Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Weather Channel)   Don't you just hate it when a freezer malfunction destroys 22,000 year-old ice cores?   ( weather.com) divider line
    More: Sad, ice cores, Climate, custom-built freezer facility, different freezer, Canadian Arctic, New York Times, glaciologist Martin Sharp, Core sample  
•       •       •

1070 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Apr 2017 at 1:40 AM (40 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



51 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2017-04-18 11:39:21 PM  
If only Bart had called them. He could've spared them quite a bit of spoilage.
 
2017-04-18 11:43:38 PM  
Reptillicus?
 
2017-04-18 11:43:48 PM  
And yet it spared the apostrophes.
 
2017-04-19 12:54:17 AM  

LowbrowDeluxe: Reptillicus?


Avalanche!
 
2017-04-19 01:05:51 AM  
I hope this is not as bad as it sounds.

All those collection missions, all that time, energy, and money.

One might think there would be a backup system or ten to maintain the environment for what was no less than a library of the past twenty thousand years of our climate.

Or that the samples would be divided among geographically-distributed locations.
 
2017-04-19 01:05:59 AM  
I've got ice cream that's been around awhile, but damn.
 
2017-04-19 01:38:47 AM  
I mean, yeah, its  a bunch of ice cores, but do they really need 22,000 of them?
 
2017-04-19 01:44:00 AM  
lh5.ggpht.comView Full Size
 
2017-04-19 02:01:07 AM  
Idiots. Why waste time and money on something so stupid? The Earth is only 6,000 years old, anyway. This is a sign from God that the refrigeration system is a waste of taxpayer money and funds should be diverted to something that is actually useful.
 
2017-04-19 02:08:53 AM  
That's cold, mang.
 
2017-04-19 02:15:20 AM  
On the bright side - you now have 22,000 year old water.  That has to count for something.
 
2017-04-19 02:24:50 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-04-19 02:28:01 AM  

garron: On the bright side - you now have 22,000 year old water.  That has to count for something.


Don't give Nestlé executives any ideas of 'ancient, artisan, mammoth spring run-off' in bottles for the rubes.
 
2017-04-19 02:44:04 AM  
i40.tinypic.comView Full Size
 
2017-04-19 02:44:21 AM  
There must have been some evidence that didn't support the narrative.
 
2017-04-19 02:55:31 AM  

garron: On the bright side - you now have 22,000 year old water.  That has to count for something.


Do you know what fish do in that water?
 
2017-04-19 03:20:49 AM  

garron: On the bright side - you now have 22,000 year old water.  That has to count for something.


You can take a swig if you want, but the second you start eating people and shapeshifting I'm-a gettin' a flamethrower.
 
2017-04-19 03:23:52 AM  

drumhellar: I mean, yeah, its  a bunch of ice cores, but do they really need 22,000 of them?


And they're only a year old. I've got cheap wine from before that.
 
2017-04-19 03:27:13 AM  
We all know they're faking the data anyway

i'm kidding. don't kill me
 
2017-04-19 03:27:16 AM  
So they'd moved 90% of their ice cores to another freezer for filming by a tv crew? I could see one of those sleazy reality-TV producer types flipping the refrigerator from "freeze" to "heat" and filming the reactions for cheap ratings boosts.
 
2017-04-19 03:46:04 AM  
Okay, I did not read TFA, but... can't they just go get some more ? I mean, sure, it will cost money, but nothing truly irreplaceable were lost.
 
2017-04-19 04:15:04 AM  

LowbrowDeluxe: Reptillicus?


Jorgensen accidentally unplugged the freezer.
 
2017-04-19 04:20:06 AM  

Damnhippyfreak: LowbrowDeluxe: Reptillicus?

Jorgensen Petersen accidentally unplugged the freezer.


How could I get that wrong even with the comedic stylings of the one and only Dirch Passer?
 
2017-04-19 04:23:52 AM  

sex_and_drugs_for_ian: There must have been some evidence that didn't support the narrative.


Yeah. Totally.
It's a conspiracy man.
 
2017-04-19 05:12:53 AM  
I'm impressed the freezer lasted that long.  Way out of warranty though.
 
2017-04-19 05:27:50 AM  

SquirrelNova: So they'd moved 90% of their ice cores to another freezer for filming by a tv crew? I could see one of those sleazy reality-TV producer types flipping the refrigerator from "freeze" to "heat" and filming the reactions for cheap ratings boosts.


You got pretty good eyes!
 
2017-04-19 05:46:36 AM  
WTF designed that control system??

And Jeezus, man...warming up a 10K year old ice core NEVER ends well.
 
2017-04-19 05:55:44 AM  
Do you need any more proof of global warming than this?
 
2017-04-19 06:12:08 AM  

fastfxr: WTF designed that control system??

And Jeezus, man...warming up a 10K year old ice core NEVER ends well.


I'm sort of flummoxed too. Why on Earth would you ever pipe heat into a freezer? I guess for defrosting... but this was a cold storage facility where things would be kept cold for years. That's like having a hose spigot in a room designed to store pure sodium.
 
2017-04-19 06:21:05 AM  
It's not like there isn't entire fields of 22000 year old ice out there.  They can always go get more if they need.
 
2017-04-19 06:26:51 AM  

padraig: Okay, I did not read TFA, but... can't they just go get some more ? I mean, sure, it will cost money, but nothing truly irreplaceable were lost.


Imagine it wasn't ice.  Imagine it was a freezer full of taro tuna for sushi and it's all ruined.  Sure you could go out and get more, but you spent all that time and money buying that tuna, even buying a special freezer to preserve it at just the right temperature, and now all that time and money has been wasted because the tuna is ruined.

Not irreplaceable, but still crushing disappointment.
 
VYV [TotalFark]
2017-04-19 06:36:32 AM  

antron: [i40.tinypic.com image 320x244]


DAMNIT!

FINE...
"you know what I really hate? Everytime my freezer goes on the fritz and... "
"oh, and melts all the 22,000 year old ice cores ya' got in there?"

"yeah. Boy I hate when that happens..."

/ok, I feel better now.
 
2017-04-19 06:39:16 AM  

Ambivalence: padraig: Okay, I did not read TFA, but... can't they just go get some more ? I mean, sure, it will cost money, but nothing truly irreplaceable were lost.

Imagine it wasn't ice.  Imagine it was a freezer full of taro tuna for sushi and it's all ruined.  Sure you could go out and get more, but you spent all that time and money buying that tuna, even buying a special freezer to preserve it at just the right temperature, and now all that time and money has been wasted because the tuna is ruined.

Not irreplaceable, but still crushing disappointment.


I had some tuna sashimi over the weekend that probably was from a cooling facility more broken than this one.

Funky sushi is not good sushi
 
2017-04-19 07:39:36 AM  
It's all water under the fridge now.
 
2017-04-19 07:45:22 AM  

Evil Twin Skippy: That's like having a hose spigot in a room designed to store pure sodium.


There is an eye wash station and emergency shower in most rooms that contain pure sodium.
 
2017-04-19 08:50:31 AM  

LoneVVolf: Evil Twin Skippy: That's like having a hose spigot in a room designed to store pure sodium.

There is an eye wash station and emergency shower in most rooms that contain pure sodium.


And sodium is never actually stored in open air. It's inside a sealed container filled with a non-reactive fluid, usually mineral oil. That was a stupid premise and I should be ashamed of myself.
 
2017-04-19 08:56:11 AM  

Evil Twin Skippy: fastfxr: WTF designed that control system??

And Jeezus, man...warming up a 10K year old ice core NEVER ends well.

I'm sort of flummoxed too. Why on Earth would you ever pipe heat into a freezer? I guess for defrosting... but this was a cold storage facility where things would be kept cold for years. That's like having a hose spigot in a room designed to store pure sodium.


Freezer design temperature is typically -10F (although many labs require even lower).  At that temperature any humidity (from opening the door, breathing in the room) will form frost on the evaporator coil, reducing cooling capacity.  That is why refrigeration systems for freezers are designed with a defrost system that will (based on simply time in many cases) heat up the evaporator(s) to melt the frost/ice and then resume normal operation.  There are two ways to defrost a coil, electric defrost and hot gas defrost - both of which heat up the coil briefly.  In this case it sounds to me like a hot gas defrost system and the defrost control/hot gas bypass failed, leading to continuous heating of the coil.

/finally something I know enough about to comment!
//I design this stuff all day
///refrigeration is cool
 
2017-04-19 09:50:24 AM  
Pour it back in the hole and you've got your ice back!
 
2017-04-19 10:20:28 AM  

SquirrelNova: So they'd moved 90% of their ice cores to another freezer for filming by a tv crew? I could see one of those sleazy reality-TV producer types flipping the refrigerator from "freeze" to "heat" and filming the reactions for cheap ratings boosts.


Was this guy in the TV crew?
mikeduran.comView Full Size
 
2017-04-19 10:25:02 AM  

LowbrowDeluxe: Reptillicus?


it's not That bad
 
2017-04-19 10:56:29 AM  

Evil Twin Skippy: fastfxr: WTF designed that control system??

And Jeezus, man...warming up a 10K year old ice core NEVER ends well.

I'm sort of flummoxed too. Why on Earth would you ever pipe heat into a freezer? I guess for defrosting... but this was a cold storage facility where things would be kept cold for years. That's like having a hose spigot in a room designed to store pure sodium.


I get the impression that it might have had a "failure priority" system in place.  Where the original freezer was to be protected others had to be sacrificed because the larger heatpumps couldn't be cycled fast enough.

Not ideal for sure but especially in research areas expansions are haphazard and its likely the other freezers were brought in without refactoring the emergency power loss/failure plan.  AKA "They guy who built this left and the new guy didn't understand every feature involved."
 
2017-04-19 11:20:54 AM  
I'll weep more for irreplaceable artifacts and specimens being lost.
Sorry about all that work, but you'll just have to drill 'em again.
 
2017-04-19 11:23:55 AM  

UnspokenVoice: SquirrelNova: So they'd moved 90% of their ice cores to another freezer for filming by a tv crew? I could see one of those sleazy reality-TV producer types flipping the refrigerator from "freeze" to "heat" and filming the reactions for cheap ratings boosts.

You got pretty good eyes!


Your wouldn't believe the things I've seen with your eyes
 
2017-04-19 11:28:23 AM  
Now to open a topless bottomless convenience store
 
2017-04-19 11:40:01 AM  

Splinthar: Evil Twin Skippy: fastfxr: WTF designed that control system??

And Jeezus, man...warming up a 10K year old ice core NEVER ends well.

I'm sort of flummoxed too. Why on Earth would you ever pipe heat into a freezer? I guess for defrosting... but this was a cold storage facility where things would be kept cold for years. That's like having a hose spigot in a room designed to store pure sodium.

I get the impression that it might have had a "failure priority" system in place.  Where the original freezer was to be protected others had to be sacrificed because the larger heatpumps couldn't be cycled fast enough.

Not ideal for sure but especially in research areas expansions are haphazard and its likely the other freezers were brought in without refactoring the emergency power loss/failure plan.  AKA "They guy who built this left and the new guy didn't understand every feature involved."


I'd be willing to bet (if I had any money, that is) that this was a failure of a defrost component in the refrigeration system.  That is assuming a few things, for example that there was heat being produced in the room instead of the door just being left open.
 
2017-04-19 11:55:52 AM  
I didn't even know we'd been coring ice for that long.  How did they store them before refrigerators?
 
2017-04-19 01:16:43 PM  

JNowe: I didn't even know we'd been coring ice for that long.  How did they store them before refrigerators?


Very carefully
 
2017-04-19 02:21:19 PM  

Fano: UnspokenVoice: SquirrelNova: So they'd moved 90% of their ice cores to another freezer for filming by a tv crew? I could see one of those sleazy reality-TV producer types flipping the refrigerator from "freeze" to "heat" and filming the reactions for cheap ratings boosts.

You got pretty good eyes!

Your wouldn't believe the things I've seen with your eyes


If you're looking through my eyes, you've seen me naked. Pretty sweet, huh?
 
2017-04-19 05:43:38 PM  
Damn, I hope they had a chance to do some analysis before this incident happened.
 
2017-04-19 10:20:21 PM  
I've wondered how much drilling mile deep holes in the ice has quickened the melting of said ice.
 
Displayed 50 of 51 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report