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(BBC-US)   Scientists may have found a "wonder-drug" that will stop all neurodegenerative brain diseases, including duh   ( bbc.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Neurology, brain cells, Alzheimer's disease, Neuron, human clinical trials, Neurodegenerative disorders, neurodegenerative brain diseases, Neurodegeneration  
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8466 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Apr 2017 at 11:20 AM (25 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-04-21 09:22:18 AM  
Does it also hijack my browser and tell me I've won a $100 gift card, because fark you.
 
2017-04-21 10:34:11 AM  
In related news, foo monkeys are easily taunted by the internet.
 
2017-04-21 11:23:51 AM  
Scientists hope they have found a drug to stop all neurodegenerative brain diseases, including dementia.

"I need this drug quickly and bigly"
img.fark.net
 
2017-04-21 11:25:49 AM  
Still can't fix stupid
 
2017-04-21 11:26:48 AM  

AlwaysRightBoy: In related news, foo monkeys are easily taunted by the internet.


Don't mess with my toilet time, brah.
 
2017-04-21 11:26:53 AM  
p2.la-img.com
 
2017-04-21 11:27:49 AM  
Scientists need to step up and be responsible for their own science reporting. Instead of waiting around while some idiot at the BBC completely misrepresents your findings how about paying for someone competent to be there reporting on science? They need to do something because for the vast majority of the public all they see day after day is really shiatty science reporting, and then they go and vote for politicians based on this. The lack of respect for science in the general public is largely a result of reading crap headlines like this.
 
2017-04-21 11:29:00 AM  
DUH!

img.fark.net
 
2017-04-21 11:29:41 AM  

Russ1642: Scientists need to step up and be responsible for their own science reporting. Instead of waiting around while some idiot at the BBC completely misrepresents your findings how about paying for someone competent to be there reporting on science? They need to do something because for the vast majority of the public all they see day after day is really shiatty science reporting, and then they go and vote for politicians based on this. The lack of respect for science in the general public is largely a result of reading crap headlines like this.


Obligatory:
blogs.discovermagazine.com
 
2017-04-21 11:30:08 AM  
Will anyone who needs it be actually able to afford it?
 
2017-04-21 11:30:26 AM  

Russ1642: Scientists need to step up and be responsible for their own science reporting. Instead of waiting around while some idiot at the BBC completely misrepresents your findings how about paying for someone competent to be there reporting on science? They need to do something because for the vast majority of the public all they see day after day is really shiatty science reporting, and then they go and vote for politicians based on this. The lack of respect for science in the general public is largely a result of reading crap headlines like this.


Scientists have actually studied this problem, and they found that the enemy is us.
 
2017-04-21 11:31:48 AM  

Merltech: Will anyone who needs it be actually able to afford it?


A lot of people already take Trazodone for depression.   Though maybe they'll raise the price if it really does all this other stuff too.
 
2017-04-21 11:34:08 AM  
Also: Brain and brain! What is brain?!
i.ytimg.com
 
2017-04-21 11:35:25 AM  
Unobtanium:Obligatory:
[blogs.discovermagazine.com image 600x667]


Damn you.
 
2017-04-21 11:40:16 AM  

Unobtanium: Also: Brain and brain! What is brain?!
[i.ytimg.com image 480x360]


img.fark.net
 
2017-04-21 11:42:25 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-04-21 11:43:37 AM  
tse2.mm.bing.net
 
2017-04-21 11:43:59 AM  
As someone on the cusp of the deep slide, I wish you younger people good news in the future.
It's all fun and games until someone loses an I.
 
d23 [BareFark]
2017-04-21 11:46:19 AM  

The Fonz: [img.fark.net image 850x471]


I'm calling foul.  That's technically a Flowers for Algernon reference, so it's a repeat.
 
2017-04-21 11:49:13 AM  

d23: The Fonz: [img.fark.net image 850x471]

I'm calling foul.  That's technically a Flowers for Algernon reference, so it's a repeat.


Same duh, different format
 
2017-04-21 11:53:04 AM  
From what I can tell, trazadone is a British-only new wonder drug for dementia. The NIH here in the US has studies using trazadone going back at least to 1986. Effectiveness varies, the question becomes one of how and why depression is occurring and trazadone may help with some patients (the study I'm aware of had an improvement rate of around 65%).

For us here in the US, 65% effectivity is so-so. It appears that's miraculous under the British NHS, maybe because trazadone is super cheap and worth trying first . Talk it up, get extra placebo effects to boot. Everyone wins.
 
2017-04-21 11:54:52 AM  

foo monkey: Does it also hijack my browser and tell me I've won a $100 gift card, because fark you.


That has happened to me on Fark also
 
2017-04-21 11:57:54 AM  
Will it restore to Brits the ability to read a paragraph containing more than one sentence?
 
2017-04-21 11:59:28 AM  

roostercube: From what I can tell, trazadone is a British-only new wonder drug for dementia. The NIH here in the US has studies using trazadone going back at least to 1986. Effectiveness varies, the question becomes one of how and why depression is occurring and trazadone may help with some patients (the study I'm aware of had an improvement rate of around 65%).

For us here in the US, 65% effectivity is so-so. It appears that's miraculous under the British NHS, maybe because trazadone is super cheap and worth trying first . Talk it up, get extra placebo effects to boot. Everyone wins.


You're talking about the NHS, the same people who pushed homeopathic treatments for years. Of course 65% is miraculous.  To them placebos are miraculous
 
2017-04-21 12:06:32 PM  

uber humper: roostercube: From what I can tell, trazadone is a British-only new wonder drug for dementia. The NIH here in the US has studies using trazadone going back at least to 1986. Effectiveness varies, the question becomes one of how and why depression is occurring and trazadone may help with some patients (the study I'm aware of had an improvement rate of around 65%).

For us here in the US, 65% effectivity is so-so. It appears that's miraculous under the British NHS, maybe because trazadone is super cheap and worth trying first . Talk it up, get extra placebo effects to boot. Everyone wins.

You're talking about the NHS, the same people who pushed homeopathic treatments for years. Of course 65% is miraculous.  To them placebos are miraculous


NHS funding: £120bn
NHS homeopathy funding: £1.75m,

So that's 1.483E^-4. It is not a lot. About 27p per person in the UK per year.

I'm not saying that homeopathy isn't rubbish. It is. The placebo effect is real enough, though, and it might be that the flimflam is cost effective.
 
2017-04-21 12:09:12 PM  

Schmerd1948: As someone on the cusp of the deep slide, I wish you younger people good news in the future.
It's all fun and games until someone loses an I.


My sympathies.
I'm sure you've thought about so many things to look into, so I'm probably repeating stuff, and I apologize. I'm just mentioning in case you might consider it helpful.
1) pick up new things to challenge the brain, both mental based and motor-skills based. A new language, juggling, puzzle games, video games, whatever you think will give you a bit of a stretch.
2) I recall some studies tying these kind of things to, oddly enough, loneliness. It seems like the brain, when it lacks companionship seems to say "I don't want to accept this reality" and fades away. Look into programs where you can mentor, teach, play chess, -again, whatever suits you- to have decent human connections, and as frequent as possible.

I feel the urge to end this post with some teasing, but for the life of me can't come up with anything.
So just pretend I said something teasing and witty.
;)
 
2017-04-21 12:10:26 PM  
Any drug mentioned on Fark on 4/21 will be classified as a drug too much like a drug mentioned on 4/20. That's how I roll.

img.fark.net
 
2017-04-21 12:10:28 PM  

PartTimeBuddha: uber humper: roostercube: From what I can tell, trazadone is a British-only new wonder drug for dementia. The NIH here in the US has studies using trazadone going back at least to 1986. Effectiveness varies, the question becomes one of how and why depression is occurring and trazadone may help with some patients (the study I'm aware of had an improvement rate of around 65%).

For us here in the US, 65% effectivity is so-so. It appears that's miraculous under the British NHS, maybe because trazadone is super cheap and worth trying first . Talk it up, get extra placebo effects to boot. Everyone wins.

You're talking about the NHS, the same people who pushed homeopathic treatments for years. Of course 65% is miraculous.  To them placebos are miraculous

NHS funding: £120bn
NHS homeopathy funding: £1.75m,

So that's 1.483E^-4. It is not a lot. About 27p per person in the UK per year.

I'm not saying that homeopathy isn't rubbish. It is. The placebo effect is real enough, though, and it might be that the flimflam is cost effective.


They need to cut that down to something like E^-20 to have it homeopathically funded. Just remember to shake the budget properly.
 
2017-04-21 12:13:42 PM  
Republicans will vote to ban it as a conservative to liberal conversion drug.
 
2017-04-21 12:15:24 PM  
Priapism, one of our favorite side effects. "Trazodone gives you the bone"
 
2017-04-21 12:18:03 PM  

serfdood: [p2.la-img.com image 600x866]


A book far fewer people would have heard of were it not for It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia.
 
2017-04-21 12:20:59 PM  

roostercube: From what I can tell, trazadone is a British-only new wonder drug for dementia.



pbs.twimg.com
/British-only wonder-something, Trenzalore?
 
2017-04-21 12:21:51 PM  
I wonder how large the profit margin is?
 
2017-04-21 12:22:10 PM  

Resident Muslim: Schmerd1948: As someone on the cusp of the deep slide, I wish you younger people good news in the future.
It's all fun and games until someone loses an I.

My sympathies.
I'm sure you've thought about so many things to look into, so I'm probably repeating stuff, and I apologize. I'm just mentioning in case you might consider it helpful.
1) pick up new things to challenge the brain, both mental based and motor-skills based. A new language, juggling, puzzle games, video games, whatever you think will give you a bit of a stretch.
2) I recall some studies tying these kind of things to, oddly enough, loneliness. It seems like the brain, when it lacks companionship seems to say "I don't want to accept this reality" and fades away. Look into programs where you can mentor, teach, play chess, -again, whatever suits you- to have decent human connections, and as frequent as possible.

I feel the urge to end this post with some teasing, but for the life of me can't come up with anything.
So just pretend I said something teasing and witty.
;)


Also blueberries and excercise

If I recall the number of berries to see an improvement was only equivilat to 15 per day in the study
http://www.medicaldaily.com/blueberries-alzheimers-disease-anthocyani​n​s-377615

Some studies have also linked Alzhimers to herpies virus (cold sores) if you are overly susceptible to those, you may consider treating yourself with acyclovir which does a good job keeping the virus in check.
 
d23 [BareFark]
2017-04-21 12:23:10 PM  

PartTimeBuddha: I'm not saying that homeopathy isn't rubbish. It is. The placebo effect is real enough, though, and it might be that the flimflam is cost effective.


Also, this is not a comment that means I believe in homoeopathy, but homoeopathy does have some testing where it does better than placebo.  That's why it has always been hard to write it off once and for all.
 
d23 [BareFark]
2017-04-21 12:24:42 PM  

Enigmamf: serfdood: [p2.la-img.com image 600x866]

A book far fewer people would have heard of were it not for It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia.


At least in the 70s and 80s we were still studying the short story version in school.  I don't know if that's done any more now, though.
 
2017-04-21 12:25:47 PM  

PartTimeBuddha: The placebo effect is real enough, though


The placebo effect does not mean that sham treatments are effective.

See for example: http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2016/12/20/does-thinking-m​ake-it-so-​the-placebo-myth-rears-its-ugly-head-again/ (with lots of reading-worth links)
 
2017-04-21 12:26:29 PM  

roostercube: From what I can tell, trazadone is a British-only new wonder drug for dementia. The NIH here in the US has studies using trazadone going back at least to 1986. Effectiveness varies, the question becomes one of how and why depression is occurring and trazadone may help with some patients (the study I'm aware of had an improvement rate of around 65%).

For us here in the US, 65% effectivity is so-so. It appears that's miraculous under the British NHS, maybe because trazadone is super cheap and worth trying first . Talk it up, get extra placebo effects to boot. Everyone wins.


So was that study just on the efficacy of trazadone for the treatment of depression alone? Did it study neurodegenerative effects as well? And what about the other drug, dibenzoylmethane, that the article mentions?
 
2017-04-21 12:26:32 PM  
Walker:
"I need this drug quickly and bigly"
[img.fark.net image 850x531]


Subtle propaganda is the best propaganda right? Yeah, low energy. But keep it up, you'll keep losing elections. Though maybe if you take this drug you'll figure out endless streams of empty mudslinging doesn't win elections.
 
2017-04-21 12:26:51 PM  

d23: PartTimeBuddha: I'm not saying that homeopathy isn't rubbish. It is. The placebo effect is real enough, though, and it might be that the flimflam is cost effective.

Also, this is not a comment that means I believe in homoeopathy, but homoeopathy does have some testing where it does better than placebo.  That's why it has always been hard to write it off once and for all.


So do green M&Ms!
 
2017-04-21 12:27:33 PM  

roostercube: For us here in the US, 65% effectivity is so-so. It appears that's miraculous under the British NHS, maybe because trazadone is super cheap and worth trying first


Trazadone?  More like traza-BONE, amirite?

/i hope someone gets it :(
 
2017-04-21 12:29:08 PM  

d23: Also, this is not a comment that means I believe in homoeopathy, but homoeopathy does have some testing where it does better than placebo. That's why it has always been hard to write it off once and for all.


I'd be willing to bet with a basic science education you'd be able to read the study that did the testing and figure out why it's crap science.

If you like, post one and I'll help you.
 
2017-04-21 12:30:57 PM  

Walker: Scientists hope they have found a drug to stop all neurodegenerative brain diseases, including dementia.

"I need this drug quickly and bigly"
[img.fark.net image 850x531]


This thread has been TRUMPED!
 
2017-04-21 12:31:45 PM  
When a virus hijacks a brain cell it leads to a build-up of viral proteins.
Cells respond by shutting down nearly all protein production in order to halt the virus's spread.

In the initial study, the researchers used a compound that prevented the defence mechanism kicking in.



So... what about the original thing that the defense mechanism was responding to?
 
d23 [BareFark]
2017-04-21 12:36:52 PM  

lennavan: d23: Also, this is not a comment that means I believe in homoeopathy, but homoeopathy does have some testing where it does better than placebo. That's why it has always been hard to write it off once and for all.

I'd be willing to bet with a basic science education you'd be able to read the study that did the testing and figure out why it's crap science.

If you like, post one and I'll help you.


Well, I knew bringing that fact up would get me flamed.  Silly me.
 
2017-04-21 12:37:48 PM  

JNowe: When a virus hijacks a brain cell it leads to a build-up of viral proteins.
Cells respond by shutting down nearly all protein production in order to halt the virus's spread.
In the initial study, the researchers used a compound that prevented the defence mechanism kicking in.

So... what about the original thing that the defense mechanism was responding to?


In some medical processes, your body's response to it is worse than the process itself.  In evolution terms, it's smarter to get a quick shiatty fix that keeps you alive in the short term.  In specific examples, when you sprain your ankle, your doc will tell you RICE - rest, ice, compression, elevation.  Ice, compression and elevation all are to STOP your body's normal inflammation reaction.  We can do that now because we can rest for a few weeks and survive, evolutionary not so much.

That said, you have an incredibly important point to not forget about that.  Other people are working on that too, no doubt the drug screen the article alludes to also tested the drugs for that.
 
2017-04-21 12:41:03 PM  

d23: lennavan: d23: Also, this is not a comment that means I believe in homoeopathy, but homoeopathy does have some testing where it does better than placebo. That's why it has always been hard to write it off once and for all.

I'd be willing to bet with a basic science education you'd be able to read the study that did the testing and figure out why it's crap science.

If you like, post one and I'll help you.

Well, I knew bringing that fact up would get me flamed.  Silly me.


You deserve it, now moreso than before when you call it a "fact."  Not all testing is equal.  I'm gonna flip a coin, heads and you deserve a public flogging for your stupidity, tails and you don't.  Oop, it was heads.

Sorry man, testing proves you deserve a public flogging for your stupidity.
 
2017-04-21 12:45:16 PM  

Russ1642: Scientists need to step up and be responsible for their own science reporting. Instead of waiting around while some idiot at the BBC completely misrepresents your findings how about paying for someone competent to be there reporting on science? They need to do something because for the vast majority of the public all they see day after day is really shiatty science reporting, and then they go and vote for politicians based on this. The lack of respect for science in the general public is largely a result of reading crap headlines like this.


At least it's only one click to get to the actual paper. I like when I read something where the "source" is DailyFail linking to Guardian linking to BBC linking to something meaningful.
 
2017-04-21 12:58:22 PM  
Why are the morons testing the drugs in mice, that have a lifespan of what, two years? Use squirrels that live 20 years or something if they want a model for humans.
 
2017-04-21 12:59:01 PM  

amindtat: roostercube: From what I can tell, trazadone is a British-only new wonder drug for dementia. The NIH here in the US has studies using trazadone going back at least to 1986. Effectiveness varies, the question becomes one of how and why depression is occurring and trazadone may help with some patients (the study I'm aware of had an improvement rate of around 65%).

For us here in the US, 65% effectivity is so-so. It appears that's miraculous under the British NHS, maybe because trazadone is super cheap and worth trying first . Talk it up, get extra placebo effects to boot. Everyone wins.

So was that study just on the efficacy of trazadone for the treatment of depression alone? Did it study neurodegenerative effects as well? And what about the other drug, dibenzoylmethane, that the article mentions?


It was using trazadone for those with dementia suffering from depression (they are often tightly coupled). Trazadone is known to be effective for some types of depression, so what about dementia patients with it? They found improvement for both depression and dementia symptoms with more than half of the patients. I was once on trazadone, and with my family history of dementia, it was interesting to see the linkages. Maybe I'll end up on it, again, in 20+ years.

I haven't taken or looked at dibenzoylmethane, so can't speak to its effects. Given why it's prescribed, I think I'd prefer not learning.
 
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