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(Bloomberg)   President Trump orders the government to stop work on Y2K bug because it's still not going to happen 17 years after the fact   ( bloomberg.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Congressional Review Act, President of the United States, Director Mick Mulvaney, 2000, paperwork requirements, Year 2000 problem, OMB senior adviser, White House  
•       •       •

2963 clicks; posted to Politics » on 16 Jun 2017 at 2:52 PM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-06-16 11:07:50 AM  
Now we can start working on the year 2038 problem.
 
2017-06-16 11:37:08 AM  
...and the year 2,147,483,647 problem.
 
2017-06-16 11:46:01 AM  
Well, the Y2K thing makes sense, but:

the Pentagon will be freed from a requirement that it file a report every time a small business vendor is paid, a task that consumed some 1,200 man-hours every year.

This doesn't make sense. That's less than one full time job, to evaluate compliance with the (Bush-era?) small business rules for DoD contracting.
 
2017-06-16 12:02:32 PM  
Donald Trump:  I reduced government waste by about $30,000

Draining the Swamp!
 
2017-06-16 12:23:54 PM  

dv-ous: Well, the Y2K thing makes sense, but:

the Pentagon will be freed from a requirement that it file a report every time a small business vendor is paid, a task that consumed some 1,200 man-hours every year.

This doesn't make sense. That's less than one full time job, to evaluate compliance with the (Bush-era?) small business rules for DoD contracting.


You just answered your question.

Rules compliance.
 
2017-06-16 01:31:38 PM  

GardenWeasel: dv-ous: Well, the Y2K thing makes sense, but:

the Pentagon will be freed from a requirement that it file a report every time a small business vendor is paid, a task that consumed some 1,200 man-hours every year.

This doesn't make sense. That's less than one full time job, to evaluate compliance with the (Bush-era?) small business rules for DoD contracting.

You just answered your question.

Rules compliance.


Oh, yeah... goddamit.
 
2017-06-16 01:33:11 PM  
IS ANYONE WORKING ON THE Y3K BUG?????
 
2017-06-16 01:43:17 PM  
I'm surprised, given the number of Y2K con men consultants I met back in the day.
 
2017-06-16 02:56:37 PM  
My boss vetoed my planned new years eve skiing trip so that I could be close to the office in case our systems went down.  I even had to have someone on site to notify us if anything went down.  I was already pretty drunk when I got the e-mail that everything was fine.  I passed out about ten minutes later.

/stilled pissed off about that to this day
 
2017-06-16 02:57:48 PM  
FTA:
The agency didn't provide an estimate of how much time is currently spent on Y2K paperwork, but Linda Springer, an OMB senior adviser, acknowledged that it isn't a lot since those requirements are already often ignored in practice.

#MissionAccomplished
 
2017-06-16 02:57:51 PM  
Possibly his first good act as president.
 
2017-06-16 02:58:40 PM  
Sounds like welfare queen kinda shiat.


I bet the truth is closer to systems that are 30 or 40 years old that still need support.
 
2017-06-16 02:59:20 PM  
FOOLS! It was just waiting for us to let our guard down!
 
2017-06-16 02:59:38 PM  
What about the Y2.01705479k bug?
img.fark.net
 
2017-06-16 02:59:56 PM  

Petit_Merdeux: ...and the year 2,147,483,647 problem.


img.fark.net
On the case.
 
2017-06-16 03:04:01 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-06-16 03:07:12 PM  

urger: Now we can start working on the year 2038 problem.


Y2.038K has a chance of being worse than Y2K could've been.  Y2K just affected textual date parsing, and most of the associated glitches were minor.

Y2.038K bugs easily lead to programs locking up, in contrast.  Constructs like wait loops easily blow up if coded incorrectly for time_t wrapping around.
 
2017-06-16 03:08:09 PM  
Most of that shiat is probably COBOL anyway so it was never really Y2K compliant in the first place.

// Yeah, I've done lots of COBOL.
// Many years ago.
 
2017-06-16 03:10:03 PM  
I'm sure this was about the business reporting rules, but still...

This reminds me of a story about government from a tv show I used to watch:

Someone once asked why a palace guard always stood in an odd spot in a courtyard, and no one seemed to know the answer.  Turns out, over a hundred years earlier a princess spotted the first flower of spring in the courtyard and asked a guard to stand by it to keep it safe from being trampled.  The little princess never rescinded the order to guard the flower, and so for over a hundred years a guard has diligently stood at that same spot -- long after the flower, the princess, and even the memory of the reason for the guard being posted had long passed -- except perhaps for an old sage who wouldn't dare bother the emperor about it for fear of embarrassing him from the foolishness of it.    So, the guard still stands and will continue to until someone finally rescinds the order.

This is how government works.   People write laws and regulations and rarely re-evaluate them.  It'd be great if someone actually went through all the laws on all the books and chose which ones to vote to strike... you see posts all the time about crazy laws that are still on the books in each state.  No one takes them seriously b/c people haven't been prosecuted under them in ages, but that doesn't mean they can't be.
 
2017-06-16 03:11:06 PM  
In the government's defense?  They still have a lot of old shiat scattered throughout the country that's still in use or might be brought into use.
 
2017-06-16 03:12:33 PM  
"Many agencies have forgotten how to deregulate," he said. "It's been so long since somebody asked them to look backwards."

img.fark.net
 
2017-06-16 03:13:47 PM  

Headso: Possibly his first good act as president.


Donald Trump became the President with this act
 
2017-06-16 03:15:51 PM  
What about the people whose job was to write those reports? Won't anyone think of their families?
 
2017-06-16 03:17:11 PM  

netizencain: Donald Trump:  I reduced government waste by about $30,000

Draining the Swamp!


Technically that's just for one,

Seven of the more than 50 paperwork requirements the White House eliminated on Thursday dealt with the Y2K bug, according to a memo OMB released. Officials at the agency estimate the changes could save tens of thousands of man-hours across the federal government.

So its more like...300k.   Which is much yuger.
 
2017-06-16 03:18:04 PM  

gingerjet: /stilled pissed


Obviously.
 
2017-06-16 03:20:01 PM  

Marbleisheavy: Petit_Merdeux: ...and the year 2,147,483,647 problem.

[img.fark.net image 425x239]
On the case.


img.fark.net
 
2017-06-16 03:20:08 PM  

Headso: Possibly his first good act as president.


Now, if he just does that 100 more times,  he'll have saved us enough money to find a single one of his unnecessary trips to maralago.
 
2017-06-16 03:21:37 PM  

Satanic_Hamster: In the government's defense?  They still have a lot of old shiat scattered throughout the country that's still in use or might be brought into use.


You think they are going to start firing up computer equipment that hasn't been used in over 17 years?
 
2017-06-16 03:21:54 PM  

Necronic: netizencain: Donald Trump:  I reduced government waste by about $30,000

Draining the Swamp!

Technically that's just for one,

Seven of the more than 50 paperwork requirements the White House eliminated on Thursday dealt with the Y2K bug, according to a memo OMB released. Officials at the agency estimate the changes could save tens of thousands of man-hours across the federal government.

So its more like...300k.   Which is much yuger.


Lawyer billable hours math detected.
 
2017-06-16 03:23:49 PM  

Callous: Satanic_Hamster: In the government's defense?  They still have a lot of old shiat scattered throughout the country that's still in use or might be brought into use.

You think they are going to start firing up computer equipment that hasn't been used in over 17 years?


Got to make sure the Windows ME terminals still work
 
2017-06-16 03:24:24 PM  

Callous: Satanic_Hamster: In the government's defense?  They still have a lot of old shiat scattered throughout the country that's still in use or might be brought into use.

You think they are going to start firing up computer equipment that hasn't been used in over 17 years?


Wouldn't surprise me, when it comes to things like military, emergency management, transportation systems, things that are intended to run for a long time without downtime for maintenance.
 
2017-06-16 03:26:57 PM  

The5thElement: What about the people whose job was to write those reports? Won't anyone think of their families?


They can become coal miners.
 
2017-06-16 03:27:05 PM  

urger: Now we can start working on the year 2038 problem.


Don't worry, John Titor will save us.

Once his US civil war and nuclear holocaust survivalist wish fulfillment fantasy is done.
 
2017-06-16 03:28:01 PM  
Well, that's it now I'm seriously on the...

Okay, nevermind. This actually kind of makes sense.
 
2017-06-16 03:31:20 PM  
Federal workers still report on preparedness for year 2000

This is so (unfortunately) descriptive of some of my interactions with the federal workforce.
 
2017-06-16 03:32:17 PM  

Myria: urger: Now we can start working on the year 2038 problem.

Y2.038K has a chance of being worse than Y2K could've been.  Y2K just affected textual date parsing, and most of the associated glitches were minor.

Y2.038K bugs easily lead to programs locking up, in contrast.  Constructs like wait loops easily blow up if coded incorrectly for time_t wrapping around.


time_t is usually a signed integer type. Signed integer overflow invokes the dreaded undefined behavior.
 
2017-06-16 03:32:18 PM  
FTFA:

"As another example, the Pentagon will be freed from a requirement that it file a report every time a small business vendor is paid..."

That rule was put into place because the Pentagon was notorious about being late paying small business contractors. This is Donnie wanting to stiff contractors, nothing more.

They'll likely do away with the one that requires the prime contractor to report payment to small business subcontractors on federal projects as well, because stiffing the subcontractors is a time honored American tradition that Trump is particularly fond of.
 
2017-06-16 03:32:27 PM  

The5thElement: What about the people whose job was to write those reports? Won't anyone think of their families?


I'm sure they'll find something else.img.fark.net
 
2017-06-16 03:35:36 PM  

KingRamze: This is how government works.


That's how everyone works. Once you've settled into your accustomed routine, it's hard to break out of it. Have you ever seen how older people use computers? They type favoritesite.com into google and click the first link to get there instead of just using a bookmark or typing favoritesite.com into the address bar. They do this because that's the first way they learned how to find it, so they always repeat that exact action.

And it's not just humans that do this. Dogs, pigeons, wasps -- all sorts of animals have fixed action patterns because they remember getting good results the first time they did it. They never find ways to optimize, improve or even replace their actions when they discover a better way.

A lot of policies and procedures and company platforms are followed by employees "just cuz". They don't reason out why they do them, they just do them because policy dictates it.
 
2017-06-16 03:39:25 PM  

gingerjet: My boss vetoed my planned new years eve skiing trip so that I could be close to the office in case our systems went down.  I even had to have someone on site to notify us if anything went down.  I was already pretty drunk when I got the e-mail that everything was fine.  I passed out about ten minutes later.

/stilled pissed off about that to this day


I sympathize.  I was working in a tech support department and was low man on the totem pole.  I was required to spend the night in the office in case of problems.  I had one call at 2:30 am because some jackass had flipped their power supply on and off a few dozen times until the server failed, but that was it.

Partying like it's 1999 indeed.
 
2017-06-16 03:39:47 PM  

shroom: Callous: Satanic_Hamster: In the government's defense?  They still have a lot of old shiat scattered throughout the country that's still in use or might be brought into use.

You think they are going to start firing up computer equipment that hasn't been used in over 17 years?

Wouldn't surprise me, when it comes to things like military, emergency management, transportation systems, things that are intended to run for a long time without downtime for maintenance.


But what about disruption?  Iterative development?  Ping pong tables at work and hammocks?!??!  These are modern times!  Nothing lasts 17 years.
 
2017-06-16 03:44:03 PM  

Headso: Possibly his first good act as president.


And it's not all good.
 
2017-06-16 03:44:41 PM  

Walker: IS ANYONE WORKING ON THE Y3K BUG?????


Bah! that's nothing.
The Y10K on teh other hand will be something, because it will add an extra digit to the year field. It It will be the end of the (IT) world as we know it...
 
2017-06-16 03:47:26 PM  

The Googles Do Nothing: But what about disruption? Iterative development? Ping pong tables at work and hammocks?!??! These are modern times! Nothing lasts 17 years.


This lightbulb has been burning for over 100 years.

There is an awful lot of old government shiat -- relay stations, power terminals, hydro plants -- that are made to run indefinitely.
 
2017-06-16 03:48:16 PM  
fark you, html.

img.fark.net
 
2017-06-16 03:56:05 PM  

Callous: Satanic_Hamster: In the government's defense?  They still have a lot of old shiat scattered throughout the country that's still in use or might be brought into use.

You think they are going to start firing up computer equipment that hasn't been used in over 17 years?


Old hardware isn't susceptible to modern vulnerabilities, so if something compromises modern systems they like having old widgets around just in case.
 
2017-06-16 03:56:25 PM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: Federal workers still report on preparedness for year 2000

This is so (unfortunately) descriptive of some of my interactions with the federal workforce.


That's got to be a pretty easy report to do, though.
 
2017-06-16 03:57:39 PM  

KingRamze: I'm sure this was about the business reporting rules, but still...

This reminds me of a story about government from a tv show I used to watch:

Someone once asked why a palace guard always stood in an odd spot in a courtyard, and no one seemed to know the answer.  Turns out, over a hundred years earlier a princess spotted the first flower of spring in the courtyard and asked a guard to stand by it to keep it safe from being trampled.  The little princess never rescinded the order to guard the flower, and so for over a hundred years a guard has diligently stood at that same spot -- long after the flower, the princess, and even the memory of the reason for the guard being posted had long passed -- except perhaps for an old sage who wouldn't dare bother the emperor about it for fear of embarrassing him from the foolishness of it.    So, the guard still stands and will continue to until someone finally rescinds the order.


My shoes are too tight, but it doesn't matter, because I have forgotten how to dance.
 
2017-06-16 03:59:06 PM  

Ishkur: KingRamze: This is how government works.

That's how everyone works. Once you've settled into your accustomed routine, it's hard to break out of it. Have you ever seen how older people use computers? They type favoritesite.com into google and click the first link to get there instead of just using a bookmark or typing favoritesite.com into the address bar. They do this because that's the first way they learned how to find it, so they always repeat that exact action.

And it's not just humans that do this. Dogs, pigeons, wasps -- all sorts of animals have fixed action patterns because they remember getting good results the first time they did it. They never find ways to optimize, improve or even replace their actions when they discover a better way.

A lot of policies and procedures and company platforms are followed by employees "just cuz". They don't reason out why they do them, they just do them because policy dictates it.


And because they get a lot of push back if they ask why they don't do it a different way that works better.  You run into a lot of that problem in particular in structured environments.
 
2017-06-16 03:59:19 PM  

Petit_Merdeux: ...and the year 2,147,483,647 problem.


Trump will sign anything. Including integers.
 
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