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(Good.is)   That stench you smell is coming from Odessa, Texas. Good thing there was a massive tire fire to cover it up   ( good.is) divider line
    More: Scary, West Odessa Volunteer, Ector County, Texas, Firefighter, team OA Online, EPA deploys teams, Chief Jimmy Ellis, especially dangerous combination, United States Environmental Protection Agency  
•       •       •

3902 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Apr 2017 at 3:46 PM (26 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



44 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-04-18 09:59:08 AM  
"Were it not for the EPA's involvement in Odessa, the fire would almost certainly rage on until the fuel had been consumed, likely for days or even weeks. "

And what did they do? Nothing in TFA about that although lots about what the locals didn't do.

I like the EPA but if this article is supposed to be an endorsement of their wonderfulness, it's up in smoke.
 
2017-04-18 10:28:53 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-04-18 12:14:01 PM  
All of west Texas is a shiathole..... news at 11.
 
2017-04-18 01:01:12 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-04-18 03:53:12 PM  
Texas being it's own stereotype.

Don't try to defend your state.

It's not worth it.
 
2017-04-18 03:54:48 PM  

blatz514: [img.fark.net image 512x384]


Came for this. Leaving satisfied.
 
2017-04-18 03:55:00 PM  
s2.quickmeme.com
 
2017-04-18 03:58:32 PM  

edmo: "Were it not for the EPA's involvement in Odessa, the fire would almost certainly rage on until the fuel had been consumed, likely for days or even weeks. "

And what did they do? Nothing in TFA about that although lots about what the locals didn't do.

I like the EPA but if this article is supposed to be an endorsement of their wonderfulness, it's up in smoke.


But, the article says they had a plan and went to work.

(though they did not specify what that work was)
(I assume it was eating donuts and drinking coffee while watching the fire)
 
2017-04-18 03:59:47 PM  
Isn't all that used rubber worth something more than fuel for Satan's campfire?
 
2017-04-18 04:00:35 PM  

mrsleep: edmo: "Were it not for the EPA's involvement in Odessa, the fire would almost certainly rage on until the fuel had been consumed, likely for days or even weeks. "

And what did they do? Nothing in TFA about that although lots about what the locals didn't do.

I like the EPA but if this article is supposed to be an endorsement of their wonderfulness, it's up in smoke.

But, the article says they had a plan and went to work.

(though they did not specify what that work was)
(I assume it was eating donuts and drinking coffee while watching the fire)


They have the marshmallows. Just waiting on the hershey bars and graham crakers now.
 
2017-04-18 04:01:32 PM  

edmo: "Were it not for the EPA's involvement in Odessa, the fire would almost certainly rage on until the fuel had been consumed, likely for days or even weeks. "

And what did they do? Nothing in TFA about that although lots about what the locals didn't do.

I like the EPA but if this article is supposed to be an endorsement of their wonderfulness, it's up in smoke.


They smothered the fire under a huge pile of taxpayer dollars. Sure, they could have used sand, but the taxpayer cash was just sitting there, begging to be used.
 
2017-04-18 04:03:23 PM  
Midland/Odessa smells bad anyway....they must have been tipped off by the smoke.
 
2017-04-18 04:07:00 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-04-18 04:08:08 PM  
Well, you see tire recycling and proper disposal is for them librul commie hippies! Ain't no one gonna come here and well me wat I kin and kaint do on MY land!

/yeehaw?
 
2017-04-18 04:10:46 PM  

mrsleep: edmo: "Were it not for the EPA's involvement in Odessa, the fire would almost certainly rage on until the fuel had been consumed, likely for days or even weeks. "

And what did they do? Nothing in TFA about that although lots about what the locals didn't do.

I like the EPA but if this article is supposed to be an endorsement of their wonderfulness, it's up in smoke.

But, the article says they had a plan and went to work.

(though they did not specify what that work was)
(I assume it was eating donuts and drinking coffee while watching the fire)


Non-snark I just assumed their plan was to reimburse the local response.
Good federal government should be the Feds coming in, seeing they are not needed, leaving and picking up the bill for the people who did the real work.

You know like "crisis managers" do on a regular basis in actual corporate America.
 
2017-04-18 04:16:22 PM  

Bowen: [img.fark.net image 644x383]


And we're done here.  Unless they didn't get the stuff underground.
 
2017-04-18 04:18:02 PM  

Explodo: Midland/Odessa smells bad anyway....they must have been tipped off by the smoke.


No shiat. The first hint of that smell lets me know I'm getting close when I make the drive from Alpine. I usually notice it around Monahans.

/Would rather go to El Paso but I really hate driving on 90 past Marfa
//Valentine is some Silent Hill looking shiat at night
 
2017-04-18 04:18:45 PM  
media.giphy.com
 
2017-04-18 04:19:55 PM  
Did they save the cheerleader?
 
2017-04-18 04:25:13 PM  

Splinthar: mrsleep: edmo: "Were it not for the EPA's involvement in Odessa, the fire would almost certainly rage on until the fuel had been consumed, likely for days or even weeks. "

And what did they do? Nothing in TFA about that although lots about what the locals didn't do.

I like the EPA but if this article is supposed to be an endorsement of their wonderfulness, it's up in smoke.

But, the article says they had a plan and went to work.

(though they did not specify what that work was)
(I assume it was eating donuts and drinking coffee while watching the fire)

Non-snark I just assumed their plan was to reimburse the local response.
Good federal government should be the Feds coming in, seeing they are not needed, leaving and picking up the bill for the people who did the real work.

You know like "crisis managers" do on a regular basis in actual corporate America.


Why should the Feds pick up the tab?
 
2017-04-18 04:33:07 PM  
Never mind that...how's spring ball going?
 
2017-04-18 04:37:55 PM  

edmo: "Were it not for the EPA's involvement in Odessa, the fire would almost certainly rage on until the fuel had been consumed, likely for days or even weeks. "

And what did they do? Nothing in TFA about that although lots about what the locals didn't do.

I like the EPA but if this article is supposed to be an endorsement of their wonderfulness, it's up in smoke.



Based on the other articles on the subject, covered it up with dirt.
http://www.kwtx.com/content/news/Nearly-week-long-Texas-tire-fire-fin​a​lly-out-419622703.html
 
2017-04-18 04:44:37 PM  

Cdr.Murdock: Isn't all that used rubber worth something more than fuel for Satan's campfire?


Nope.  The best thing to do with used tires is stockpile them until it's worth it to shred them for the steel, and then burn the rubber bits in coal fired powerplants or other coal fired boilers.

Same this with waste oil, the most enviornmentally responsible way to dispose of it is to burn it HOT in a controlled combustion, like an oil fired furnace.
 
2017-04-18 04:52:39 PM  
I was looking around for the bulldozers every dump that I know of has -- and didn't see any. If the fire was caught early enough -- which the huge plume of black smoke should have been a giveaway -- they could have scraped away enough unburned tires to make a fire break, then scraped in piles of dirt to attempt to quell what fire they could.

When I was a kid, the local dump used to periodically burn heaps of tires and you could see the smoke -- and smell it -- for miles. Then that stopped and they just piled up, though the recapping industry took a lot of tires which were worth reworking. Then the next city installed a tire shredder -- churning out thousands of pounds a day of rubber chunks, which were turned into rubber pellets and shipped out to be used for other things. The steel wires in the tires were salvaged and sent off with scrap steel and iron.

That kind of solved our major tire problems then.

I haven't seen a huge heap of old tires in decades in a dump.

I guess this place couldn't afford a tire shredder.
 
2017-04-18 04:53:55 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-04-18 04:56:10 PM  

KingBiefWhistle: Explodo: Midland/Odessa smells bad anyway....they must have been tipped off by the smoke.

No shiat. The first hint of that smell lets me know I'm getting close when I make the drive from Alpine. I usually notice it around Monahans.

/Would rather go to El Paso but I really hate driving on 90 past Marfa
//Valentine is some Silent Hill looking shiat at night


Never smelled when I was there but maybe that's changed with all the fracking.

Now the local *water* - well there's something special.  Tastes and feels like mineral oil.
 
2017-04-18 05:21:28 PM  
Oh, dessa good one subby!
 
2017-04-18 05:27:19 PM  
"but as you can see, the smoke and toxic particulate remain in the city's air"

No, that's just what we call any day that ends in "y". The stench is from unwashed Tex-Mexican hobos camped in the cacti in Midland, and the refinery stench from Odessa mixing with the uncontrolled H2S output from a hundred million leaky production & capped wells. People like "Rooster" McConaughey call that the smell of money, but it's just the Stink of Death.

Literally no one here gave a half shiat about that tire fire so long as the 50 MPH winds blew it away from us, but there are so many places from Odessa to Andrews where the air is so unbreathable I don't see how anyone could tell the difference anyway.
 
2017-04-18 06:05:16 PM  

KingBiefWhistle: Explodo: Midland/Odessa smells bad anyway....they must have been tipped off by the smoke.

No shiat. The first hint of that smell lets me know I'm getting close when I make the drive from Alpine. I usually notice it around Monahans.

/Would rather go to El Paso but I really hate driving on 90 past Marfa
//Valentine is some Silent Hill looking shiat at night


I love that area, my wife and i got married in Marathon and try to go as much as possible (live in Dallas). Midland/Odessa is about the bleakest part of the state and the worst part of the drive.
 
2017-04-18 06:06:21 PM  

sethen320: max_pooper: Splinthar: mrsleep: edmo: "Were it not for the EPA's involvement in Odessa, the fire would almost certainly rage on until the fuel had been consumed, likely for days or even weeks. "

And what did they do? Nothing in TFA about that although lots about what the locals didn't do.

I like the EPA but if this article is supposed to be an endorsement of their wonderfulness, it's up in smoke.

But, the article says they had a plan and went to work.

(though they did not specify what that work was)
(I assume it was eating donuts and drinking coffee while watching the fire)

Non-snark I just assumed their plan was to reimburse the local response.
Good federal government should be the Feds coming in, seeing they are not needed, leaving and picking up the bill for the people who did the real work.

You know like "crisis managers" do on a regular basis in actual corporate America.

Why should the Feds pick up the tab?

Thank you.  I was kind of wondering that myself.


Because nobody seems to know who the owner is?
 
2017-04-18 06:49:15 PM  

chasd00: Midland/Odessa is about the bleakest part of the state and the worst part of the drive


I-20 in general is one of the longest and most boring routes I have driven in the US. One of the few interesting things I can remember about the drive was, as a fan of the 70s folk rock duo England Dan and John Ford Coley, learning that there really is a Dowdy Ferry Road!

I do remember a peculiar unpleasant odor when driving through Odessa/Midland - reminded me of the bilges in the ship I was on in the Navy...
 
2017-04-18 07:41:31 PM  
How am I not surprised that this happened in west Odessa? West Odessa is to Odessa/Midland as Odessa/Midland is to the rest of the state. My parents used to own some land in west of town, complete with a trailer (from before they got their shiat all the way together and got a house in a decent part of town). A few years ago they had to sell it because the tenants kept letting it go to shiat, and there was probably an abandoned meth lab in there at some point. Then there's the fact that the oil boom brought in too many people for the housing, followed by oil prices dropping resulting in a lot of people broke and stuck in Odessa when they couldn't afford to leave (having spent too much on inflated housing... and strippers).

The area can be really pretty around sunset. The best thing about the long drive on I-20 when I was in college were some of the middle of nowhere spots that looked like a great painting when you hit them at just the right time.

/Odessa native
//Moved the hell away from Odessa as soon as possible
///Finally settled in Dallas
 
2017-04-18 08:06:27 PM  
Why not just use fire trucks and water?  

The tires weren't stacked very deep at all.
 
2017-04-18 08:55:39 PM  

Explodo: Midland/Odessa smells bad anyway....they must have been tipped off by the smoke.


Midland is the birthplace of Laura Bush, so they've got that going for them.
 
2017-04-18 08:59:32 PM  
img.fark.net

West Texas is nothing but thousands of miles of road with plastic bags stuck on the brush on either side as far as you can see. If that were ever to catch fire, God help us all...
 
2017-04-18 09:02:52 PM  
"Welcome to Odessa, named for a Ukrainian city I guarantee you 99% of the folks in this city could not identify on a globe."
 
2017-04-18 09:09:52 PM  
KingBiefWhistle:No shiat. The first hint of that smell lets me know I'm getting close when I make the drive from Alpine.

I used to do some work there. I always knew I was getting close when the air started to reek like hot tar.
 
2017-04-18 09:12:10 PM  

edmo: "Were it not for the EPA's involvement in Odessa, the fire would almost certainly rage on until the fuel had been consumed, likely for days or even weeks. "

And what did they do? Nothing in TFA about that although lots about what the locals didn't do.

I like the EPA but if this article is supposed to be an endorsement of their wonderfulness, it's up in smoke.


It would appear by the video that there's only about an hour at most of fuel left to burn.  Tires burn fast.  EPA did nothing
 
2017-04-18 09:17:45 PM  

Thingster: Cdr.Murdock: Isn't all that used rubber worth something more than fuel for Satan's campfire?

Nope.  The best thing to do with used tires is stockpile them until it's worth it to shred them for the steel, and then burn the rubber bits in coal fired powerplants or other coal fired boilers.

Same this with waste oil, the most enviornmentally responsible way to dispose of it is to burn it HOT in a controlled combustion, like an oil fired furnace.


Absolutely true.  Remember a coal burning power plant near where I grew up doing this.  Their basic claim was that adding shredded tires to the coal caused it to burn hotter and improved the burn/reduced pollution.  You sure couldn't tell by the video here that this would be true, but a power plant is a closed system which acts a lot differently.

Once growing up, the neighbor farmer apparently got paid by some outfit to let them dump several semi-loads of tires onto the property and light it on fire.  Must have been 10 semi-loads.  Half mile from our house.  That thing looked insane...worse than this video.  He was reported and fined but pretty certain a) nobody did any time in jail and b) still financially a good deal for both the landowner and the tire people.  Fines just not big enough to matter at that scale.
 
2017-04-18 10:07:45 PM  
I just know the guy fly that drone was wanting to fly threw that smoke.
 
2017-04-18 10:38:33 PM  

rev.love_revolver: [img.fark.net image 246x277]

West Texas is nothing but thousands of miles of road with plastic bags stuck on the brush on either side as far as you can see. If that were ever to catch fire, God help us all...


That reminds me of Baja California decades ago when I drove to Cabo San Lucas. You knew you were approaching a town (and to some degree, the size) about 10-20 miles out, because there was liter and specifically plastic bags hung up on everything, just like your picture. The larger the town, the greater the diameter of this effect, but we were never able to accurately calibrate it (too many variables).
Inevitably just a few miles out there would be a makeshift dump, often with random smoldering piles of whatever. We termed this litter and dumping area "the outer sheit flats".
From your picture, Texas looks like an outer sheit flat.
 
2017-04-18 11:11:42 PM  
If only there wasn't some way we could drop water from the air.
 
2017-04-18 11:47:36 PM  
Judging by the first paragraph, this publication's editing department is the location of another tire fire.
 
2017-04-19 02:33:08 PM  

Truck Fump: sethen320: max_pooper: Splinthar: mrsleep: edmo: "Were it not for the EPA's involvement in Odessa, the fire would almost certainly rage on until the fuel had been consumed, likely for days or even weeks. "

And what did they do? Nothing in TFA about that although lots about what the locals didn't do.

I like the EPA but if this article is supposed to be an endorsement of their wonderfulness, it's up in smoke.

But, the article says they had a plan and went to work.

(though they did not specify what that work was)
(I assume it was eating donuts and drinking coffee while watching the fire)

Non-snark I just assumed their plan was to reimburse the local response.
Good federal government should be the Feds coming in, seeing they are not needed, leaving and picking up the bill for the people who did the real work.

You know like "crisis managers" do on a regular basis in actual corporate America.

Why should the Feds pick up the tab?

Thank you.  I was kind of wondering that myself.

Because nobody seems to know who the owner is?


Exactly these agencies FEMA, EPA, NTSB are designed to deal with the problem first and then worry about expendatures and financing later.
Once culpability is proven then fines and fees can be levied or it gets absorbed into the budget.

Its called harm reduction, and its the point of insurance and other long term thinking all stemming from the following logic: "Not fixing a problem will cost us more in the long run than fixing it."
 
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