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(The Raw Story)   John Oliver mocks GOP's health bill for being more unpopular than Delaware: And 'Delaware sucks'   ( rawstory.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Republican Party, United States Senate, host John Oliver, Democratic Party, President Donald Trump, Donald Trump, telephone booth ad, United States  
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2267 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 19 Jun 2017 at 3:32 AM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-06-19 12:46:32 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-06-19 12:56:51 AM  
Parts of Delaware are quite nice, actually.  The bits that have "DuPont" stamped on them are quality.
 
2017-06-19 01:12:04 AM  
I don't rank Delaware at the bottom

/Minnesotan
 
2017-06-19 02:57:40 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-06-19 03:33:23 AM  

Meltro: I don't rank Delaware at the bottom

/Minnesotan


Moped range to the Jersey shore.  That's the concern area.
 
2017-06-19 03:34:50 AM  
His bit about the coal industry was masterful.

I often wonder why people still give a shiat about greedy sociopaths like Bob Murray and Don Blankenship even after killing some of their workers with their insistence on cutting corners just to save a quick buck.
 
2017-06-19 03:37:23 AM  
Not for corporations it doesn't.
 
2017-06-19 03:44:45 AM  
This was the part worth watching (Warning: It's about 20 minutes long but worth it.)

Coal: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
Youtube aw6RsUhw1Q8
 
2017-06-19 03:47:52 AM  

Mrtraveler01: His bit about the coal industry was masterful.

I often wonder why people still give a shiat about greedy sociopaths like Bob Murray and Don Blankenship even after killing some of their workers with their insistence on cutting corners just to save a quick buck.


It was all coal country had.  It was that, or nothing.  And it's nothing at the moment.  Productive, paying labor has been replaced by poverty, hopelessness, and Oxycontin in truckload quantities.  Appalachia is rotting in places and nobody can stop it.
 
2017-06-19 03:56:42 AM  

Cpl.D: Mrtraveler01: His bit about the coal industry was masterful.

I often wonder why people still give a shiat about greedy sociopaths like Bob Murray and Don Blankenship even after killing some of their workers with their insistence on cutting corners just to save a quick buck.

It was all coal country had.  It was that, or nothing.  And it's nothing at the moment.  Productive, paying labor has been replaced by poverty, hopelessness, and Oxycontin in truckload quantities.  Appalachia is rotting in places and nobody can stop it.


Well, one candidate had a plan to stop it, but it involved re-training plans and assistance... they instead voted for the candidate who promised fairy dust and magical jobs out of nothing
 
2017-06-19 03:58:46 AM  
We're better than New Jersey.
I realize that's not saying much.
 
2017-06-19 04:15:07 AM  

Gdiguy: Cpl.D: Mrtraveler01: His bit about the coal industry was masterful.

I often wonder why people still give a shiat about greedy sociopaths like Bob Murray and Don Blankenship even after killing some of their workers with their insistence on cutting corners just to save a quick buck.

It was all coal country had.  It was that, or nothing.  And it's nothing at the moment.  Productive, paying labor has been replaced by poverty, hopelessness, and Oxycontin in truckload quantities.  Appalachia is rotting in places and nobody can stop it.

Well, one candidate had a plan to stop it, but it involved re-training plans and assistance... they instead voted for the candidate who promised fairy dust and magical jobs out of nothing


She probably sent those plans via email too.
 
2017-06-19 04:19:52 AM  

Meltro: I don't rank Delaware at the bottom

/Minnesotan


But close.

/also Minnesotan, at least I was born and raised there
 
2017-06-19 04:22:06 AM  

themindiswatching: Gdiguy: Cpl.D: Mrtraveler01: His bit about the coal industry was masterful.

I often wonder why people still give a shiat about greedy sociopaths like Bob Murray and Don Blankenship even after killing some of their workers with their insistence on cutting corners just to save a quick buck.

It was all coal country had.  It was that, or nothing.  And it's nothing at the moment.  Productive, paying labor has been replaced by poverty, hopelessness, and Oxycontin in truckload quantities.  Appalachia is rotting in places and nobody can stop it.

Well, one candidate had a plan to stop it, but it involved re-training plans and assistance... they instead voted for the candidate who promised fairy dust and magical jobs out of nothing

She probably sent those plans via email too.


Well clearly they had no choice but to vote for Trump then.
 
2017-06-19 04:34:24 AM  

Cpl.D: Mrtraveler01: His bit about the coal industry was masterful.

I often wonder why people still give a shiat about greedy sociopaths like Bob Murray and Don Blankenship even after killing some of their workers with their insistence on cutting corners just to save a quick buck.

It was all coal country had.  It was that, or nothing.  And it's nothing at the moment.  Productive, paying labor has been replaced by poverty, hopelessness, and Oxycontin in truckload quantities.  Appalachia is rotting in places and nobody can stop it.


This is what you get when you refuse to evolve.
 
2017-06-19 04:38:41 AM  
But Delaware is where the Author's House was....

/I'm assured that nothing is obscure on FARK
 
2017-06-19 04:42:19 AM  

Archie Goodwin: Cpl.D: Mrtraveler01: His bit about the coal industry was masterful.

I often wonder why people still give a shiat about greedy sociopaths like Bob Murray and Don Blankenship even after killing some of their workers with their insistence on cutting corners just to save a quick buck.

It was all coal country had.  It was that, or nothing.  And it's nothing at the moment.  Productive, paying labor has been replaced by poverty, hopelessness, and Oxycontin in truckload quantities.  Appalachia is rotting in places and nobody can stop it.

This is what you get when you refuse to evolve.


To be fair, I don't think they had any choices to evolve to anything.
 
2017-06-19 04:50:15 AM  
Hey, I live in that remark!

/Delaware sucks like a black hole
//every time I leave, I get dragged back in
///third slash for good luck
 
2017-06-19 04:54:54 AM  

Cpl.D: To be fair, I don't think they had any choices to evolve to anything.


They could have [still can if they really want] gone back to school and retrained in something. Sure it might mean they have to move. The horror. It's not like this whole scenario hasn't been done before.

It comes down to pure stubborness, or pig-headedness, on their part. During the primaries there was an interview with one of the coal miners and he basically said that his grandfather and father were miner, he was a miner, till the mine closed [and he was waiting the day it reopened], and gosh darnit his son was NOT going to college and he WOULD be a miner too. That is their mentality.
 
2017-06-19 05:13:38 AM  
img.fark.net
...Just sayin'.
 
2017-06-19 05:33:13 AM  

Archie Goodwin: Cpl.D: To be fair, I don't think they had any choices to evolve to anything.

They could have [still can if they really want] gone back to school and retrained in something. Sure it might mean they have to move. The horror. It's not like this whole scenario hasn't been done before.

It comes down to pure stubborness, or pig-headedness, on their part. During the primaries there was an interview with one of the coal miners and he basically said that his grandfather and father were miner, he was a miner, till the mine closed [and he was waiting the day it reopened], and gosh darnit his son was NOT going to college and he WOULD be a miner too. That is their mentality.


I don't think you realize how bum poor much of Appalachia is.  Move?  With what money?  A lot of these folks worked hand-to-mouth, the literal working poor.  Yeah, some of 'em are stubborn, but a great big damn lot of them aren't, and had no choice in the god damn matter.

shiat, there are still enclaves up there that haven't seen the outside world in generations. Subsistence farmers, family units that don't have nor ever had electricity, those who were raised via home schooling using only the christian bible and texts books half a century out of date.  You will find people who never heard that man landed on the moon.  Time stopped in a lot of places in the darker corners up there.  There's still some blue people, though they keep out of sight out of social stigma.
 
2017-06-19 05:39:14 AM  

Cpl.D: Mrtraveler01: His bit about the coal industry was masterful.

I often wonder why people still give a shiat about greedy sociopaths like Bob Murray and Don Blankenship even after killing some of their workers with their insistence on cutting corners just to save a quick buck.

It was all coal country had.  It was that, or nothing.  And it's nothing at the moment.  Productive, paying labor has been replaced by poverty, hopelessness, and Oxycontin in truckload quantities.  Appalachia is rotting in places and nobody can stop it.


It was bound to happen; you know how those people are.  Some overdoses here and there, and things will sort themselves out.  If not, let's jack up the minimum mandatory sentencing.

/Just remembering what they taught me about the drug problem in the 80s
//Somehow, it's different this time
 
2017-06-19 05:39:33 AM  
Whole small towns are going to be destroyed by the destruction of these good paying jobs.

But, the same thing happened to Pittsburgh and Detroit. Why is it expected that sensitivity and political coddling has to happen when this sort of thing happens to small towns?

Not trying to be insensitive, we DO need to funnel resources into these coal mining towns to help them out.
 
2017-06-19 05:40:37 AM  

Archie Goodwin: Cpl.D: To be fair, I don't think they had any choices to evolve to anything.

They could have [still can if they really want] gone back to school and retrained in something. Sure it might mean they have to move. The horror. It's not like this whole scenario hasn't been done before.

It comes down to pure stubborness, or pig-headedness, on their part. During the primaries there was an interview with one of the coal miners and he basically said that his grandfather and father were miner, he was a miner, till the mine closed [and he was waiting the day it reopened], and gosh darnit his son was NOT going to college and he WOULD be a miner too. That is their mentality.


Evolve or die. They apparently made their choice.
 
2017-06-19 05:40:56 AM  
Delaware: three counties at low tide, two at high.
 
2017-06-19 05:42:43 AM  

Sammichless: Whole small towns are going to be destroyed by the destruction of these good paying jobs.

But, the same thing happened to Pittsburgh and Detroit. Why is it expected that sensitivity and political coddling has to happen when this sort of thing happens to small towns?

Not trying to be insensitive, we DO need to funnel resources into these coal mining towns to help them out.


If they can afford Obama Cadillacs and lobster phones, seems like they're doing OK to me.

/Just paraphrasing them
 
2017-06-19 05:57:00 AM  

Cpl.D: I don't think you realize how bum poor much of Appalachia is.  Move?  With what money?  A lot of these folks worked hand-to-mouth, the literal working poor.  Yeah, some of 'em are stubborn, but a great big damn lot of them aren't, and had no choice in the god damn matter.


The average pay for a coal miner is $23.04, the average rent in West Virginia is between $487 (average studio apt.) to $1014 (average 4 bedroom house).

Your depiction of coal miners money problems is poor.
 
2017-06-19 05:57:05 AM  

Cpl.D: Mrtraveler01: His bit about the coal industry was masterful.

I often wonder why people still give a shiat about greedy sociopaths like Bob Murray and Don Blankenship even after killing some of their workers with their insistence on cutting corners just to save a quick buck.

It was all coal country had.  It was that, or nothing.  And it's nothing at the moment.  Productive, paying labor has been replaced by poverty, hopelessness, and Oxycontin in truckload quantities.  Appalachia is rotting in places and nobody can stop it.


I'm amazed that for generations it was anything they could do to prevent their children and grandchildren to experience the same fate they did. They dreamed of a better life. And then at some point one or two generations just gave up. They clung to the shiat-ass jobs their ancestors fought to get away from. It doesn't make sense to me. People everywhere else fought to get educated, fought to improve their areas, improve their regions, fought for better representation, but these people turned into spiteful, hopeless people who batted hands away that might have helped them.

I've read some stuff on the Ulster Scots that these people are descended from. Somehow they got across the water, sure, and then got caught into really terrible jobs, yes, but then there was this inbuilt meanness and anger that made them incapable of actually improving themselves - which so many other immigrant groups did. I'm tired of being PC about this, or whatever. At some point you have to be at fault for refusing to help yourselves, refusing outside help, and voting in Republicans time and again. It's their hatred, their racism, their age-old political beliefs that is killing them. They made themselves victims. They had to have: the same people that had the wherewithal to make it from one country to the next, to get on ships and organize their families in that way, are now completely miserable.

I liken it to many populations of African-Americans, who came over in far, far worse circumstances. Yes, there are massive problems in many areas, but they are able to survive under far greater duress than these people are.
 
2017-06-19 06:11:51 AM  

Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: I'm amazed that for generations it was anything they could do to prevent their children and grandchildren to experience the same fate they did. They dreamed of a better life. And then at some point one or two generations just gave up. They clung to the shiat-ass jobs their ancestors fought to get away from. It doesn't make sense to me. People everywhere else fought to get educated, fought to improve their areas, improve their regions, fought for better representation, but these people turned into spiteful, hopeless people who batted hands away that might have helped them.


They act exactly like people who believe they are backed in to a corner and whom believe have no other options.  Like inner city ghettos, people love to get out when they can, but they'll dig in if they legitimately think they have zero prospects or options of anything different.  And to top it off, that life is all the Appalachian enclaves know.

Sammichless: Cpl.D: I don't think you realize how bum poor much of Appalachia is.  Move?  With what money?  A lot of these folks worked hand-to-mouth, the literal working poor.  Yeah, some of 'em are stubborn, but a great big damn lot of them aren't, and had no choice in the god damn matter.

The average pay for a coal miner is $23.04, the average rent in West Virginia is between $487 (average studio apt.) to $1014 (average 4 bedroom house).

Your depiction of coal miners money problems is poor.


And how much money are they making not doing those jobs currently?  That pay is great if someone's paying it.  The problem is a lot less places are paying it.  There's a reason the median household income in West Virginia for adults 25 and under is a piddling ~$20k.  It's because a whole god damn lot of people aren't getting that twenty three an hour.
 
2017-06-19 06:13:42 AM  
And as an aside I just wanna point out how profoundly stupid the premise is that these people are having hard times is because they weren't bootstrappy enough.  I laughed at Republicans for that kind of logic and I'll laugh at anyone else trying to use it also.
 
2017-06-19 06:14:26 AM  

Odin's Other Eye: Meltro: I don't rank Delaware at the bottom

/Minnesotan

But close.

/also Minnesotan, at least I was born and raised there


How Minnesotans are too nice to condemn Delaware is in the video, fyi.
The Playboy quote is worth a watch.
I'm going to start calling Oliver/Colbert audiences the grateful minority because so much of mainstream media has a legacy of demographics it maintains and engages in a shorthand of biases, but The Daily Show came out of the insanity of 9-11 and the poorly accounted dead and waste of the Iraqi invasion. The Comedians have had less to preserve and more to explore (finding an audience versus serving it).
 
2017-06-19 06:24:06 AM  
Ummm... Florida?
 
2017-06-19 06:28:27 AM  

Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: At some point you have to be at fault for refusing to help yourselves, refusing outside help, and voting in Republicans time and again. It's their hatred, their racism, their age-old political beliefs that is killing them. They made themselves victims.

Yeah, liberals can go only so far in trying to provide them with education, jobs, healthcare and legal protection.  You can lead a horse to water and all that.  Instead they voted for destruction.  And for what?  Racism.  Entitlements are for those people.  They whine about taxes they don't even pay, and want jobs that literally don't exist anymore.

And hey, if they want to eat their own shiat before being caught upwind within a whiff of diversity, well, I'm just numb to their self-defeating bigotry at this point.  But now it's, "If I can't have exactly what I want, which is for a high-paying job with no qualifications given to me by a rich man without dem big gummint getting in his way because of taxes, then the whole country can just burn."  Except they literally just voted against any hope that would even happen!  You hear what they really think and your jaw just hits the floor.

Some of the frustrations, I get.  Dems abandoned these places decades ago, allowing the Republicans to poison the culture to the point that their brains are tangled in self-contradicting nonsense.  They hear about programs and benefits they never see.  But ask them why they think the way they do, and it all boils down to hating them.  Not because of what they did or didn't do, but because of what they are.  The attempt was made to find these people and relate to them, but it turns out they're far more detestable than their worst stereotypes.
 
2017-06-19 06:32:52 AM  

Cpl.D: And as an aside I just wanna point out how profoundly stupid the premise is that these people are having hard times is because they weren't bootstrappy enough.  I laughed at Republicans for that kind of logic and I'll laugh at anyone else trying to use it also.


It's not a question of being insufficiently bootstrappy. It's a question of repeatedly voting down any and all attempts to provide them with government-supported retraining and government-sponsored investment in emerging industries.

Every election cycle, the Democrats offer Appalachia new jobs and new employers and better treatment options for the public health crises wracking rural communities. Each time, Appalachia chooses instead to vote for fantasists who promise it'll all go away if they just fight the liberal environmentalists and the crafty foreigners and the job-stealing immigrants hard enough, oh, and the best way to do that is to cut your boss's taxes and let him pollute your streams some more.

I'm very sympathetic to the fact that not all Americans enjoy the same opportunities for economic advancement. I am not particularly sympathetic to people who choose, over and over again, to reject all attempts to provide them with special new taxpayer-funded opportunities for economic advancement.
 
2017-06-19 06:34:08 AM  

pkjun: Cpl.D: And as an aside I just wanna point out how profoundly stupid the premise is that these people are having hard times is because they weren't bootstrappy enough.  I laughed at Republicans for that kind of logic and I'll laugh at anyone else trying to use it also.

It's not a question of being insufficiently bootstrappy. It's a question of repeatedly voting down any and all attempts to provide them with government-supported retraining and government-sponsored investment in emerging industries.

Every election cycle, the Democrats offer Appalachia new jobs and new employers and better treatment options for the public health crises wracking rural communities. Each time, Appalachia chooses instead to vote for fantasists who promise it'll all go away if they just fight the liberal environmentalists and the crafty foreigners and the job-stealing immigrants hard enough, oh, and the best way to do that is to cut your boss's taxes and let him pollute your streams some more.

I'm very sympathetic to the fact that not all Americans enjoy the same opportunities for economic advancement. I am not particularly sympathetic to people who choose, over and over again, to reject all attempts to provide them with special new taxpayer-funded opportunities for economic advancement.


I gotcha.  You're referring to them voting specifically for coal-promoting politicians versus ones offering other avenues of income.  I agree with you.
 
2017-06-19 06:37:46 AM  

dragonchild: Some of the frustrations, I get. Dems abandoned these places decades ago, allowing the Republicans to poison the culture to the point that their brains are tangled in self-contradicting nonsense. They hear about programs and benefits they never see. But ask them why they think the way they do, and it all boils down to hating them.


Which is why the Democrats "abandoned those places." The Democrats never made the conscious choice to tell Appalachia to fark off. They simply began supporting civil rights and economic fairness for minorities, as the Republicans began to lean into naked appeals to bigotry.

"The Democrats turned their back on the rural white voter" is simply untrue. The Democrats have never ended their New-Deal-era support for revitalizing and renewing rural communities. All that's happened is that those rural communities decided they'd rather lick the boots of a white man than stand on their feet next to a black man.
 
2017-06-19 06:40:07 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-06-19 06:52:23 AM  

bloobeary: We're better than New Jersey.
I realize that's not saying much.


Recent conversation with Mrs. Chompachangas
Me: I don't want to get stuck living in New Jersey
Mrs. Chompachangas: I have some bad news: We are stuck in New Jersey right now.
Me: :(

Applying for jobs in Vermont, lately.
 
2017-06-19 07:06:25 AM  

Cpl.D: Sammichless: Cpl.D: I don't think you realize how bum poor much of Appalachia is.  Move?  With what money?  A lot of these folks worked hand-to-mouth, the literal working poor.  Yeah, some of 'em are stubborn, but a great big damn lot of them aren't, and had no choice in the god damn matter.


shiat, there are still enclaves up there that haven't seen the outside world in generations. Subsistence farmers, family units that don't have nor ever had electricity, those who were raised via home schooling using only the christian bible and texts books half a century out of date.  You will find people who never heard that man landed on the moon.  Time stopped in a lot of places in the darker corners up there.  There's still some blue people, though they keep out of sight out of social stigma

The average pay for a coal miner is $23.04, the average rent in West Virginia is between $487 (average studio apt.) to $1014 (average 4 bedroom house).

Your depiction of coal miners money problems is poor.


And how much money are they making not doing those jobs currently?  That pay is great if someone's paying it.  The problem is a lot less places are paying it.  There's a reason the median household income in West Virginia for adults 25 and under is a piddling ~$20k.  It's because a whole god damn lot of people aren't getting that twenty three an hour.


Your post was answering someone who was talking about coal miners moving and retraining. A job that gets paid as high as $80k a year, and is located in many of the cheapest places to live in the US.

Your answer involved bringing up the "blue people" of Appalachia.

I'm just attempting to put you back on track. Coal miners and Appalachian people who are blue, or have no electricity are not the same people.

/But, yes, coal miners often live within a couple hundred miles of the Nation's poorest people. I guess.
 
2017-06-19 07:07:42 AM  

Sammichless: But, the same thing happened to Pittsburgh and Detroit. Why is it expected that sensitivity and political coddling has to happen when this sort of thing happens to small towns?


I went to Pittsburgh a couple of weeks ago. You know what I was able to do while I was there? Breathe. Pittsburgh is no longer the steel and coal town it used to be. In fact, the largest 3 employers in PGH are Medical (UPMC), Education (University of Pittsburgh) and Government (Federal).

It may be difficult, but it is not impossible to transition from coal, as other places have done it.
 
2017-06-19 07:14:13 AM  

Cpl.D: Archie Goodwin: Cpl.D: Mrtraveler01: His bit about the coal industry was masterful.

I often wonder why people still give a shiat about greedy sociopaths like Bob Murray and Don Blankenship even after killing some of their workers with their insistence on cutting corners just to save a quick buck.

It was all coal country had.  It was that, or nothing.  And it's nothing at the moment.  Productive, paying labor has been replaced by poverty, hopelessness, and Oxycontin in truckload quantities.  Appalachia is rotting in places and nobody can stop it.

This is what you get when you refuse to evolve.

To be fair, I don't think they had any choices to evolve to anything.


Oh they did, they just chose not to do so.  So many of those colleges along the Appalachian Range, 2 and 4 year alike, received tons of funding from the state and feds to make it cheap to get an education or learn a trade.  Two of my brothers used it, and so did my folks, and they build their lives with it.  As for the rest, you know what they did with it?  fark all.  And why?  Because books are bad, except for that one that the preacher tells them about as he fleeces them weekly and then some.

They didn't want to do the heavy lifting it takes to get an education/trade.  And so now they want a handout.  Bullshiat.  My taxes (and yours) go to pay for their immoral lifestyle.  They bathe in willful ignorance, and blame everybody but themselves.  They elected a man who was just as broken and twisted as themselves. And they get off on it.  No more sympathy for them.
 
2017-06-19 07:15:58 AM  

pkjun: dragonchild: Some of the frustrations, I get. Dems abandoned these places decades ago, allowing the Republicans to poison the culture to the point that their brains are tangled in self-contradicting nonsense. They hear about programs and benefits they never see. But ask them why they think the way they do, and it all boils down to hating them.

Which is why the Democrats "abandoned those places." The Democrats never made the conscious choice to tell Appalachia to fark off. They simply began supporting civil rights and economic fairness for minorities, as the Republicans began to lean into naked appeals to bigotry.

"The Democrats turned their back on the rural white voter" is simply untrue. The Democrats have never ended their New-Deal-era support for revitalizing and renewing rural communities. All that's happened is that those rural communities decided they'd rather lick the boots of a white man than stand on their feet next to a black man.


You sound like you've been reading up on LBJ.  That's my experience as well.
 
2017-06-19 07:19:51 AM  

Cpl.D: Archie Goodwin: Cpl.D: Mrtraveler01: His bit about the coal industry was masterful.

I often wonder why people still give a shiat about greedy sociopaths like Bob Murray and Don Blankenship even after killing some of their workers with their insistence on cutting corners just to save a quick buck.

It was all coal country had.  It was that, or nothing.  And it's nothing at the moment.  Productive, paying labor has been replaced by poverty, hopelessness, and Oxycontin in truckload quantities.  Appalachia is rotting in places and nobody can stop it.

This is what you get when you refuse to evolve.

To be fair, I don't think they had any choices to evolve to anything.


Most of the population of the United States are is decended from people who took at look around themselves and figured it was time to get the fark out of Dodge, literally in the case of quite a few people on the West Coast these days.

If you're in the mines and have experience working with heavy machinery, working in confined spaces, working with explosives and other hazardous chemicals, and working in mineral extraction... those are transferable skills that are in demand around the country. You will probably need to move to the jobs, but sometimes life sucks a but like that.

Ditto for a lot of people in support industries - specialized heavy equipment maintenance, hazmat disposal, heavy trucking, etc etc. All transferable skills.
 
2017-06-19 07:24:39 AM  

dustman81: Sammichless: But, the same thing happened to Pittsburgh and Detroit. Why is it expected that sensitivity and political coddling has to happen when this sort of thing happens to small towns?

I went to Pittsburgh a couple of weeks ago. You know what I was able to do while I was there? Breathe. Pittsburgh is no longer the steel and coal town it used to be. In fact, the largest 3 employers in PGH are Medical (UPMC), Education (University of Pittsburgh) and Government (Federal).

It may be difficult, but it is not impossible to transition from coal, as other places have done it.


I agree.

Pittsburgh has shrunk a bit, and it is poorer than it once was, but it has done a great job at attracting new industry and re-training it's steel workers. I the post you are quoting, I mentioned that we need to funnel resources into these small coal mining towns. I was suggesting that we owe it to these small towns to try to keep them alive when the mines go under. Pittsburgh should be used as an example. The small towns are still likely to hurt though, and some efforts will work better than others (Pittsburgh will live on, Detroit may or may not.)
 
2017-06-19 07:30:10 AM  

Sammichless: dustman81: Sammichless: But, the same thing happened to Pittsburgh and Detroit. Why is it expected that sensitivity and political coddling has to happen when this sort of thing happens to small towns?

I went to Pittsburgh a couple of weeks ago. You know what I was able to do while I was there? Breathe. Pittsburgh is no longer the steel and coal town it used to be. In fact, the largest 3 employers in PGH are Medical (UPMC), Education (University of Pittsburgh) and Government (Federal).

It may be difficult, but it is not impossible to transition from coal, as other places have done it.

I agree.

Pittsburgh has shrunk a bit, and it is poorer than it once was, but it has done a great job at attracting new industry and re-training it's steel workers. I the post you are quoting, I mentioned that we need to funnel resources into these small coal mining towns. I was suggesting that we owe it to these small towns to try to keep them alive when the mines go under. Pittsburgh should be used as an example. The small towns are still likely to hurt though, and some efforts will work better than others (Pittsburgh will live on, Detroit may or may not.)


Why? What good does it do to keep those small towns alive? If we're going to insist on not taxing the wealthy, we need our limited resources to be more efficient. If anything, we should be moving those people to cities, so they can be exposed to the rest of society and allowed to see real chances of success rather than the nebulous chances they hear about and don't see.
 
2017-06-19 07:31:23 AM  

Shakin_Haitian: Sammichless: dustman81: Sammichless: But, the same thing happened to Pittsburgh and Detroit. Why is it expected that sensitivity and political coddling has to happen when this sort of thing happens to small towns?

I went to Pittsburgh a couple of weeks ago. You know what I was able to do while I was there? Breathe. Pittsburgh is no longer the steel and coal town it used to be. In fact, the largest 3 employers in PGH are Medical (UPMC), Education (University of Pittsburgh) and Government (Federal).

It may be difficult, but it is not impossible to transition from coal, as other places have done it.

I agree.

Pittsburgh has shrunk a bit, and it is poorer than it once was, but it has done a great job at attracting new industry and re-training it's steel workers. I the post you are quoting, I mentioned that we need to funnel resources into these small coal mining towns. I was suggesting that we owe it to these small towns to try to keep them alive when the mines go under. Pittsburgh should be used as an example. The small towns are still likely to hurt though, and some efforts will work better than others (Pittsburgh will live on, Detroit may or may not.)

Why? What good does it do to keep those small towns alive? If we're going to insist on not taxing the wealthy, we need our limited resources to be more efficient. If anything, we should be moving those people to cities, so they can be exposed to the rest of society and allowed to see real chances of success rather than the nebulous chances they hear about and don't see.


There's a thought.  Adopt the Japan model, have a continuous migration from the suburbs and remote communities to the super dense cities.  That would open even more land for agriculture, and the density would help tamp down population growth.
 
2017-06-19 07:37:46 AM  

Sammichless: Whole small towns are going to be destroyed by the destruction of these good paying jobs.

But, the same thing happened to Pittsburgh and Detroit. Why is it expected that sensitivity and political coddling has to happen when this sort of thing happens to small towns?


because small town voters count as more votes.
 
2017-06-19 07:41:46 AM  
Wait, I thought Duke sucked.
 
2017-06-19 07:42:53 AM  
I haven't had a chance to watch this episode yet.  It's on deck.

I just came in to say that everyone in the country should be watching these segments.  It's some of the best investigative reporting being done.  Or, ever, really.

Yes, it's humorous.  But it's also very informative.

The segment on the Paris Climate Change thing was among the best ever.  I wish more Trumps supporters would watch that and actually learn why it was a stupid, horrible mistake, for Trump to pull us out of that deal.  It would just be ONE step to get them on the road to understanding why our President is bad for this country, and indeed, the entire world.
 
2017-06-19 07:46:43 AM  
img.fark.net/
/it's the screen door factory or nothing if you go for a visit
 
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