hokum they borrow. Is the issue here the wrath of vengeful gods or the wrong people ripping off the suckers?
 
2017-07-01 06:31:30 PM  
There's one tradition that unites all Native American.. fry bread.  Most of them have a fetish for mutton too.
 
2017-07-01 06:32:05 PM  
Keep it up.  I swear I'll get a Ghost Dance going on and bring all my ancestors back to punish the New Agers!

/Just kidding
// Half Sioux
 
2017-07-01 06:33:08 PM  

cman: Cant get much more appropriative than a bunch of white folks saying that they live in Massachusetts.

I suggest that those who wish to banish cultural appropriation start with renaming our states that steal Native names.


My parents were born in North America. That means I am a native American. Isotopes don't lie.

If I don't happen to be Iroquois or Lakota or whatever by blood, that's their loss. Those poor bastards got the business end of the history stick, and no mistake. But, now there's all kinds of new tribes on their old land. The old days are not coming back any time soon. Their only true chance of survival as cultures is to either step, but that's science fiction, or to cooperate with stronger tribes (aka Bostonians, Yinzers, etc.) and guide them in proper ways.

Renaming the few things that still bear native names is like a death sentence for the language and thus the culture. Might as well re-open those creepy Christian schools that brainwashed kids to hate their own culture.
 
2017-07-01 06:35:03 PM  

hubiestubert: Newage types have been using this particular grift for a while. And the fusion of Native American beliefs and Asian philosophies and practices only makes it a bit worse.

Years ago, my ex-wife got involved with one of these kooks, and she loved the attention, and the "spiritual energy" that these proto-cultists were working with. And when I pointed out the inconsistencies, and the OBVIOUS grift involved, I was met with all sorts of ire. Trying to spin Reiki and New Age bullsh*t was only a tiny aspect of the wrong involved, especially with "aura reading" with a machine as part of the f*ckery in trying to make it all seem like a real practice, but to heap insult on the whole thing, the woman involved at the heart of this promising little cult of personality also threw in a ton of dream catchers and feathers to make it seem more "Native." Her tribe was made up. Entirely. She was a little Polish-French woman who really liked to take younger lovers into her open marriage, and in that I suppose, it was like icing on the cake when you toted up the bill for getting near her little proto-cult. Me pointing out the glaring inconsistencies did contribute to our marriage failing, because I didn't support her "spiritual growth."

Growth, mind you, that cost a LOT of money. For seminars. For "readings." For the texts that were written by the wee little grifter. We were already on the outs when she got full in, and I warned her exactly how much fake tripe she was trying to desperately swallow to get in touch with her "roots." And pointing out that the Abenaki--the tribe she DID have some roots with--were NOT an impenetrable force, and had genealogists who had confirmed her relation with their people, albeit a bit back up the line, and they had welcomed her to participate to learn more about them and her heritage...that didn't seem to penetrate her thick skull. And the Abenaki weren't asking for hundreds upon hundreds of dollars in hard earned cash.

I got out. And took my half of our bank account with me. And, predictably, the proto-cult fell apart when the ex-wife realized that it was just a way for the wee Polish-French gal to get in some free lovin' and pad her house with some swanky furniture. And somehow, I was STILL the bad guy in all this mess, because I was the one who spotted the bullsh*t early, and often.

I will readily admit that the experience poisoned a lot of my already low opinion of Newage in general--I pronounce it to rhyme with the sewage that it is. The appropriation of Buddhist systems was one level of wrong that offended me deeply, but to mish-mash a good dozen faith traditions--none of which apparently required any real work or commitment, save the pocket book--was an insult to all the traditions she lifted from. Spiritual growth, and exploration of faith and religion are actually important to me. And this brand of f*ckery just makes me angry. Especially the transparency of the grift involved. I can appreciate a good grift, and this whole mess was just amateur hour the whole way, and my ex-wife is an otherwise intelligent woman, and her falling for this mess...it disappointed me on several levels.

Busting up this sort of thing...it's important work, because there are a LOT of folks who are gulled and more than ready to throw cash at it. And it not only sullies the religious traditions that it tries to "borrow" from, it allows sloppy ass grifters to think that all they have to do is throw in some buzz words and some feathered trinkets to be "Native."

Yes, I'm bitter about this sort of thing.


Is there any type of farked up situation that you don't have a story about? Not asking in a snarky way, just...good lord man, the stories you tell.
 
2017-07-01 06:37:16 PM  
There's a fascinating story of how the Finnish symphonic metal band "Nightwish" got fooled by someone reportedly pretending to be Native American singer/flautist.  The dude even gave the composer and keyboardist for the band a "Native American Naming Ceremony."

The entire saga played itself out on the Nightwish fan forums, discovered initially by a fan who was Native American and recognized that the person supposedly chanting in the Lakota language was actually not.

I did a quick Google search and came up with this link:  http://www.nightwishonline.com/index.php?/forums/topic/1026-john-two-​h​awks/

A very interesting read.
 
2017-07-01 06:39:07 PM  

aagrajag: Culture, being an abstract, intangible concept, cannot be stolen or appropriated. It can be borrowed, altered, transmitted, propagated, suppressed, destroyed, or even put to venal purposes of which the the culture's more recent transmitters would strongly disapprove, but it cannot be stolen. The word simply does not apply.

I'm frankly surprised that no one has yet patented or trademarked some long-known aspect of this culture or that, and thence gone full RIAA or patent troll.


You're blinding me with your whiteness. Cut it out.
 
2017-07-01 06:39:52 PM  
You can't fool me, it's turtles all the way down.
 
2017-07-01 06:40:22 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-07-01 06:40:45 PM  

bagumpity: There's a fascinating story of how the Finnish symphonic metal band "Nightwish" got fooled by someone reportedly pretending to be Native American singer/flautist.  The dude even gave the composer and keyboardist for the band a "Native American Naming Ceremony."

The entire saga played itself out on the Nightwish fan forums, discovered initially by a fan who was Native American and recognized that the person supposedly chanting in the Lakota language was actually not.

I did a quick Google search and came up with this link:  http://www.nightwishonline.com/index.php?/forums/topic/1026-john-two-h​awks/

A very interesting read.


As a listener of Nightwish songs, always wondered about that guy, and didn't think he looked very "Indian."
 
2017-07-01 06:44:57 PM  
Crazy Talk
Youtube XXQ58P4e7Cc
 
2017-07-01 06:45:32 PM  

LoneWolf343: aagrajag: Culture, being an abstract, intangible concept, cannot be stolen or appropriated. It can be borrowed, altered, transmitted, propagated, suppressed, destroyed, or even put to venal purposes of which the the culture's more recent transmitters would strongly disapprove, but it cannot be stolen. The word simply does not apply.

I'm frankly surprised that no one has yet patented or trademarked some long-known aspect of this culture or that, and thence gone full RIAA or patent troll.

You're blinding me with your whiteness. Cut it out.


I'm terribly sorry. Would you be so kind as to conduct a genetic analysis of my ethnic background and determine which cultural practices, and to what degree, I might be generously permitted to adopt or practice?
 
2017-07-01 06:46:58 PM  
"You very often see this idea that you can mix and match, so you have someone mixing Cherokee and Lakota and Apache altogether, when they're extremely different from each other."

They took the best parts of them and created their own "How to live like a native American"  type of thing. So what? The entire new age movement is based on cherry picking bits and pieces of various cultures/religions and creating a new brand of lifestyle out of it.

"Actual practitioners of Native American religions don't charge for access to ceremonies. If you see someone charging for time in a sweat lodge, you know they're full of shiat."

So someone "appropriated" an idea from your culture and decided to make a quick buck off of it. Coming from a race that takes in billions of dollars a year through tax exempt casinos I find this hilarious.

Committing outright fraud is one thing, but taking ideas from one culture and incorporating them into your own life is more of a testament to that cultures influence, take it as a compliment.
 
2017-07-01 06:48:07 PM  

backhand.slap.of.reason: There's one tradition that unites all Native American.. fry bread.  Most of them have a fetish for mutton too.


They appropriated it from my German ancestors then.
 
2017-07-01 06:49:05 PM  

Jake Havechek: Keep it up.  I swear I'll get a Ghost Dance going on and bring all my ancestors back to punish the New Agers!

/Just kidding
// Half Sioux


The article would suggest you are a liar and appropriating because you wouldn't call yourself that.
 
2017-07-01 06:50:41 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Committing outright fraud is one thing, but taking ideas from one culture and incorporating them into your own life is more of a testament to that cultures influence, take it as a compliment.


But that's what guy in TFA does, he goes after people who commit outright fraud
 
2017-07-01 06:52:18 PM  

doglover: cman: Cant get much more appropriative than a bunch of white folks saying that they live in Massachusetts.

I suggest that those who wish to banish cultural appropriation start with renaming our states that steal Native names.

My parents were born in North America. That means I am a native American. Isotopes don't lie.

If I don't happen to be Iroquois or Lakota or whatever by blood, that's their loss. Those poor bastards got the business end of the history stick, and no mistake. But, now there's all kinds of new tribes on their old land. The old days are not coming back any time soon. Their only true chance of survival as cultures is to either step, but that's science fiction, or to cooperate with stronger tribes (aka Bostonians, Yinzers, etc.) and guide them in proper ways.

Renaming the few things that still bear native names is like a death sentence for the language and thus the culture. Might as well re-open those creepy Christian schools that brainwashed kids to hate their own culture.


The plains horse culture lasted a grand total of maybe 200 years tops and the Sioux were invaders from the east having been pushed there.  And they were widely hated by all other tribes.  So I'm not sure we need to treat all tribes as being the same as the article mentions.  Some of them were just...well...tribal
 
2017-07-01 06:55:16 PM  
"They also practice group anal masturbation, with objects,"

I'm not generally grossed out by butt stuff, but I have a couple of problems with this.

Problem #1?
Whenever any kind of group sex happens the people that do it aren't the people you want to imagine are doing it.

Problem #2?
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-07-01 06:57:01 PM  
Nobody?  NOBODY???  Come on!

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-07-01 06:57:51 PM  

2wolves: cman: Cant get much more appropriative than a bunch of white folks saying that they live in Massachusetts.

I suggest that those who wish to banish cultural appropriation start with renaming our states that steal Native names.

I'd like to have 66% of the treaties still on the books to be enforced.  We get to pick the 66%.


i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2017-07-01 06:58:52 PM  

bagumpity: There's a fascinating story of how the Finnish symphonic metal band "Nightwish" got fooled by someone reportedly pretending to be Native American singer/flautist.  The dude even gave the composer and keyboardist for the band a "Native American Naming Ceremony."

The entire saga played itself out on the Nightwish fan forums, discovered initially by a fan who was Native American and recognized that the person supposedly chanting in the Lakota language was actually not.

I did a quick Google search and came up with this link:  http://www.nightwishonline.com/index.php?/forums/topic/1026-john-two-h​awks/

A very interesting read.


Knew right away what song that referred to without clicking the link.  I had heard about the story before though.
 
2017-07-01 07:00:55 PM  

LewDux: ReapTheChaos: Committing outright fraud is one thing, but taking ideas from one culture and incorporating them into your own life is more of a testament to that cultures influence, take it as a compliment.

But that's what guy in TFA does, he goes after people who commit outright fraud


That depends on how you define fraud. The guy in the article seems to be painting with a rather wide brush, claiming that anything based on their culture is fraud unless it comes from someone that meets his definition of a true Native American.
 
2017-07-01 07:03:45 PM  

brandent: The plains horse culture lasted a grand total of maybe 200 years tops


The second time. There were horses 10,000 years earlier. Who the fark knows who is the first horse/plains culture or how that even played out. Certainly not the same because the horses were smaller.
 
2017-07-01 07:05:50 PM  

LewDux: ReapTheChaos: Committing outright fraud is one thing, but taking ideas from one culture and incorporating them into your own life is more of a testament to that cultures influence, take it as a compliment.

But that's what guy in TFA does, he goes after people who commit outright fraud


Just to address the very beginning of the article, the man complains that others are claiming that things such as Atlantis and astrology are part of native tradition when they are not. So what? How would this constitute fraud, especially when the idiots buying into it cannot demonstrate the deception to have harmed them in any significant way?

How does conflating one group's pseudo-scientific woo, Atlantis, with another group's pre-scientific woo, native American shamanism constitute fraud?
 
2017-07-01 07:05:51 PM  
This.
Crack pretty much nailed it.
Unfortunately there is the other side of the fence.
 
2017-07-01 07:08:54 PM  
I have always wondered why people hang a dream catcher on their rear view mirror. Are they sleeping in their cars?
 
2017-07-01 07:09:50 PM  

doglover: brandent: The plains horse culture lasted a grand total of maybe 200 years tops

The second time. There were horses 10,000 years earlier. Who the fark knows who is the first horse/plains culture or how that even played out. Certainly not the same because the horses were smaller.


The native American horses were never domesticated,  just hunted for food.
 
2017-07-01 07:11:54 PM  

doglover: Jake Havechek: served the Union Army the most crushing defeat ever


Hoka he is a good battle cry, and I'm gonna let you finish, but the Shawnees and Buckongahelas handed the Union Army their greatest defeat of all time. OF ALL TIME!


Agreed, but jackass Custer getting his ass handed to him, probably literally, was a good thing.
 
2017-07-01 07:12:35 PM  

aagrajag: LewDux: ReapTheChaos: Committing outright fraud is one thing, but taking ideas from one culture and incorporating them into your own life is more of a testament to that cultures influence, take it as a compliment.

But that's what guy in TFA does, he goes after people who commit outright fraud

Just to address the very beginning of the article, the man complains that others are claiming that things such as Atlantis and astrology are part of native tradition when they are not. So what? How would this constitute fraud, especially when the idiots buying into it cannot demonstrate the deception to have harmed them in any significant way?

How does conflating one group's pseudo-scientific woo, Atlantis, with another group's pre-scientific woo, native American shamanism constitute fraud?


fraud
[frawd] 1.deceit, trickery, sharp practice, or breach of confidence, perpetrated for profit or to gain some unfair or dishonest advantage.
 
2017-07-01 07:14:12 PM  

ReapTheChaos: LewDux: ReapTheChaos: Committing outright fraud is one thing, but taking ideas from one culture and incorporating them into your own life is more of a testament to that cultures influence, take it as a compliment.

But that's what guy in TFA does, he goes after people who commit outright fraud

That depends on how you define fraud. The guy in the article seems to be painting with a rather wide brush, claiming that anything based on their culture is fraud unless it comes from someone that meets his definition of a true Native American.


And he makes the determination of exactly whom is "pure" enough to claim this cultural inheritance.

Such a judgment could become complicated. I wonder if he has a convenient chart from which to work.

img.fark.netView Full Size


I'm only trolling very slightly here. This guy's entire argument seems to be that "culture" is only real and legitimate if its practitioner is both of a certain ethnic background and genuinely believes in the woo he's peddling. Anything else is "fraud". That medicine bag and those healing crystals and that reiki treatment don't cure cancer any more effectively even if you really believe in them.
 
2017-07-01 07:14:18 PM  

SteveFU: I have always wondered why people hang a dream catcher on their rear view mirror. Are they sleeping in their cars?


This is an excellent example. The guy in the article would say you're committing fraud and insulting his heritage by doing that, whereas the guy hanging it from his rear view just thought it was a cool looking decoration.
 
2017-07-01 07:14:40 PM  

Jake Havechek: Agreed, but jackass Custer getting his ass handed to him, probably literally,


Nah. He was mutiliated, but his ass was literally intact.

If you want the details, they're out there. Let's just say that the ladies gave him something to chew on in the afterlife. Rhymes with fizz phown nesticles.
 
2017-07-01 07:21:26 PM  

Jake Havechek: Keep it up.  I swear I'll get a Ghost Dance going on and bring all my ancestors back to punish the New Agers!

/Just kidding
// Half Sioux


Don't be a tease. I want to Shadowrun with mad magic skills.
 
2017-07-01 07:29:15 PM  

2wolves: cman: Cant get much more appropriative than a bunch of white folks saying that they live in Massachusetts.

I suggest that those who wish to banish cultural appropriation start with renaming our states that steal Native names.

I'd like to have 66% of the treaties still on the books to be enforced.  We get to pick the 66%.


Favorite. Hope you like green
 
2017-07-01 07:29:53 PM  

hubiestubert: Newage types have been using this particular grift for a while. And the fusion of Native American beliefs and Asian philosophies and practices only makes it a bit worse.

Years ago, my ex-wife got involved with one of these kooks, and she loved the attention, and the "spiritual energy" that these proto-cultists were working with. And when I pointed out the inconsistencies, and the OBVIOUS grift involved, I was met with all sorts of ire. Trying to spin Reiki and New Age bullsh*t was only a tiny aspect of the wrong involved, especially with "aura reading" with a machine as part of the f*ckery in trying to make it all seem like a real practice, but to heap insult on the whole thing, the woman involved at the heart of this promising little cult of personality also threw in a ton of dream catchers and feathers to make it seem more "Native." Her tribe was made up. Entirely. She was a little Polish-French woman who really liked to take younger lovers into her open marriage, and in that I suppose, it was like icing on the cake when you toted up the bill for getting near her little proto-cult. Me pointing out the glaring inconsistencies did contribute to our marriage failing, because I didn't support her "spiritual growth."

Growth, mind you, that cost a LOT of money. For seminars. For "readings." For the texts that were written by the wee little grifter. We were already on the outs when she got full in, and I warned her exactly how much fake tripe she was trying to desperately swallow to get in touch with her "roots." And pointing out that the Abenaki--the tribe she DID have some roots with--were NOT an impenetrable force, and had genealogists who had confirmed her relation with their people, albeit a bit back up the line, and they had welcomed her to participate to learn more about them and her heritage...that didn't seem to penetrate her thick skull. And the Abenaki weren't asking for hundreds upon hundreds of dollars in hard earned cash.

I got out. And took my half of our bank account with me. And, predictably, the proto-cult fell apart when the ex-wife realized that it was just a way for the wee Polish-French gal to get in some free lovin' and pad her house with some swanky furniture. And somehow, I was STILL the bad guy in all this mess, because I was the one who spotted the bullsh*t early, and often.

I will readily admit that the experience poisoned a lot of my already low opinion of Newage in general--I pronounce it to rhyme with the sewage that it is. The appropriation of Buddhist systems was one level of wrong that offended me deeply, but to mish-mash a good dozen faith traditions--none of which apparently required any real work or commitment, save the pocket book--was an insult to all the traditions she lifted from. Spiritual growth, and exploration of faith and religion are actually important to me. And this brand of f*ckery just makes me angry. Especially the transparency of the grift involved. I can appreciate a good grift, and this whole mess was just amateur hour the whole way, and my ex-wife is an otherwise intelligent woman, and her falling for this mess...it disappointed me on several levels.

Busting up this sort of thing...it's important work, because there are a LOT of folks who are gulled and more than ready to throw cash at it. And it not only sullies the religious traditions that it tries to "borrow" from, it allows sloppy ass grifters to think that all they have to do is throw in some buzz words and some feathered trinkets to be "Native."

Yes, I'm bitter about this sort of thing.


I have a magnetic bracelet that will eradicate the lingering psychic pain from this trauma. And it cures athletes' foot.
Send me your credit card number, the 3 digit code on the back of the card, and your name (as it appears on the card) and address.
 
2017-07-01 07:31:28 PM  

LewDux: aagrajag: LewDux: ReapTheChaos: Committing outright fraud is one thing, but taking ideas from one culture and incorporating them into your own life is more of a testament to that cultures influence, take it as a compliment.

But that's what guy in TFA does, he goes after people who commit outright fraud

Just to address the very beginning of the article, the man complains that others are claiming that things such as Atlantis and astrology are part of native tradition when they are not. So what? How would this constitute fraud, especially when the idiots buying into it cannot demonstrate the deception to have harmed them in any significant way?

How does conflating one group's pseudo-scientific woo, Atlantis, with another group's pre-scientific woo, native American shamanism constitute fraud?

fraud
[frawd] 1.deceit, trickery, sharp practice, or breach of confidence, perpetrated for profit or to gain some unfair or dishonest advantage.


"Fraud" has two very different meanings in colloquial and legal use. The article and the man featured within it appear to be deliberately conflating the two.
 
2017-07-01 07:32:15 PM  

aagrajag: LewDux: ReapTheChaos: Committing outright fraud is one thing, but taking ideas from one culture and incorporating them into your own life is more of a testament to that cultures influence, take it as a compliment.

But that's what guy in TFA does, he goes after people who commit outright fraud

Just to address the very beginning of the article, the man complains that others are claiming that things such as Atlantis and astrology are part of native tradition when they are not. So what? How would this constitute fraud, especially when the idiots buying into it cannot demonstrate the deception to have harmed them in any significant way?

How does conflating one group's pseudo-scientific woo, Atlantis, with another group's pre-scientific woo, native American shamanism constitute fraud?


Just because you think religion is inherently fraudulent doesn't mean obviously farking fraud isn't fraud.
 
2017-07-01 07:34:27 PM  

doglover: cman: Cant get much more appropriative than a bunch of white folks saying that they live in Massachusetts.

I suggest that those who wish to banish cultural appropriation start with renaming our states that steal Native names.

My parents were born in North America. That means I am a native American. Isotopes don't lie.

If I don't happen to be Iroquois or Lakota or whatever by blood, that's their loss. Those poor bastards got the business end of the history stick, and no mistake. But, now there's all kinds of new tribes on their old land. The old days are not coming back any time soon. Their only true chance of survival as cultures is to either step, but that's science fiction, or to cooperate with stronger tribes (aka Bostonians, Yinzers, etc.) and guide them in proper ways.

Renaming the few things that still bear native names is like a death sentence for the language and thus the culture. Might as well re-open those creepy Christian schools that brainwashed kids to hate their own culture.


I'm 1/4 Choctaw and 1/4 Delaware (Lenni-Lenape) and I've often said the same thing about who should be called native American. Native American is a term used primarily by those who believe it to be politically correct. But if you ever encounter those of us with true tribal ancestry, you'll find we generally refer to ourselves as Indian, or we refer to our tribe. Hell, I still receive my healthcare at The Sapulpa Indian Health Center.
 
2017-07-01 07:37:02 PM  

Dafatone: farking fraud


Is that when you just say "Oh OH!" and then spit on her back?
 
2017-07-01 07:37:03 PM  
Cultural appropriation is just another excuse for misguided millennials to compartmentalize their interior modern guilt.
Or some shiat.  I could give a damn about the Washington Redskins or whatever.

I carry my ancestry in my heart, doesn't matter what anyone else says.  How "genuine" they think they are or not. (Fark off Liz Warren).

The dead heart lives here.(Midnight Oil reference for you young 'uns)
 
2017-07-01 07:37:33 PM  

Dafatone: aagrajag: LewDux: ReapTheChaos: Committing outright fraud is one thing, but taking ideas from one culture and incorporating them into your own life is more of a testament to that cultures influence, take it as a compliment.

But that's what guy in TFA does, he goes after people who commit outright fraud

Just to address the very beginning of the article, the man complains that others are claiming that things such as Atlantis and astrology are part of native tradition when they are not. So what? How would this constitute fraud, especially when the idiots buying into it cannot demonstrate the deception to have harmed them in any significant way?

How does conflating one group's pseudo-scientific woo, Atlantis, with another group's pre-scientific woo, native American shamanism constitute fraud?

Just because you think religion is inherently fraudulent doesn't mean obviously farking fraud isn't fraud.


I too hate it when I've purchased what I was told was a healing crystal blessed by a native American shaman, only to discover it was sanctified by a fat Italian guy named Enzo.

"Insist on only genuine, certified bullshiat! Look for the Seal of Woo!"
 
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