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(The Register)   Considering migrating to Microsoft's cloud? Not everything is just ducky. Here's what what they won't tell you, what you need to know   ( theregister.co.uk) divider line
    More: Followup, E-mail, cloud, cloud migration, new cloud email, cloud data migrations, cloud directory service, migration tool, support TLS encryption  
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3273 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Jun 2017 at 3:50 PM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-06-19 09:09:05 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-06-19 01:42:00 PM  
That was a pointless "article." Should have just posted the "why move to us"  guides from Microsoft.
 
2017-06-19 04:15:12 PM  
Oh yay, this thread where the olds tell us the cloud is just someone else's computer. a

"Ha ha good luck when the Internet is down. I've got everything safe here on this bad boy!" *pats Packard Bell 486*
 
2017-06-19 04:17:44 PM  

Cubansaltyballs: That was a pointless "article." Should have just posted the "why move to us"  guides from Microsoft.


It's The Register, Fark's favorite anti-Microsoft site. Never mind that Microsoft actually does farking tell you all of this, if you RTFM, many of the "issues" they describe have nothing to do with Microsoft specifically - they generally affect the cloud. Even their own goddamned "article" notes that in a couple of places.
 
2017-06-19 04:20:42 PM  
that file name length issue is something that effects hyper-v too. see it a lot with CSPs who want to name their files 'customer_name_at_customer_location_at_customers_individual_last_name_​email_address_server_name_server_type_CSV_location_CSV's_uncles_second​_brothers_ex_roomates_snapchat_address' and then complain that they get an error anytime they try and move or manipulate it.
 
2017-06-19 04:26:37 PM  
That almost even comes off as an endorsement of Microsoft. After all, most of the issues mentioned are endemic to cloud computing, whether provided by Amazon or Microsoft. But the article doesn't even mention Amazon, which would lead the reader to believe that Microsoft is the leader of that industry, when in fact Amazon's business is many times larger than that of Microsoft or other competitors.
 
2017-06-19 04:28:34 PM  

FormlessOne: Cubansaltyballs: That was a pointless "article." Should have just posted the "why move to us"  guides from Microsoft.

It's The Register, Fark's favorite anti-Microsoft site. Never mind that Microsoft actually does farking tell you all of this, if you RTFM, many of the "issues" they describe have nothing to do with Microsoft specifically - they generally affect the cloud. Even their own goddamned "article" notes that in a couple of places.


The Register wants to be the Daily Mail of the tech press.  They run trolly articles shiatting on every major computer company: Microsoft, Apple, Google, whoever.
 
2017-06-19 04:28:38 PM  
I know it's a cloud.  I know it's run by someone not me.  That's all I need to know to know that I will never willingly put a byte of information on it.

If and when I want a cloud, I'll build it and secure it myself.
 
2017-06-19 04:31:32 PM  
img.fark.net

Sticking with End Frame.
 
2017-06-19 04:33:26 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: I know it's a cloud.  I know it's run by someone not me.  That's all I need to know to know that I will never willingly put a byte of information on it.

If and when I want a cloud, I'll build it and secure it myself.


This. Some of us know how to RDP to our own backed up workstations at home from anywhere.
 
2017-06-19 04:33:48 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: I know it's a cloud.  I know it's run by someone not me.  That's all I need to know to know that I will never willingly put a byte of information on it.

If and when I want a cloud, I'll build it and secure it myself.


the cloud isn't really for end users at this point, outside of being able to use it as an offsite backup location of small amounts of critical personal data. no significant number of people are replacing the laptop in their home office with an amazon hosted personal VDI at this point and none of the cloud providers are really trying to make that a thing.
 
2017-06-19 04:41:33 PM  
After migrating my Exchange server to the o365, will I migrate my data... not a farking chance.
 
2017-06-19 04:48:52 PM  

jaytkay: Oh yay, this thread where the olds tell us the cloud is just someone else's computer. a

"Ha ha good luck when the Internet is down. I've got everything safe here on this bad boy!" *pats Packard Bell 486*


You don't have to be an old to want to control your own data.
 
2017-06-19 04:49:11 PM  
There is only ONE instance where I would contemplate using Microsoft Cloud.

If I were operating a shady business, possibly a non-profit, and was embezzling every last cent of the funding, I would store ALL of the financial documents on Microsoft Cloud. Not only would the files be encrypted and decentralized, Microsoft would undoubtedly corrupt or otherwise lose all the data, the proof of my malfeasance.

Sorry, Investigators.
¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 
2017-06-19 04:55:21 PM  

Butternut Squanch: There is only ONE instance where I would contemplate using Microsoft Cloud.

If I were operating a shady business, possibly a non-profit, and was embezzling every last cent of the funding, I would store ALL of the financial documents on Microsoft Cloud. Not only would the files be encrypted and decentralized, Microsoft would undoubtedly corrupt or otherwise lose all the data, the proof of my malfeasance.

Sorry, Investigators.
¯\_(ツ)_/¯


I assume, like all Skype data, Microsoft forwards all cloud data immediately to the NSA.
 
2017-06-19 05:06:48 PM  

chaoswolf: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: I know it's a cloud.  I know it's run by someone not me.  That's all I need to know to know that I will never willingly put a byte of information on it.

If and when I want a cloud, I'll build it and secure it myself.

This. Some of us know how to RDP to our own backed up workstations at home from anywhere.


Which misses the point of it. The point is that this stuff isn't arcana, it's IT services as a commodity. I've managed co-located servers and services, I've managed on-site servers and services. Quite frankly, Microsoft or Amazon can do a better job at a lower cost.

I can implement geographically redundant services that are monitored 24/7 in Azure by clicking a checkbox. It takes just a bit more when I'm building the hardware from scratch.
 
2017-06-19 05:07:05 PM  

HempHead: Butternut Squanch: There is only ONE instance where I would contemplate using Microsoft Cloud.

If I were operating a shady business, possibly a non-profit, and was embezzling every last cent of the funding, I would store ALL of the financial documents on Microsoft Cloud. Not only would the files be encrypted and decentralized, Microsoft would undoubtedly corrupt or otherwise lose all the data, the proof of my malfeasance.

Sorry, Investigators.
¯\_(ツ)_/¯

I assume, like all Skype data, Microsoft forwards all cloud data immediately to the NSA.


Oh fark. ok, see ya...
 
2017-06-19 05:10:12 PM  
Bows and flows of angel hair
 
2017-06-19 05:11:59 PM  

Random Anonymous Blackmail: After migrating my Exchange server to the o365, will I migrate my data... not a farking chance.


I've migrated an Exchange server into GApps for Business.  I'd do it again in a heartbeat.  The Gapps office suite may be lacking compared with Word and Excel, but at the price point per user, the email, spam filter, and pre-screen virus check made it well worth it.  The cloud features were just an extra bonus.

The only issues I ever ran into were the few management types who refused to let go of outlook.
 
2017-06-19 05:14:49 PM  

jaytkay: Oh yay, this thread where the olds tell us the cloud is just someone else's computer. a

"Ha ha good luck when the Internet is down. I've got everything safe here on this bad boy!" *pats Packard Bell 486*


I'm getting close to 63 years old, and my 'Packard Bell 486' is a Synology DS-1815+ NAS with 22 TB of disk space in a RAID-5 + Hot Spare.  I have it connected to my own Active Directory domain (2 DCs for redundancy) behind a hardware firewall appliance with DMZ capability.  Anytime I want a cloud, I will set up an exposed and protected way to access from the outside - and limit access to my own devices.

Sure, something can still go wrong.  But I won't have to worry about the host / vendor or other tenants screwing the pooch.  I'll be limited to my own mistakes, and I am comfortable owning up to them if/when I make them.  God knows, there have been times when I had to.

Point is, idiocy is not restricted to any age group.  There are geniuses and nincompoops in the Boomer set, and also in the Millennials.  That's life.
 
2017-06-19 05:18:00 PM  

Mr. Eugenides: chaoswolf: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: I know it's a cloud.  I know it's run by someone not me.  That's all I need to know to know that I will never willingly put a byte of information on it.

If and when I want a cloud, I'll build it and secure it myself.

This. Some of us know how to RDP to our own backed up workstations at home from anywhere.

Which misses the point of it. The point is that this stuff isn't arcana, it's IT services as a commodity. I've managed co-located servers and services, I've managed on-site servers and services. Quite frankly, Microsoft or Amazon can do a better job at a lower cost.


Oh, agreed.  I won't argue that point at all.  I can only speak to my own case.  I take this approach because of personal preference, and as a fun hobby, not for cost savings.  Doesn't hurt that I also get to learn things in the process.
 
2017-06-19 05:18:40 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: jaytkay: Oh yay, this thread where the olds tell us the cloud is just someone else's computer. a

"Ha ha good luck when the Internet is down. I've got everything safe here on this bad boy!" *pats Packard Bell 486*

I'm getting close to 63 years old, and my 'Packard Bell 486' is a Synology DS-1815+ NAS with 22 TB of disk space in a RAID-5 + Hot Spare.  I have it connected to my own Active Directory domain (2 DCs for redundancy) behind a hardware firewall appliance with DMZ capability.  Anytime I want a cloud, I will set up an exposed and protected way to access from the outside - and limit access to my own devices.

Sure, something can still go wrong.  But I won't have to worry about the host / vendor or other tenants screwing the pooch.  I'll be limited to my own mistakes, and I am comfortable owning up to them if/when I make them.  God knows, there have been times when I had to.

Point is, idiocy is not restricted to any age group.  There are geniuses and nincompoops in the Boomer set, and also in the Millennials.  That's life.


Oh...I see you didn't spring for the RP version on that synology.....you really like to play with fire, don't you?
 
2017-06-19 05:27:20 PM  

FormlessOne: Cubansaltyballs: That was a pointless "article." Should have just posted the "why move to us"  guides from Microsoft.

It's The Register, Fark's favorite anti-Microsoft site. Never mind that Microsoft actually does farking tell you all of this, if you RTFM, many of the "issues" they describe have nothing to do with Microsoft specifically - they generally affect the cloud. Even their own goddamned "article" notes that in a couple of places.


This
 
2017-06-19 05:29:14 PM  
As someone who had 3 simultaneous SAS drive failures in my hyper-v server (which includes our work's exchange server) at the co-location last Friday - I'm seriously contemplating moving our exchange services to Office 365. RAID 6 wasn't enough to keep us running.

Also, I found this to be quite interesting, as recently we've started hitting the 260 character limit on our network drives:

"With the arrival of NTFS we were allowed a glorious 260 characters in a full file path and we use it as much as we can today. Why? Because search sucks and a structure with detailed file names is our only hope of ever finding things again on-prem. Long file names (including long-named and deeply nested folders) will cause you grief with most cloud data migrations.

If you don't run into migration issues with this, just wait until you start syncing. We've seen it both with OneDrive and Google Drive and on Macs too. Re-educate your users and come up with a new, shorter naming standard. And watch out for Microsoft lifting the 260-character limitation in Windows 10 version 1607. Fortunately, it's opt-in."


Why should I "watch out" for that? It's awesome they're finally getting rid of that.
 
2017-06-19 05:48:18 PM  

Driedsponge: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: jaytkay: Oh yay, this thread where the olds tell us the cloud is just someone else's computer. a

"Ha ha good luck when the Internet is down. I've got everything safe here on this bad boy!" *pats Packard Bell 486*

I'm getting close to 63 years old, and my 'Packard Bell 486' is a Synology DS-1815+ NAS with 22 TB of disk space in a RAID-5 + Hot Spare.  I have it connected to my own Active Directory domain (2 DCs for redundancy) behind a hardware firewall appliance with DMZ capability.  Anytime I want a cloud, I will set up an exposed and protected way to access from the outside - and limit access to my own devices.

Sure, something can still go wrong.  But I won't have to worry about the host / vendor or other tenants screwing the pooch.  I'll be limited to my own mistakes, and I am comfortable owning up to them if/when I make them.  God knows, there have been times when I had to.

Point is, idiocy is not restricted to any age group.  There are geniuses and nincompoops in the Boomer set, and also in the Millennials.  That's life.

Oh...I see you didn't spring for the RP version on that synology.....you really like to play with fire, don't you?


I don't think that version was available when I bought.  When did it come out?  (Heck, I thought I was ordering an 1813+, and received the 1815.)

Redundant Power is *very* nice, and I've always said that the single power supply was the one thing I liked least about Synology.  But to go with the RP, I would have to either get the 815RP and add an expansion unit, or go for the 2416RP.  I somehow suspect that would have been a lot more expensive.

So, I stick with my 1815+ and have it running off of a nice big UPS, and in a year or two, I expect to add the whole-house generator, running off my natural gas line.  The one power supply in the NAS is definitely the weak point, but if I keep the incoming power as clean as possible, I can hope.

I can also get a couple of 10 TB drives in IcyDock chassis to plug into the NAS and back it up every so often.

It would make life so much easier if they would go to the really great stuff first, instead of waiting till I implement something, and then rolling out the advances.  ;-)

Thanks for the pointer.  I'll save that recommendation for next time I set one up.
 
2017-06-19 05:50:08 PM  
what what?
 
2017-06-19 06:07:17 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Driedsponge: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: jaytkay: Oh yay, this thread where the olds tell us the cloud is just someone else's computer. a

"Ha ha good luck when the Internet is down. I've got everything safe here on this bad boy!" *pats Packard Bell 486*

I'm getting close to 63 years old, and my 'Packard Bell 486' is a Synology DS-1815+ NAS with 22 TB of disk space in a RAID-5 + Hot Spare.  I have it connected to my own Active Directory domain (2 DCs for redundancy) behind a hardware firewall appliance with DMZ capability.  Anytime I want a cloud, I will set up an exposed and protected way to access from the outside - and limit access to my own devices.

Sure, something can still go wrong.  But I won't have to worry about the host / vendor or other tenants screwing the pooch.  I'll be limited to my own mistakes, and I am comfortable owning up to them if/when I make them.  God knows, there have been times when I had to.

Point is, idiocy is not restricted to any age group.  There are geniuses and nincompoops in the Boomer set, and also in the Millennials.  That's life.

Oh...I see you didn't spring for the RP version on that synology.....you really like to play with fire, don't you?

I don't think that version was available when I bought.  When did it come out?  (Heck, I thought I was ordering an 1813+, and received the 1815.)

Redundant Power is *very* nice, and I've always said that the single power supply was the one thing I liked least about Synology.  But to go with the RP, I would have to either get the 815RP and add an expansion unit, or go for the 2416RP.  I somehow suspect that would have been a lot more expensive.

So, I stick with my 1815+ and have it running off of a nice big UPS, and in a year or two, I expect to add the whole-house generator, running off my natural gas line.  The one power supply in the NAS is definitely the weak point, but if I keep the incoming power as clean as possible, I can hope.

I can also get a couple of 10 TB drives in IcyDock chassis to plug into the NAS and back it up every so often.

It would make life so much easier if they would go to the really great stuff first, instead of waiting till I implement something, and then rolling out the advances.  ;-)

Thanks for the pointer.  I'll save that recommendation for next time I set one up.


Not sure when the RP option was offered for the DS series, but I've worked with them on the RS series for quite a few years now.  Very handy.

Just as a point of curiosity, what are you doing for backup on 22TB?  Synology is a great unit, but they are not without their issues.  I've seen a few where the entire filesystem ended up getting corrupted due to an error in a rebuild or a system update.  Not often, mind you, but enough to never use one without a proper backup in place.
 
2017-06-19 06:20:38 PM  
There is no cloud.  It's just someone else's virtual machine running in a vast lights out data center with redundant instances scattered across six continents...all right, fark it, it's a cloud.
 
2017-06-19 06:23:20 PM  

jake_lex: FormlessOne: Cubansaltyballs: That was a pointless "article." Should have just posted the "why move to us"  guides from Microsoft.

It's The Register, Fark's favorite anti-Microsoft site. Never mind that Microsoft actually does farking tell you all of this, if you RTFM, many of the "issues" they describe have nothing to do with Microsoft specifically - they generally affect the cloud. Even their own goddamned "article" notes that in a couple of places.

The Register wants to be the Daily Mail of the tech press.  They run trolly articles shiatting on every major computer company: Microsoft, Apple, Google, whoever.


Yeah, but it's the Microsoft ones that show up on Fark most often, followed not very closely by Apple.
 
2017-06-19 07:09:42 PM  

Driedsponge: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Driedsponge: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: jaytkay: Oh yay, this thread where the olds tell us the cloud is just someone else's computer. a

"Ha ha good luck when the Internet is down. I've got everything safe here on this bad boy!" *pats Packard Bell 486*

I'm getting close to 63 years old, and my 'Packard Bell 486' is a Synology DS-1815+ NAS with 22 TB of disk space in a RAID-5 + Hot Spare.  I have it connected to my own Active Directory domain (2 DCs for redundancy) behind a hardware firewall appliance with DMZ capability.  Anytime I want a cloud, I will set up an exposed and protected way to access from the outside - and limit access to my own devices.

Sure, something can still go wrong.  But I won't have to worry about the host / vendor or other tenants screwing the pooch.  I'll be limited to my own mistakes, and I am comfortable owning up to them if/when I make them.  God knows, there have been times when I had to.

Point is, idiocy is not restricted to any age group.  There are geniuses and nincompoops in the Boomer set, and also in the Millennials.  That's life.

Oh...I see you didn't spring for the RP version on that synology.....you really like to play with fire, don't you?

I don't think that version was available when I bought.  When did it come out?  (Heck, I thought I was ordering an 1813+, and received the 1815.)

Redundant Power is *very* nice, and I've always said that the single power supply was the one thing I liked least about Synology.  But to go with the RP, I would have to either get the 815RP and add an expansion unit, or go for the 2416RP.  I somehow suspect that would have been a lot more expensive.

So, I stick with my 1815+ and have it running off of a nice big UPS, and in a year or two, I expect to add the whole-house generator, running off my natural gas line.  The one power supply in the NAS is definitely the weak point, but if I keep the incoming power as clean as possible, I can hope.

I can also get a couple of 10 TB ...


What am I doing for backup on the NAS?  Well, *at the moment*, virtually all of the content is stuff that I can recreate without a huge amount of trouble.  That will change before too long, so I suppose I'll go with the IcyDock / external hard drive approach.  I've been using that system (along with Acronis Images of the C: drives) to back up my servers, and it's gone well.  Yeah, even at USB3 or eSATA speeds, backing up the big NAS will take time - a weekend, or a week.  Fortunately, the bulk of the data should be reasonably static.

I suppose I could invest in a second NAS as money frees up, but there are always *lots* of projects that need doing around the house.
 
2017-06-19 07:13:24 PM  

MrSteve007: As someone who had 3 simultaneous SAS drive failures in my hyper-v server (which includes our work's exchange server) at the co-location last Friday - I'm seriously contemplating moving our exchange services to Office 365. RAID 6 wasn't enough to keep us running.

Also, I found this to be quite interesting, as recently we've started hitting the 260 character limit on our network drives:

"With the arrival of NTFS we were allowed a glorious 260 characters in a full file path and we use it as much as we can today. Why? Because search sucks and a structure with detailed file names is our only hope of ever finding things again on-prem. Long file names (including long-named and deeply nested folders) will cause you grief with most cloud data migrations.

If you don't run into migration issues with this, just wait until you start syncing. We've seen it both with OneDrive and Google Drive and on Macs too. Re-educate your users and come up with a new, shorter naming standard. And watch out for Microsoft lifting the 260-character limitation in Windows 10 version 1607. Fortunately, it's opt-in."

Why should I "watch out" for that? It's awesome they're finally getting rid of that.


Probably because not all the infrastructure that the users are connecting to will support their longer filenames.

/but they should
 
2017-06-19 07:16:08 PM  

tlchwi02: that file name length issue is something that effects hyper-v too. see it a lot with CSPs who want to name their files 'customer_name_at_customer_location_at_customers_individual_last_name_​email_address_server_name_server_type_CSV_location_CSV's_uncles_second​_brothers_ex_roomates_snapchat_address' and then complain that they get an error anytime they try and move or manipulate it.


My boss (only for the next few days, thank jebus) insists that everybody has a c:\USER folder on each computer they use. And that each project gets its own subfolder. and each aspect of each project gets its own subfolder under that subfolder. etc. and that all files generated be fully descriptive of contents, and that each filename includes the user who generated it, and that the date be included in the file name. And then whenever it gets modified by anybody else, they generate a new file - the original filename remains, but they append THEIR name on it, and the date they modified it, and what they did. and of course he frequently lectures us about long file names that can't be backed up because the backup drives each have their own subfolders, that describe which computer, and which user, and which project...
Oh, and his new complaint is that  you should also never even NEED to transfer files, despite the fact that different computers are set up with different software (medical research). But if for some crazy reason you insist on transferring files, you should ONLY use lab-owned flash drives, never your own personal flash drive. And you need to copy the original file and paste it from the pc drive to the flash drive, and then CUT and paste from the flash drive to the other computer. Copying and pasting is not acceptable because you might forget to delete that temp version of the file, and then you might run into differences between versions in different locations...
And if you really want to piss him off, jump to a dos prompt and run comp.exe to check files and then just delete a version. He's the kind of guy that thinks adding a new harddrive requires a special meeting with a "trained" person from the IT department, so him trying to watch me use a command window is... interesting. (oh god oh god the computers' going to die).
 
2017-06-19 07:16:55 PM  

calbert: what what?


Came here to say that, so I'll instead do the callback.

In the butt.

img.fark.net
 
2017-06-19 07:19:01 PM  

ThatGuyOverThere: But if for some crazy reason you insist on transferring files, you should ONLY use lab-owned flash drives, never your own personal flash drive


In the middle of all the overwork in that story, this is actually a really good idea.  Flash drives of unknown provenance are a really good way to easily get malware into a protected network.
 
2017-06-19 07:38:21 PM  

TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: But if for some crazy reason you insist on transferring files, you should ONLY use lab-owned flash drives, never your own personal flash drive

In the middle of all the overwork in that story, this is actually a really good idea.  Flash drives of unknown provenance are a really good way to easily get malware into a protected network.


We all spend a lot of time working at home in the evenings and on weekends...
you have to ask special permission to use the lab-owned flash drives
 
2017-06-19 08:17:38 PM  
My company has been tossing more and more stuff in the cloud - sometimes Amazon, sometimes our own - and it has been nothing but trouble and broken SLAs.  The people who make decisions and configurations for it suck that much.
 
2017-06-19 08:22:45 PM  

ThatGuyOverThere: TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: But if for some crazy reason you insist on transferring files, you should ONLY use lab-owned flash drives, never your own personal flash drive

In the middle of all the overwork in that story, this is actually a really good idea.  Flash drives of unknown provenance are a really good way to easily get malware into a protected network.

We all spend a lot of time working at home in the evenings and on weekends...
you have to ask special permission to use the lab-owned flash drives


Flash drives are how Israeli and US intelligence got stuxnet into the Iranian nuclear project and fuqt up there centrifuges.

A secure place won't allow them at all. At a previous job, our systems would wipe any usb drive instantly. Once a month or so I'd get a call, "why isn't my iPod working?" Because you plugged it into your work computer like we told you not to and we bricked it, duh.
 
2017-06-19 08:26:14 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: jaytkay: Oh yay, this thread where the olds tell us the cloud is just someone else's computer. a

"Ha ha good luck when the Internet is down. I've got everything safe here on this bad boy!" *pats Packard Bell 486*

I'm getting close to 63 years old, and my 'Packard Bell 486' is a Synology DS-1815+ NAS with 22 TB of disk space in a RAID-5 + Hot Spare.  I have it connected to my own Active Directory domain (2 DCs for redundancy) behind a hardware firewall appliance with DMZ capability.  Anytime I want a cloud, I will set up an exposed and protected way to access from the outside - and limit access to my own devices.

Sure, something can still go wrong.  But I won't have to worry about the host / vendor or other tenants screwing the pooch.  I'll be limited to my own mistakes, and I am comfortable owning up to them if/when I make them.  God knows, there have been times when I had to.

Point is, idiocy is not restricted to any age group.  There are geniuses and nincompoops in the Boomer set, and also in the Millennials.  That's life.


What do you use the AD domain for?
 
2017-06-19 08:49:03 PM  

ThatGuyOverThere: TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: But if for some crazy reason you insist on transferring files, you should ONLY use lab-owned flash drives, never your own personal flash drive

In the middle of all the overwork in that story, this is actually a really good idea.  Flash drives of unknown provenance are a really good way to easily get malware into a protected network.

We all spend a lot of time working at home in the evenings and on weekends...
you have to ask special permission to use the lab-owned flash drives


Yeah, but you'd be doing a lot more work when everything ends up randomware encrypted and the disaster recovery plan that was last tested a couple years ago fails to bring everything back online.
 
2017-06-19 09:37:13 PM  

Shazam999: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: jaytkay: Oh yay, this thread where the olds tell us the cloud is just someone else's computer. a

"Ha ha good luck when the Internet is down. I've got everything safe here on this bad boy!" *pats Packard Bell 486*

I'm getting close to 63 years old, and my 'Packard Bell 486' is a Synology DS-1815+ NAS with 22 TB of disk space in a RAID-5 + Hot Spare.  I have it connected to my own Active Directory domain (2 DCs for redundancy) behind a hardware firewall appliance with DMZ capability.  Anytime I want a cloud, I will set up an exposed and protected way to access from the outside - and limit access to my own devices.

Sure, something can still go wrong.  But I won't have to worry about the host / vendor or other tenants screwing the pooch.  I'll be limited to my own mistakes, and I am comfortable owning up to them if/when I make them.  God knows, there have been times when I had to.

Point is, idiocy is not restricted to any age group.  There are geniuses and nincompoops in the Boomer set, and also in the Millennials.  That's life.

What do you use the AD domain for?


Well, I'm a Windows admin in my day job.  I use it at home for experimentation, research, and trying things out.

We also use it for central account authentication, file & print sharing, normal business-type stuff, but on a smaller scale.  There are four of us in the house, so we have the two domain controllers and another server that does printers, WSUS for patch management, and WDS for system baseline images and provisioning.

We have four main PC workstations, a number of laptops and tablets, internet-connected TV and Blu-Ray player, cell phones, etc.  And the NAS, which is (among other things) acting as a household media server.  Got .iso images of most of the DVDs and Blu-Ray disks up there (over 6 TB so far - still uploading), and I'm working on uploading all our music to it.

We also have an 'IsoLab' in the server room, running off the DMZ port on the firewall, where we can experiment while keeping things off the house's 'production' network.  There are a few Linux machines in there (Kubuntu 16.04 LTS), and we're starting to get into Raspberry Pi.

Just not enough hours in the day...
 
2017-06-19 09:49:07 PM  

TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: But if for some crazy reason you insist on transferring files, you should ONLY use lab-owned flash drives, never your own personal flash drive

In the middle of all the overwork in that story, this is actually a really good idea.  Flash drives of unknown provenance are a really good way to easily get malware into a protected network.

We all spend a lot of time working at home in the evenings and on weekends...
you have to ask special permission to use the lab-owned flash drives

Yeah, but you'd be doing a lot more work when everything ends up randomware encrypted and the disaster recovery plan that was last tested a couple years ago fails to bring everything back online.


quite possibly. but it would be just as likely to come from the university network (connection is required just to log on) as from a thumb drive.
And I'll ask the same question here as I did with my school librarians 25 years or so ago

I can't bring in my own media to use on your computers because that's bad... but I can take your media home and use it on my own computer and then bring it back to use on your computers - and that's okay?

you see where i'm going with this? because my old librarian couldn't.
 
2017-06-19 09:55:23 PM  

ThatGuyOverThere: TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: But if for some crazy reason you insist on transferring files, you should ONLY use lab-owned flash drives, never your own personal flash drive

In the middle of all the overwork in that story, this is actually a really good idea.  Flash drives of unknown provenance are a really good way to easily get malware into a protected network.

We all spend a lot of time working at home in the evenings and on weekends...
you have to ask special permission to use the lab-owned flash drives

Yeah, but you'd be doing a lot more work when everything ends up randomware encrypted and the disaster recovery plan that was last tested a couple years ago fails to bring everything back online.

quite possibly. but it would be just as likely to come from the university network (connection is required just to log on) as from a thumb drive.
And I'll ask the same question here as I did with my school librarians 25 years or so ago

I can't bring in my own media to use on your computers because that's bad... but I can take your media home and use it on my own computer and then bring it back to use on your computers - and that's okay?

you see where i'm going with this? because my old librarian couldn't.


Ah yes, the USB thumb drives that existed in 1990.

Well, the portable digital read-write storage that libraries were using in 1990.

Wait, neither of those things existed.
 
2017-06-19 10:03:12 PM  

TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: But if for some crazy reason you insist on transferring files, you should ONLY use lab-owned flash drives, never your own personal flash drive

In the middle of all the overwork in that story, this is actually a really good idea.  Flash drives of unknown provenance are a really good way to easily get malware into a protected network.

We all spend a lot of time working at home in the evenings and on weekends...
you have to ask special permission to use the lab-owned flash drives

Yeah, but you'd be doing a lot more work when everything ends up randomware encrypted and the disaster recovery plan that was last tested a couple years ago fails to bring everything back online.

quite possibly. but it would be just as likely to come from the university network (connection is required just to log on) as from a thumb drive.
And I'll ask the same question here as I did with my school librarians 25 years or so ago

I can't bring in my own media to use on your computers because that's bad... but I can take your media home and use it on my own computer and then bring it back to use on your computers - and that's okay?

you see where i'm going with this? because my old librarian couldn't.

Ah yes, the USB thumb drives that existed in 1990.

Well, the portable digital read-write storage that libraries were using in 1990.

Wait, neither of those things existed.


I would bet that most library's computers in 1990 had floppy drives.
 
2017-06-19 10:04:21 PM  

TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: Well, the portable digital read-write storage that libraries were using in 1990.


I take it you are 15 years old or so, correct?

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2017-06-19 10:07:59 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: ThatGuyOverThere: But if for some crazy reason you insist on transferring files, you should ONLY use lab-owned flash drives, never your own personal flash drive

In the middle of all the overwork in that story, this is actually a really good idea.  Flash drives of unknown provenance are a really good way to easily get malware into a protected network.

We all spend a lot of time working at home in the evenings and on weekends...
you have to ask special permission to use the lab-owned flash drives

Yeah, but you'd be doing a lot more work when everything ends up randomware encrypted and the disaster recovery plan that was last tested a couple years ago fails to bring everything back online.

quite possibly. but it would be just as likely to come from the university network (connection is required just to log on) as from a thumb drive.
And I'll ask the same question here as I did with my school librarians 25 years or so ago

I can't bring in my own media to use on your computers because that's bad... but I can take your media home and use it on my own computer and then bring it back to use on your computers - and that's okay?

you see where i'm going with this? because my old librarian couldn't.

Ah yes, the USB thumb drives that existed in 1990.

Well, the portable digital read-write storage that libraries were using in 1990.

Wait, neither of those things existed.

I would bet that most library's computers in 1990 had floppy drives.


precisely why i said "media" there and not "thumb drive"
some people...
 
2017-06-19 10:28:29 PM  

jaytkay: TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: Well, the portable digital read-write storage that libraries were using in 1990.

I take it you are 15 years old or so, correct?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 640x311]


Ah, my good old friend the floppy.  Well, you've got me there.

Nevertheless, it was another era.  Bring in a bad floppy in 1990 and you inconvenience a library.  Maybe someone else checks it out and you break their stand-alone PC at home.

In the modern day, you're still a fool for thinking its perfectly okay to allow random USB drives into a corporate network.  Hell, if I had my way, you wouldn't be able to use the company's "approved" drives either.  100% RDP using some sort of SSL VPN if you're not in the office.
 
2017-06-20 10:54:59 AM  

Cubansaltyballs: That was a pointless "article." Should have just posted the "why move to us"  guides from Microsoft.


I think we must have read different articles. This read kind of like a scare piece, designed to drive you towards 3rd party migration tools (a la BitTitan's MigrationWiz, which I think is actually a sub-set of their newer MSPComplete offering these days - I think they stopped selling stand-alone MigrationWiz licenses).
 
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