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(Herald Tribune (SW Florida))   10-foot alligator proves they make great speed bumps, for motorcycles at least. Florida Alligator Trifecta complete   ( heraldtribune.com) divider line
    More: Florida, Injury, 10-foot alligator, alligator trapper, Tampa early Friday, 27-year-old Calun Nelson, Florida, Florida Highway Patrol, rural Florida road  
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3057 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 May 2017 at 7:40 PM (29 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



28 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-05-19 05:05:10 PM  
Someone should give that gator aid.
 
2017-05-19 07:43:51 PM  
Tri means three.

Perhaps I'm an idiot, but I've only seen two gator stories today....
 
2017-05-19 07:45:35 PM  
Typically gators don't move very fast so it's unlikely it darted out in front of him. If I had to guess, I'm going to go ahead and assume he was going way to fast.
 
2017-05-19 07:45:39 PM  
Why did the alligator cross the road? To become a new pair of alligator-hide boots when it got run over by a motorcycle.
 
2017-05-19 07:53:21 PM  
At least he can get some new boots now.
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-05-19 07:59:08 PM  
What a croc...
 
2017-05-19 08:05:38 PM  
Considering their ancestors used to hunt dinosaurs.

i.dailymail.co.ukView Full Size

(Although, to be fair, I think this may be a romantic interpretation of said crocodiles).
 
2017-05-19 08:08:20 PM  
WIMAUMA

Why, mama?
 
2017-05-19 08:09:40 PM  

uncleacid: Someone should give that gator aid.


*snort*

abhorrent1: Typically gators don't move very fast so it's unlikely it darted out in front of him. If I had to guess, I'm going to go ahead and assume he was going way to fast.


Or just not paying attention, or just riding a sheitty bike (now I'm curious).
Interesting damage to the critter, I'm wondering if he was already on the brakes.
(possibly what make him crash, sometimes throttle will help)

I've killed a deer on a freeway off ramp at 70mph at night, but didn't crash. The resulting tank slapper was almost impossible to control before the 270 degree turn, but I made it somehow. I also almost sheit myself and my knees were so shaky when I managed to stop, I could hardly stand. Come to think of it, the only reason I didn't sheit myself was my ass was to busy holding on to the seat!
Not funny...
 
2017-05-19 08:10:00 PM  
Surprised it wasn't hit by a Chevrolet movie theater...
 
2017-05-19 08:11:21 PM  
does his insurance call this a act of god?
 
2017-05-19 08:14:35 PM  
I know a fellow (An actual rocket scientist) who totaled his BMW Z3 by running over an alligator in Florida. Gators are fun speed bumps that appear in the middle of high speed roads regularly down there.

He bought another Z3 after the accident and moved to New Jersey. No gator collisions since then, but he has to live in NJ so it's probably not a net win. At least his new Z3 is pristine. He probably pays more to insure it in gator-free NJ though. NJ is kind of awful.
 
2017-05-19 08:18:49 PM  

abhorrent1: Typically gators don't move very fast so it's unlikely it darted out in front of him. If I had to guess, I'm going to go ahead and assume he was going way to fast.


It's not that, he doesn't understand how to deal with obstacles like that.  He was going slowly enough he tried to avoid it....that was his mistake.

"The Florida Highway Patrol said in a news release that 27-year-old Calun Nelson was riding his motorcycle south of Tampa early Friday when he saw the more than 10-foot alligator crossing the road in front of him. He tried to avoid the gator, but couldn't."

That was his mistake, he shouldn't have tried to avoid it.  If instead he were hit it straight on while  shifting his weight back he would have been fine.

Every rider should take a riding safety course even if their state doesn't require it.  Dealing with obstacles like that isn't a big deal at all if the person is trained properly.
 
2017-05-19 08:29:45 PM  

That Guy...From That Show!: abhorrent1: Typically gators don't move very fast so it's unlikely it darted out in front of him. If I had to guess, I'm going to go ahead and assume he was going way to fast.

It's not that, he doesn't understand how to deal with obstacles like that.  He was going slowly enough he tried to avoid it....that was his mistake.

"The Florida Highway Patrol said in a news release that 27-year-old Calun Nelson was riding his motorcycle south of Tampa early Friday when he saw the more than 10-foot alligator crossing the road in front of him. He tried to avoid the gator, but couldn't."

That was his mistake, he shouldn't have tried to avoid it.  If instead he were hit it straight on while  shifting his weight back he would have been fine.

Every rider should take a riding safety course even if their state doesn't require it.  Dealing with obstacles like that isn't a big deal at all if the person is trained properly.


I did take one when I got my license and that was what made me think he was outrunning his headlight.
It appears dark in the picture.
 
2017-05-19 08:41:41 PM  

baronbloodbath: Tri means three.

Perhaps I'm an idiot, but I've only seen two gator stories today....


Here's the third
 
2017-05-19 08:43:13 PM  
That poor Gator.
 
2017-05-19 09:20:43 PM  

baronbloodbath: Tri means three.

Perhaps I'm an idiot, but I've only seen two gator stories today....


Funny how the second story didn't get greenlit by the Admins, but the third did without modifying the headline.

Said second story:  http://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20170518/car-flips-after-hitting-al​l​igator-on-i-75-in-sarasota-county
 
2017-05-19 11:32:52 PM  
That gator doesn't look ancient to me...maybe 15-20 years old.

They only grow half a foot or so a year.
 
2017-05-20 12:02:36 AM  
In Florida, it's 'gators. In Iowa, it's deer.

A former co-worker of my son hit a deer at 60 mph on 63rd Street near Brown's Woods in Des Moines a few years back. The impact cut the deer in two and threw my son's co-worker over the handlebars. Unfortunately, this we just before a bridge. The guy hit the concrete curbing at the start of the bridge right at the base of his skull, just below the helmet. Impact snapped his neck, killing him instantly.
 
2017-05-20 02:16:12 AM  
I was watching a video of this last night. I've never seen a knocked out gator before.
 
2017-05-20 02:54:47 AM  
If that's a 10 foot gator, then those are unusually narrow lanes for a freeway.  12 foot minimums are standard with ~13 feet being typical, though with newer California (since the 1990s when lane splitting took off and probably certainly going forward after 2016 when California formally codified the practice) freeways getting 15 foot lanes.  For comparison, a bicycle lane is typically 6 or 7 feet wide, a parking space is typically 7 feet wide and a residential  collector has lanes typically 10 feet wide.
 
2017-05-20 04:01:04 AM  
 
2017-05-20 06:49:20 AM  

Baloo Uriza: If that's a 10 foot gator, then those are unusually narrow lanes for a freeway.  12 foot minimums are standard with ~13 feet being typical, though with newer California (since the 1990s when lane splitting took off and probably certainly going forward after 2016 when California formally codified the practice) freeways getting 15 foot lanes.  For comparison, a bicycle lane is typically 6 or 7 feet wide, a parking space is typically 7 feet wide and a residential  collector has lanes typically 10 feet wide.


It didn't happen on a freeway, the gator was hit on a state road.

This article is a little better.
 
2017-05-20 07:32:15 AM  

Spaceballer: Baloo Uriza: If that's a 10 foot gator, then those are unusually narrow lanes for a freeway.  12 foot minimums are standard with ~13 feet being typical, though with newer California (since the 1990s when lane splitting took off and probably certainly going forward after 2016 when California formally codified the practice) freeways getting 15 foot lanes.  For comparison, a bicycle lane is typically 6 or 7 feet wide, a parking space is typically 7 feet wide and a residential  collector has lanes typically 10 feet wide.

It didn't happen on a freeway, the gator was hit on a state road.

This article is a little better.


Doh.  Now I see the yellow centerline.  That said, state roads can be freeways, too.  Beaverton-Tigard Freeway, the Arroyo Seco Parkway, Bennett Causeway and the Broken Arrow Expressway are all examples of state roads as freeways.  Amusingly, Arroyo Seco being built was the McGuffin in Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
 
2017-05-20 07:33:29 AM  

Baloo Uriza: Spaceballer: Baloo Uriza: If that's a 10 foot gator, then those are unusually narrow lanes for a freeway.  12 foot minimums are standard with ~13 feet being typical, though with newer California (since the 1990s when lane splitting took off and probably certainly going forward after 2016 when California formally codified the practice) freeways getting 15 foot lanes.  For comparison, a bicycle lane is typically 6 or 7 feet wide, a parking space is typically 7 feet wide and a residential  collector has lanes typically 10 feet wide.

It didn't happen on a freeway, the gator was hit on a state road.

This article is a little better.

Doh.  Now I see the yellow centerline.  That said, state roads can be freeways, too.  Beaverton-Tigard Freeway, the Arroyo Seco Parkway, Bennett Causeway and the Broken Arrow Expressway are all examples of state roads as freeways.  Amusingly, Arroyo Seco being built was the McGuffin in Who Framed Roger Rabbit?


Also, depending on the speed limit on that, 10 foot lanes would still be narrow, 11-13 foot lanes are more typical on 45+ MPH roads.
 
2017-05-20 08:36:54 AM  

Baloo Uriza: Baloo Uriza: Spaceballer: Baloo Uriza: If that's a 10 foot gator, then those are unusually narrow lanes for a freeway.  12 foot minimums are standard with ~13 feet being typical, though with newer California (since the 1990s when lane splitting took off and probably certainly going forward after 2016 when California formally codified the practice) freeways getting 15 foot lanes.  For comparison, a bicycle lane is typically 6 or 7 feet wide, a parking space is typically 7 feet wide and a residential  collector has lanes typically 10 feet wide.

It didn't happen on a freeway, the gator was hit on a state road.

This article is a little better.

Doh.  Now I see the yellow centerline.  That said, state roads can be freeways, too.  Beaverton-Tigard Freeway, the Arroyo Seco Parkway, Bennett Causeway and the Broken Arrow Expressway are all examples of state roads as freeways.  Amusingly, Arroyo Seco being built was the McGuffin in Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

Also, depending on the speed limit on that, 10 foot lanes would still be narrow, 11-13 foot lanes are more typical on 45+ MPH roads.


The speed limit is 60 MPH there. I've driven it countless times. I've never measured the road, but it doesn't feel narrow, even in a large truck.
img.fark.netView Full Size
It used to be a nice rural area until they started destroying the land for phosphate mining. Which is probably what drove the gator from it's home.
 
2017-05-20 12:08:32 PM  

Spaceballer: Baloo Uriza: Baloo Uriza: Spaceballer: Baloo Uriza: If that's a 10 foot gator, then those are unusually narrow lanes for a freeway.  12 foot minimums are standard with ~13 feet being typical, though with newer California (since the 1990s when lane splitting took off and probably certainly going forward after 2016 when California formally codified the practice) freeways getting 15 foot lanes.  For comparison, a bicycle lane is typically 6 or 7 feet wide, a parking space is typically 7 feet wide and a residential  collector has lanes typically 10 feet wide.

It didn't happen on a freeway, the gator was hit on a state road.

This article is a little better.

Doh.  Now I see the yellow centerline.  That said, state roads can be freeways, too.  Beaverton-Tigard Freeway, the Arroyo Seco Parkway, Bennett Causeway and the Broken Arrow Expressway are all examples of state roads as freeways.  Amusingly, Arroyo Seco being built was the McGuffin in Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

Also, depending on the speed limit on that, 10 foot lanes would still be narrow, 11-13 foot lanes are more typical on 45+ MPH roads.

The speed limit is 60 MPH there. I've driven it countless times. I've never measured the road, but it doesn't feel narrow, even in a large truck.
[img.fark.net image 425x277]It used to be a nice rural area until they started destroying the land for phosphate mining. Which is probably what drove the gator from it's home.


Other possibility is that they're lowballing that gator's size.
 
2017-05-20 12:48:32 PM  

Baloo Uriza: Spaceballer: Baloo Uriza: Baloo Uriza: Spaceballer: Baloo Uriza: If that's a 10 foot gator, then those are unusually narrow lanes for a freeway.  12 foot minimums are standard with ~13 feet being typical, though with newer California (since the 1990s when lane splitting took off and probably certainly going forward after 2016 when California formally codified the practice) freeways getting 15 foot lanes.  For comparison, a bicycle lane is typically 6 or 7 feet wide, a parking space is typically 7 feet wide and a residential  collector has lanes typically 10 feet wide.

It didn't happen on a freeway, the gator was hit on a state road.

This article is a little better.

Doh.  Now I see the yellow centerline.  That said, state roads can be freeways, too.  Beaverton-Tigard Freeway, the Arroyo Seco Parkway, Bennett Causeway and the Broken Arrow Expressway are all examples of state roads as freeways.  Amusingly, Arroyo Seco being built was the McGuffin in Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

Also, depending on the speed limit on that, 10 foot lanes would still be narrow, 11-13 foot lanes are more typical on 45+ MPH roads.

The speed limit is 60 MPH there. I've driven it countless times. I've never measured the road, but it doesn't feel narrow, even in a large truck.
[img.fark.net image 425x277]It used to be a nice rural area until they started destroying the land for phosphate mining. Which is probably what drove the gator from it's home.

Other possibility is that they're lowballing that gator's size.


According to the other article it happened "early Friday morning" so it was probably dark.  I have a Road Glide (two headlights) and even with the brights on it would be very easy not to see a gator until it was too late.
 
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