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(Ars Technica)   Taking the Nintendo Classic Edition and cranking it to 11 with the Raspberry Pi   ( arstechnica.com) divider line
    More: Giggity, Memory card, Raspberry Pi, Universal Serial Bus, NES Classic Edition, official Pi case, official Raspberry Pi, different Pi cases, micro USB  
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3654 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Apr 2017 at 9:11 AM (26 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-04-18 08:00:44 AM  
so funny that this is just now getting attention.  I got my raspberry pi 3 specifically for this purpose and I've had it over a year now.
 
2017-04-18 08:03:50 AM  
Grab 2 MicroSD's.

Use one for the emulators, and use the other for Pi-Hole.

I actually bought a second Pi just for that one program.
 
2017-04-18 09:08:16 AM  
I have some Pis (and CHIPs) that I've been wanting to do this to...  That's a handy guide.
 
2017-04-18 09:29:35 AM  
Good thing, since Nintendo evidently has stopped making them. Apparently they're allergic to money.
 
2017-04-18 09:30:24 AM  
I've been looking for a summer project. This could be it.
 
2017-04-18 09:33:20 AM  
I've been trying out Lakka (and Retroarch for pc). Can anyone with familiarity with other systems as well share an opinion?
 
2017-04-18 09:38:53 AM  

HedlessChickn: Grab 2 MicroSD's.

Use one for the emulators, and use the other for Pi-Hole.

I actually bought a second Pi just for that one program.


I have a Pi2 running pi-hole. My Pi3 has Plex/Kodi/Retropie on it. Also waiting on a shipment so I can set up a Retropie for a co-worker. He bought some crappy Atari 2600 emulator from the store the other day. I told him to return it and I would build him a much better system.

For those hooking it up to a modern TV be sure to enable gaming mode on it. A lot of the games are unplayable without it. No matter what the guy in the article says. The jumps in the Gutsman stage were impossible because of the input lag.
 
2017-04-18 09:40:01 AM  
I did this with a Raspberry Pi a couple years ago. Maybe $40 worth of components plus the Pi and just tossed an image of Retro Pi on it. It was shockingly simple.
 
2017-04-18 09:41:23 AM  

HedlessChickn: Grab 2 MicroSD's.

Use one for the emulators, and use the other for Pi-Hole.

I actually bought a second Pi just for that one program.


I have a pi zero running pi hole. Makes the net a bit nicer at home, plus I block most of the Microsoft crap..
 
2017-04-18 09:42:21 AM  
NOOBS has ready-to-install emulators:

www.raspberrypi.org

Install Lakka_RPI2, then use fileZilla to SFTP and upload ROMs.
 
2017-04-18 09:44:40 AM  
I just use my Wii U for emulation. It is already in place so I need not use up any more AV inputs.
 
2017-04-18 09:48:49 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: Good thing, since Nintendo evidently has stopped making them. Apparently they're allergic to money.


I have proposed the hypothesis that someone high-up at Nintendo is involved in a "Brewster's Millions" type of situation where they must completely bankrupt the company in order to inherit a fortune even larger than Nintendo's current net worth.
 
2017-04-18 09:55:26 AM  
Anybody able to speak to the NES Classic's output quality vs. Pi3?  Scuttlebutt was that the NESC had the best overall output quality for NES titles when compared to contemporary emulators, but I'm taking that with a massive grain of salt.  Sure, Nintendo should have the easiest time building a full NES emulator on the smallest processing footprint, but fanboys being what they are...

Also, where does the Pi3 show its limit?  NeoGeo?  PSX?  N64?  What system would be the "highest possible" to emulate fully?  Is it capable of running MAME with recent arcade ROMs without choking to death on sprite load?  Trying to decide if it's worth picking up a Pi3 to power an AIO arcade cab, or if I should wait for another hardware revision...
 
2017-04-18 09:59:00 AM  
Cool in principle.  Too bad it's not much use without resorting to piracy to obtain games to play on it.

I'll stick with the large stock of classic old games I've gathered on the Virtual Console.
 
2017-04-18 09:59:42 AM  

Dimensio: Tyrone Slothrop: Good thing, since Nintendo evidently has stopped making them. Apparently they're allergic to money.

I have proposed the hypothesis that someone high-up at Nintendo is involved in a "Brewster's Millions" type of situation where they must completely bankrupt the company in order to inherit a fortune even larger than Nintendo's current net worth.



I've already got a gentleman's bet with someone on the reason for the death of the NESC.  I'm standing with the "it became a piracy nightmare that can never be fixed" reasoning.  Since it's a standalone STB with no official expandability, they can't hold eShop and network access over the heads of end users ("crack this box and lose your eShop access for life").  Once the NESC had been opened up to the full library of ROMs, that was the mark of death.  Nintendo is nothing if not short-sighted, so they never imagined they'd end up slitting their own eShop throats by releasing a pure emulation box.  Pretty typical for Japanese toy companies...
 
2017-04-18 10:06:44 AM  
I just use my PC for emulation. I ran an HDMI cable to my TV so I can watch video/play games on that if I want, though I do still need to get a wireless controller at some point for more convenience. Total cost of the setup was only $9.
 
2017-04-18 10:06:54 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Cool in principle.  Too bad it's not much use without resorting to piracy to obtain games to play on it.

I'll stick with the large stock of classic old games I've gathered on the Virtual Console.


I'm quite happy with my emulator box of every NES,SNES,GEN,PS,DC,c64,MAME, and DOS game.  Was going to the store to go buy some games and realized *they don't fark'n sell them anymore*.
 
2017-04-18 10:09:42 AM  
I just got my Pi working with RetroPie. I was expecting at least a weekend of configging and compiling the sudo bash -r -f /t /{r-f-t-glexo [symbolForBoron]} and getting so frustrated with all the Linux I'd pull out my hair in frustration but it was surprisingly easy. Took me half a lunch break to get it all up and running. Now I just need to get some wireless controllers so I can actually sit on my couch and play.

PEWPEWPEW!!!
 
2017-04-18 10:10:17 AM  

sn0wblind: Doc Daneeka: Cool in principle.  Too bad it's not much use without resorting to piracy to obtain games to play on it.

I'll stick with the large stock of classic old games I've gathered on the Virtual Console.

I'm quite happy with my emulator box of every NES,SNES,GEN,PS,DC,c64,MAME, and DOS game.  Was going to the store to go buy some games and realized *they don't fark'n sell them anymore*.


Yeah, I have no moral issues with pirating a game when there's no way to purchase it new, since in that case no matter how you acquire it the devs won't be getting any money out of the deal. Mostly I just "pirate" games I already own, simply because it's so much more convenient to play on an emulator, and can look a hell of a lot nicer too.
 
2017-04-18 10:18:26 AM  

SirSigsegV: sn0wblind: Doc Daneeka: Cool in principle.  Too bad it's not much use without resorting to piracy to obtain games to play on it.

I'll stick with the large stock of classic old games I've gathered on the Virtual Console.

I'm quite happy with my emulator box of every NES,SNES,GEN,PS,DC,c64,MAME, and DOS game.  Was going to the store to go buy some games and realized *they don't fark'n sell them anymore*.

Yeah, I have no moral issues with pirating a game when there's no way to purchase it new, since in that case no matter how you acquire it the devs won't be getting any money out of the deal. Mostly I just "pirate" games I already own, simply because it's so much more convenient to play on an emulator, and can look a hell of a lot nicer too.


Even when you do legally buy modern releases of games, the money often goes to people who had no hand in developing it. Many of the digital legacy titles available today had their rights acquired by a publisher or third party long ago, and the devs don't see a dime of the digital action.

I have less of a problem with this on platforms like GOG, where the retailer has gone to great lengths to make the game not only affordable, but playable on modern hardware and DRM-free - I feel like in that case, the price you're paying is for supporting preservation. But some of the cynical stuff that's gone on with Steam and the console platforms where rights holders are just releasing emulated versions of old games for a premium price really bugs me enough to not want to give them my money.
 
2017-04-18 10:19:00 AM  
Munden

so funny that this is just now getting attention. I got my raspberry pi 3 specifically for this purpose and I've had it over a year now.

My son did this about a year ago for a middle school science project. Has NES, SNES, Sega Genesis, PS1 and like 1500 games.
 
2017-04-18 10:41:18 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Cool in principle.  Too bad it's not much use without resorting to piracy to obtain games to play on it.


Nintendo should have thought of that before making the alternative nearly impossible to get.
 
2017-04-18 10:46:08 AM  

HedlessChickn: Grab 2 MicroSD's.

Use one for the emulators, and use the other for Pi-Hole.

I actually bought a second Pi just for that one program.


They don't make a Pi with two SD slots? So you have to swap SD cards?

Which Pi are you using for Pi-Hole?
 
2017-04-18 10:54:26 AM  

SirSigsegV: I just use my PC for emulation. I ran an HDMI cable to my TV so I can watch video/play games on that if I want, though I do still need to get a wireless controller at some point for more convenience. Total cost of the setup was only $9.


Ditto.

I'll say, the wirless steam controller works well for a bunch of games, too. Fist controller I've owned wpsince ye olde Wii the  First
 
2017-04-18 10:56:21 AM  

soporific: I've been looking for a summer project. This could be it.


Took me an hour, download time included, to get everything up and running.
 
2017-04-18 11:03:26 AM  

HedlessChickn: Grab 2 MicroSD's.

Use one for the emulators, and use the other for Pi-Hole.

I actually bought a second Pi just for that one program.


Why would you do that?  Download Noobs it has a launcher for laaka and pi so you can do it all from one card.
 
2017-04-18 11:14:08 AM  

TNel: HedlessChickn: Grab 2 MicroSD's.

Use one for the emulators, and use the other for Pi-Hole.

I actually bought a second Pi just for that one program.

Why would you do that?  Download Noobs it has a launcher for laaka and pi so you can do it all from one card.


Well because pi-hole replaces your DNS. If you don't mind turning off your internet every time you want to play some games that's cool. Probably not ideal if there are more than one person in your household.
 
2017-04-18 11:19:07 AM  

xalres: I just got my Pi working with RetroPie. I was expecting at least a weekend of configging and compiling the sudo bash -r -f /t /{r-f-t-glexo [symbolForBoron]} and getting so frustrated with all the Linux I'd pull out my hair in frustration but it was surprisingly easy. Took me half a lunch break to get it all up and running. Now I just need to get some wireless controllers so I can actually sit on my couch and play.

PEWPEWPEW!!!


I highly recommend the offerings from 8bitdo.  I use their NEX30 Pro controller for playing emulated games on my old cell phone, and the thing is a fantastic piece of gadgetry.  Their regular NES30 controllers are also a near-perfect match for the OG NES pads, albeit with some extra buttons.  Worth the price.

http://www.8bitdo.com/

For my PC, I use a Dual Shock 4, because I'm weird like that.  But for all retro games, that 8bitdo pad is spectacular.
 
2017-04-18 11:19:28 AM  
That should have been NES30 Pro, not NEX...
 
2017-04-18 11:20:57 AM  

Halli: My Pi3 has Plex/Kodi/Retropie on it.


Does your Kodi look very grainy?  I have 1080p rips and it's very grainy on my tv but when I use my real laptop the rips look great.  I stopped using my pi for video playback because of it.  I have a 4k TV, if that makes any difference.
 
2017-04-18 11:27:16 AM  
If you get a 64GB SD card, it will come formatted with ExFat, which the Pi can't use. You will need a third party formatter to make it Fat32. You can skip that step with a smaller card. You can get cases from some online vendors that look a lot like the classic consoles as well.
 
2017-04-18 11:28:21 AM  

Halli: Well because pi-hole replaces your DNS. If you don't mind turning off your internet every time you want to play some games that's cool. Probably not ideal if there are more than one person in your household.


Why don't you have in your router:  Primary DNS: Pi-Hole; Seconadary: 8.8.8.8?  Mine works great.  When I'm playing games it defaults to google, when I'm done it goes to pi hole.
 
2017-04-18 11:29:33 AM  

Vash's Apprentice: Doc Daneeka: Cool in principle.  Too bad it's not much use without resorting to piracy to obtain games to play on it.

Nintendo should have thought of that before making the alternative nearly impossible to get.


Nintendo still operates an alternative source for buying their old games.  It's called the Virtual Console.
 
2017-04-18 11:30:26 AM  

TNel: Halli: Well because pi-hole replaces your DNS. If you don't mind turning off your internet every time you want to play some games that's cool. Probably not ideal if there are more than one person in your household.

Why don't you have in your router:  Primary DNS: Pi-Hole; Seconadary: 8.8.8.8?  Mine works great.  When I'm playing games it defaults to google, when I'm done it goes to pi hole.


More onto your point what would 2 SD cards accomplish?  You would have to swap the cards each time so there would be no benefit.
 
2017-04-18 11:45:36 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Vash's Apprentice: Doc Daneeka: Cool in principle.  Too bad it's not much use without resorting to piracy to obtain games to play on it.

Nintendo should have thought of that before making the alternative nearly impossible to get.

Nintendo still operates an alternative source for buying their old games.  It's called the Virtual Console.



Which contains only a tiny fraction of the games we used to play on NES/SNES.  The vast, vast majority of games are not available (likely due to licensing issues).

Don't get me wrong, I've got a few VC games on my Wii (which is in a box, and isn't coming out ever again) and several more on my 3DS.  However, 3/4 of the games I used to play as a youth aren't available through the eShop, and likely never will be (licensing).  For all those gaps in availability, I'll stick with ROMs.  The carts are literally unavailable for a lot of games, and there are no official retail digital releases either.

/working on collecting up original carts of my old faves
//hard to do for twelve different systems, let me tell ya
 
2017-04-18 11:46:45 AM  

Kuroshin: xalres: I just got my Pi working with RetroPie. I was expecting at least a weekend of configging and compiling the sudo bash -r -f /t /{r-f-t-glexo [symbolForBoron]} and getting so frustrated with all the Linux I'd pull out my hair in frustration but it was surprisingly easy. Took me half a lunch break to get it all up and running. Now I just need to get some wireless controllers so I can actually sit on my couch and play.

PEWPEWPEW!!!

I highly recommend the offerings from 8bitdo.  I use their NEX30 Pro controller for playing emulated games on my old cell phone, and the thing is a fantastic piece of gadgetry.  Their regular NES30 controllers are also a near-perfect match for the OG NES pads, albeit with some extra buttons.  Worth the price.

http://www.8bitdo.com/

For my PC, I use a Dual Shock 4, because I'm weird like that.  But for all retro games, that 8bitdo pad is spectacular.


I've been looking at those. There's a MicroCenter near me that has them in-store so I'll probably take a trip during lunch. I tried playing with a bog standard Logitech but the D-pad on that thing is like a 4-way rocker switch instead of 4 distinct buttons. It's awful for retro games.
 
2017-04-18 11:48:15 AM  

Dimensio: Tyrone Slothrop: Good thing, since Nintendo evidently has stopped making them. Apparently they're allergic to money.

I have proposed the hypothesis that someone high-up at Nintendo is involved in a "Brewster's Millions" type of situation where they must completely bankrupt the company in order to inherit a fortune even larger than Nintendo's current net worth.


Nothing so complicated. The only reason they made the Classic was to take away the legal argument that people running emulators weren't hurting them financially because they no longer sold the games being emulated. It was purely to create proof of actual harm for when they seek injunctions against websites that host or link emulators. It's also possible that they're re-tooling for the recent announcement that they're going to greatly expand the number of Switch units they will be manufacturing. They may see the Switch as a better investment of their manufacturing capabilities because of the potential add on sales, such as games and peripherals, instead of a one-and-done for the Classic.
 
2017-04-18 11:59:20 AM  

TNel: TNel: Halli: Well because pi-hole replaces your DNS. If you don't mind turning off your internet every time you want to play some games that's cool. Probably not ideal if there are more than one person in your household.

Why don't you have in your router:  Primary DNS: Pi-Hole; Seconadary: 8.8.8.8?  Mine works great.  When I'm playing games it defaults to google, when I'm done it goes to pi hole.

More onto your point what would 2 SD cards accomplish?  You would have to swap the cards each time so there would be no benefit.


Actually I would never use two SDcards. I use berryboot personally. That was the other guy. But yeah I guess the secondary DNS thingie would work. I just didn't bother thinking about it since I had a spare Pi2 that was going to waste.

TNel: Halli: My Pi3 has Plex/Kodi/Retropie on it.

Does your Kodi look very grainy?  I have 1080p rips and it's very grainy on my tv but when I use my real laptop the rips look great.  I stopped using my pi for video playback because of it.  I have a 4k TV, if that makes any difference.


I actually just use Plex for watching rips and I haven't had any problems with picture quality. The Kodi setup is for some less than legal sports streams.
 
2017-04-18 11:59:31 AM  

TruBluTroll: Dimensio: Tyrone Slothrop: Good thing, since Nintendo evidently has stopped making them. Apparently they're allergic to money.

I have proposed the hypothesis that someone high-up at Nintendo is involved in a "Brewster's Millions" type of situation where they must completely bankrupt the company in order to inherit a fortune even larger than Nintendo's current net worth.

Nothing so complicated. The only reason they made the Classic was to take away the legal argument that people running emulators weren't hurting them financially because they no longer sold the games being emulated. It was purely to create proof of actual harm for when they seek injunctions against websites that host or link emulators. It's also possible that they're re-tooling for the recent announcement that they're going to greatly expand the number of Switch units they will be manufacturing. They may see the Switch as a better investment of their manufacturing capabilities because of the potential add on sales, such as games and peripherals, instead of a one-and-done for the Classic.



To the first point (proof of harm):  It's very likely what they originally intended.  It just kinda blew up in their faces (hacked).  Additionally, they only offered 30 games out of hundreds, so other than their most-popular first-party titles, they can't make claim to much.  Although it's pretty entertaining how fast people were able to get a legal emulator box with 30 legit ROMs, then slap all the remaining missing ROM files on there to play.  Nintendo really doesn't understand tech, which is fantastically Japanese for a company that trades on tech for their bread and butter.  "We expect people to use our products in the way we dictate.  What do you mean people are adding functionality?!  We said not to do that!"  It's worth noting that only international sales have been permanently discontinued - Japanese FamC supply will return after a brief lapse.

The second point (retooling) however doesn't hold water.  Nintendo didn't manufacture the NESC.  There's no retooling.  ROI on purchasing manufacturing time may be better on the Switch, but even that is not so clear.  Nintendo does make a profit on every console sold (both the NESC and Switch) so the cost of purchasing fab time for the NESC pays for itself while bringing in extra revenue.  Purchasing additional fab time for Switch production is wholly self-contained - ramping up has the same fixed cost either way, so cutting off NESC production only eliminates a revenue stream, not repurposes it.

Nintendo had ulterior motives for killing the NESC, and I'm betting (literally) that it was due to the emulation scene breaking the boxes into nice little universal consoles.
 
2017-04-18 12:10:50 PM  

Kuroshin: The second point (retooling) however doesn't hold water.  Nintendo didn't manufacture the NESC.  There's no retooling.  ROI on purchasing manufacturing time may be better on the Switch, but even that is not so clear.  Nintendo does make a profit on every console sold (both the NESC and Switch) so the cost of purchasing fab time for the NESC pays for itself while bringing in extra revenue.  Purchasing additional fab time for Switch production is wholly self-contained - ramping up has the same fixed cost either way, so cutting off NESC production only eliminates a revenue stream, not repurposes it.



I may retract this statement.  From my understanding, the "manufacturing centers" run by Nintendo were nothing but assembly lines where pre-fab plastics and boards from China were assembled for local distribution.  I'm seeing some language out there that this might not be the case, but nothing 100% concrete.  All signs currently still point to a manufacturing setup where components are purchased in bulk from vendors, but are then hand-assembled locally.  However, if this isn't the reality, then I will retract my statement.  It does allow for cost-savings by switching assembly priorities though, so I'm not standing behind everything I said at this point.
 
2017-04-18 12:20:14 PM  
So this kind of thing is new to me, and this was the first I was hearing about it, but it looks pretty neat and might be a fun home project for me to tackle next.

For a complete beginner, is something like this good for starting?  $99 but it's in Canadian funbux.
 
2017-04-18 12:22:02 PM  

Kuroshin: TruBluTroll: Dimensio: Tyrone Slothrop: Good thing, since Nintendo evidently has stopped making them. Apparently they're allergic to money.

I have proposed the hypothesis that someone high-up at Nintendo is involved in a "Brewster's Millions" type of situation where they must completely bankrupt the company in order to inherit a fortune even larger than Nintendo's current net worth.

Nothing so complicated. The only reason they made the Classic was to take away the legal argument that people running emulators weren't hurting them financially because they no longer sold the games being emulated. It was purely to create proof of actual harm for when they seek injunctions against websites that host or link emulators. It's also possible that they're re-tooling for the recent announcement that they're going to greatly expand the number of Switch units they will be manufacturing. They may see the Switch as a better investment of their manufacturing capabilities because of the potential add on sales, such as games and peripherals, instead of a one-and-done for the Classic.


To the first point (proof of harm):  It's very likely what they originally intended.  It just kinda blew up in their faces (hacked).  Additionally, they only offered 30 games out of hundreds, so other than their most-popular first-party titles, they can't make claim to much.  Although it's pretty entertaining how fast people were able to get a legal emulator box with 30 legit ROMs, then slap all the remaining missing ROM files on there to play.  Nintendo really doesn't understand tech, which is fantastically Japanese for a company that trades on tech for their bread and butter.  "We expect people to use our products in the way we dictate.  What do you mean people are adding functionality?!  We said not to do that!"  It's worth noting that only international sales have been permanently discontinued - Japanese FamC supply will return after a brief lapse.

The second point (retooling) however doesn't hol ...


You may have a point about the retooling. I'm not sure who is burning their chips for the Classic, but the Switch is made with AMD IP, and I assume being made by one of AMD's fab houses. As far as why they killed the Classic, I'm not so sure the hacking was the main motivator. Any PC made in the last 15 years is a perfectly suitable platform for a general purpose emulation system, and with the explosion of popularity of Raspberry Pi and other living room-friendly small form factor systems, there was already no shortage of options for hacking together an emulation machine. If that was their motivation, then it was an ill-considered one. Like closing the garage door after the horse got out of the barn; it's not even the right door to close.
 
2017-04-18 12:27:37 PM  

Kuroshin: xalres: I just got my Pi working with RetroPie. I was expecting at least a weekend of configging and compiling the sudo bash -r -f /t /{r-f-t-glexo [symbolForBoron]} and getting so frustrated with all the Linux I'd pull out my hair in frustration but it was surprisingly easy. Took me half a lunch break to get it all up and running. Now I just need to get some wireless controllers so I can actually sit on my couch and play.

PEWPEWPEW!!!

I highly recommend the offerings from 8bitdo.  I use their NEX30 Pro controller for playing emulated games on my old cell phone, and the thing is a fantastic piece of gadgetry.  Their regular NES30 controllers are also a near-perfect match for the OG NES pads, albeit with some extra buttons.  Worth the price.

http://www.8bitdo.com/

For my PC, I use a Dual Shock 4, because I'm weird like that.  But for all retro games, that 8bitdo pad is spectacular.


I have the 8bitdo pro and I love it. The only issue I have found so far is that I can't use it in Bluetooth mode for PCSX2 as the game pad plug in doesn't like it for some reason, but all I have to do is switch to wired xpad mode and it works fine. When I first got it the dpad was super stiff but it has loosened up over time and is now my go to controller for emulation. It is the perfect controller for gaming on the go with its small size and multiple modes.
 
2017-04-18 12:32:12 PM  

TruBluTroll: You may have a point about the retooling. I'm not sure who is burning their chips for the Classic, but the Switch is made with AMD IP, and I assume being made by one of AMD's fab houses. As far as why they killed the Classic, I'm not so sure the hacking was the main motivator. Any PC made in the last 15 years is a perfectly suitable platform for a general purpose emulation system, and with the explosion of popularity of Raspberry Pi and other living room-friendly small form factor systems, there was already no shortage of options for hacking together an emulation machine. If that was their motivation, then it was an ill-considered one. Like closing the garage door after the horse got out of the barn; it's not even the right door to close.



True.  But this is Nintendo we're talking about.  They've spent the past decade-plus doing everything they can possibly think of to fight the flashcart industry and emulation/piracy.  Previously, Nintendo had consoles they could put ID chips into and keep screwing with the handshake setup in order to stop each generation of hacks as they crop up.  With a never-connected console with no cart/card slot, they likely didn't think it'd be an issue.  No expansion ports puts a crimp in the system access - blackboxing their system.  What they forgot is that the very means used to produce the system can be used to add more titles and hack the interface.  The system firmware and ROM files aren't signed and passed through a security chip (like what we saw on the PS3, even though it too was eventually defeated - again, due to expansion ports/card slots), and I'm guessing this was due to cost containment, since the NESC was only $60.  Nintendo likely assumed they had done enough.  Nintendo doesn't understand hardware, or the drive of the enthusiast community - hence why they don't push harder to expand their eShop VC offerings.  They like false scarcity, and assume that everybody will toe their line.  They are very old-schoolJapanese in their attitudes.  Nintendo literally manufactured an all-in-one hackbox emulator at a budget price-point, and it freaked them the fark out.
 
2017-04-18 12:39:35 PM  

Dissociater: For a complete beginner, is something like this good for starting? $99 but it's in Canadian funbux.


You can find one for CAD$60 if you look harder ...
 
2017-04-18 12:53:55 PM  
I don't get the point. You have a computer. You have a cell phone. You probably have a tablet. WHY get another entire device just to emulate games? All of these devices have more than enough power to emulate NES, SNES, Genesis, TG-16, Master System, and several other consoles. The emulators for PC are far more versatile and are already made to scale for your television. Your PC has USB ports and probably has Bluetooth as well, so controllers are no problem.

I just don't see why anyone would spend extra for a little Pi device when they have tech laying around that can already do this. Heck, most people have an old smartphone around at this point, and even one from a few years ago is more than powerful enough to be turned into an emulator console. All the emulators are on Google Play, and there's a great frontend called Gamesome that works brilliantly for organizing in a Kodi-like atmosphere (not unlike LaunchBox on the PC, which I can also endorse highly).

JUST USE WHAT YOU HAVE.
 
2017-04-18 12:58:05 PM  

Dimensio: Tyrone Slothrop: Good thing, since Nintendo evidently has stopped making them. Apparently they're allergic to money.

I have proposed the hypothesis that someone high-up at Nintendo is involved in a "Brewster's Millions" type of situation where they must completely bankrupt the company in order to inherit a fortune even larger than Nintendo's current net worth.


Nope. That's not it at all.

The NES Classic was an ad campaign. They released it prior to the holiday season with a goal: Keep the Nintendo name in people's minds during the holidays. It was out there to remind you of your nostalgic love for Nintendo, and to remind you that Nintendo is still making consoles. Instead of using a vast TV and print ad campaign to do this, they shat out a bunch of cheap emulator consoles, did a limited release (to build hype, as usual for Nintendo), and relied on social media to do the advertising for them.

The NES Classic was just a commercial that people paid $60 a pop to check out. Once the Switch was launched, the "hey, member Nintendo?" ad campaign was over and they stopped producing the Classic.

That's all there is to it. It's no deep conspiracy or anything. It was a marketing ploy that kept people aware and waiting for the next Nintendo console release. Job done. Production ended.
 
2017-04-18 01:04:08 PM  
I have like 5000 NES, Super NES, and Atari games installed on my modded 1st generation Xbox.

I also have them on my phone.  Yeah... i'm not going to be playing Super Mario 3 on my phone, but the TETRIS experience is pretty much just what i'd want.
 
2017-04-18 01:10:55 PM  

Kuroshin: Anybody able to speak to the NES Classic's output quality vs. Pi3?  Scuttlebutt was that the NESC had the best overall output quality for NES titles when compared to contemporary emulators, but I'm taking that with a massive grain of salt.  Sure, Nintendo should have the easiest time building a full NES emulator on the smallest processing footprint, but fanboys being what they are...

Also, where does the Pi3 show its limit?  NeoGeo?  PSX?  N64?  What system would be the "highest possible" to emulate fully?  Is it capable of running MAME with recent arcade ROMs without choking to death on sprite load?  Trying to decide if it's worth picking up a Pi3 to power an AIO arcade cab, or if I should wait for another hardware revision...


My buddy was complaining about not being able to find the NES Classic for his 10 year old so I told him I would try to build him one. Since then, I've built 15 for family and friends and counting. It's become a nice little side job, a pain in the rear side job but hey, what can you do. The bad part is I haven't had time to play the one I built for myself. I'm also in the process of building solar screens and painting around the house.

Atari 2600, 7800 and Lynx: just about all games work. Every now and again I'll run across one that doesn't but it could just be a bad rom.

Atari 5200: the emulator is based on Atari 800 so you have to jump through hoops to get it to work. I haven't had time to play around with it.

Colecovision and Intellivision need keyboards (or so I've read). I haven't played around with those yet.

NES, SNES, GB, GBA, GBC and even GB Virtual all work

N64: Some games do work, some struggle and some don't run at all. I can't link it now, but if you search 'N64 working games retropie" there is a wiki that list them. I would suggest not playing them unless you have a N64 controller because of that 'Z' button. If that trigger plays a big role in the game (Zelda for example) then it's almost impossible to play with a regular controller. I read the new N64 controllers you can buy suck so I use my original controller and an adapter I bought from some company in Canada that converts it to USB. I can send you the link when I get home if you can't find it by searching.

PSP: Games are a no go. Most of the ones I've tried won't even boot but a few will. Those that run are super choppy and slow which makes them unplayable but I've only tried a few.

Sega Saturn: No

All Sega's up to Saturn work fine.

A lot of old DOS based games work fine with a wireless keyboard and track pad. Games I have on mine are the Phantamagoria and Gabriel Knight series, several of the Leisure Suit Larry games a few others like Harvester. I haven't had the time to add more or play around with them too much.

Doom and a couple other FPS'ers are actually in Retropie, you just have to download them.

PS1: Some/most games work fine. A few of mine will freeze before you can play. (Techmo Super Bowl is one). I think there is a working wiki on games for PS1 as well.

For friends/family, I built one like the article where everything is stored on a micro SD card. For my personal one, I have Retropie on the card but everything else is loaded on a 1TB Western Digital external hard drive (that I'm going to replace with a bigger on soon) and the drive is powered by the Pi USB port. There is a script you run to have the Pi read both. 

With art work and everything, those cards fill up quickly.
 
2017-04-18 01:18:07 PM  

WilderKWight: I don't get the point. You have a computer. You have a cell phone. You probably have a tablet. WHY get another entire device just to emulate games? All of these devices have more than enough power to emulate NES, SNES, Genesis, TG-16, Master System, and several other consoles. The emulators for PC are far more versatile and are already made to scale for your television. Your PC has USB ports and probably has Bluetooth as well, so controllers are no problem.

I just don't see why anyone would spend extra for a little Pi device when they have tech laying around that can already do this. Heck, most people have an old smartphone around at this point, and even one from a few years ago is more than powerful enough to be turned into an emulator console. All the emulators are on Google Play, and there's a great frontend called Gamesome that works brilliantly for organizing in a Kodi-like atmosphere (not unlike LaunchBox on the PC, which I can also endorse highly).

JUST USE WHAT YOU HAVE.



Not everybody has any of those devices hooked up to their TV in their living room.  I'm the first guy to argue with the people who say they hate PC gaming because they don't want to sit in front of a monitor, and use my own setup as an example of why the argument of couch gaming being a console-only practice is asinine.  However, not everybody has a gaming-dedicated PC, which means they need to buy new boxen just to have something attached via HDMI (they aren't going to move their office work computer into their living room just to make you and I happy).  Instead of buying a small desktop or a mid-range laptop to tuck into the entertainment center, the NES Classic allows them the absolute best emulator for those 30 games available (from what I'm reading, it beats every other emulator out there for accuracy, quality and sound).  On top of that, the NESC can be hacked in minutes to play every NES ROM (and others, if I'm reading things right), plus give you a slick UI for it all.

For people who weren't around to hoard their old games, people who don't have gobs of money for original carts, or a spare system to toss in front of the couch, there's nothing wrong with the NESC.

/massive gaming rig attached to TV, RetroArch on all my Android devices, a brazillian wireless controllers and a dedicated retro game room in my house
//not about to shiat on others who aren't willing to drop the price of a small car on what I've put together
///too bad the NESC is dead
 
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