Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Some Woundwort)   Because nothing says "Happy Easter" like sitting down as a family and watching that timeless classic "Watership Down" with all the cute little bunnies... OHMYGOD   ( ladbible.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, WWII veteran Richard, Watership Down, Creme Egg, Easter Sunday, Bright eyes, young children, human intervention, new colony  
•       •       •

10345 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Apr 2017 at 2:20 PM (39 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



129 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2017-04-17 09:44:26 AM  
Tell the whiners to silflay hraka. It's a good movie.
 
2017-04-17 09:55:55 AM  
Just think. If it wasn't for Twitter, we'd never get to hear about all this unimaginable trauma experienced by the innocent. Hopefully at least some of them got good reaction videos of their children, like people were doing for that Red Wedding scene in Game of Thrones.
 
2017-04-17 10:19:07 AM  

Boojum2k: Tell the whiners to silflay hraka. It's a good movie.


Delicate flowers are too easily triggered. They're missing the whole point of the story.

It's just as well they don't watch it or read the book. It'd be wasted on them.
 
2017-04-17 10:22:22 AM  

Boojum2k: Tell the whiners to silflay hraka. It's a good movie.


I came here to defend the novel and movie, thinking I might also say something witty and pithy. You, sir, beat me to it in spectacular fashion.
 
2017-04-17 10:38:47 AM  
What about the rabbit who would compose poems about the snare.
 
2017-04-17 11:19:57 AM  
My husband and I were up very early yesterday morning.  There was nothing worth watching on our cable TV system, so I opened up the UK TV listings and saw "Watership Down" was about to be airing on Channel Five at 6:45 AM our time.  So, I fired up my WiDi enabled tablet with dock, mirrored the screen over to the TV set and opened up my link for UK TV watching.  I then selected Channel Five and told my husband we were watching a bunny movie for Easter.

I did not realize he had never read or saw "Watership Down" before that.  He now understands why I call my car the "Fairy Wogdog" (original plates had W0G on it) and the origins of my "Frith on a ..." exclamations in place of a more common variation.  He enjoyed the film, and mentioned over breakfast "If that's your idea of a proper Easter film, you're really twisted."

My brother looked over at him.  "If you're just figuring that out about her after 12 years, you're not terribly observant, are you?"
 
2017-04-17 11:46:18 AM  
Meh. Should have just put on "Bambi".
 
2017-04-17 12:19:33 PM  
I really look forward to this happening every Easter. Great Book and movie.
 
2017-04-17 12:50:07 PM  
It's amazing that after nearly 20 years of South Park and 30 years of The Simpsons, not to mention earlier works like "Heavy Metal" or "Akira", that there are still people out there who think "It's a cartoon, so of course it's fine to watch with my little kids."
 
2017-04-17 01:16:09 PM  
Hey, what's on after this movie?   Oh, a doggy movie!  Good boy, Old Yeller!
 
2017-04-17 01:59:18 PM  

jake_lex: It's amazing that after nearly 20 years of South Park and 30 years of The Simpsons, not to mention earlier works like "Heavy Metal" or "Akira", that there are still people out there who think "It's a cartoon, so of course it's fine to watch with my little kids."


Yup.  Animated films with mature themes are nothing new.  Wizards, The Plague Dogs, Fritz the Cat, Felidae, When the Wind Blows, and countless others are just not appropriate for younger audiences.

And even films for kids can come with proper viewing ages.  The Secret of NIMH, The Iron Giant, and The Dark Crystal are probably best for kids between 6 and 12.  Setting aside the possible nightmare fuel aspect, the plots of those films are just a little too advanced for the little ones to really enjoy.

On that aspect, one thing that irked me about the last few Harry Potter movies were all of the parents who brought their little kids to see it.  The tone and plot became darker and more complex as the series progressed as it was assumed that the reader would grow up as it unfolded.  Looking around, I saw a lot of scared little 4- and 5-year-olds during Deathly Hallows.  But hey, its Harry Potter!
 
2017-04-17 02:21:24 PM  
awesome book, awesome movie
 
2017-04-17 02:27:19 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

Other suggestions
 
2017-04-17 02:29:06 PM  

OtherLittleGuy: Meh. Should have just put on "Bambi".


versus Godzilla.

/FTFM
 
2017-04-17 02:30:46 PM  

blatz514: Hey, what's on after this movie?   Oh, a doggy movie!  Good boy, Old Yeller!


Oooh, Cujo!
 
2017-04-17 02:30:53 PM  

Dinjiin: jake_lex: It's amazing that after nearly 20 years of South Park and 30 years of The Simpsons, not to mention earlier works like "Heavy Metal" or "Akira", that there are still people out there who think "It's a cartoon, so of course it's fine to watch with my little kids."

Yup.  Animated films with mature themes are nothing new.  Wizards, The Plague Dogs, Fritz the Cat, Felidae, When the Wind Blows, and countless others are just not appropriate for younger audiences.

And even films for kids can come with proper viewing ages.  The Secret of NIMH, The Iron Giant, and The Dark Crystal are probably best for kids between 6 and 12.  Setting aside the possible nightmare fuel aspect, the plots of those films are just a little too advanced for the little ones to really enjoy.

On that aspect, one thing that irked me about the last few Harry Potter movies were all of the parents who brought their little kids to see it.  The tone and plot became darker and more complex as the series progressed as it was assumed that the reader would grow up as it unfolded.  Looking around, I saw a lot of scared little 4- and 5-year-olds during Deathly Hallows.  But hey, its Harry Potter!


Motherfark the end of Wizards has the farking BEST ending to a Wizard Duel I have ever, ever seen.
 
2017-04-17 02:32:41 PM  
It still surprises me in this day and age of the cyber that parents glance at this flick and think "hey bunnies! The kids'll love this!"

Might as well show them "Night of the Lepus". It's much funnier.
 
2017-04-17 02:32:48 PM  
cdn77.sadanduseless.comView Full Size
 
2017-04-17 02:33:41 PM  
I live less than 10 miles away from Watership Down & I love the fact that all the locations are (or were) real places.

Good story..
 
2017-04-17 02:34:27 PM  

Boojum2k: Tell the whiners to silflay hraka. It's a good movie.


Done in one. Last one out shut the lights.
 
2017-04-17 02:39:03 PM  

Boojum2k: Tell the whiners to silflay hraka. It's a good movie.


I have fond memories of having to read Watership Down in middle school. We had a great deal of fun using rabbit curses in polite conversation and during other classes. Perhaps my first encounter with the usefulness of an extended vocabulary for insulting someone to their face without them knowing.
 
2017-04-17 02:40:23 PM  
But but its about Bunnies.
 
2017-04-17 02:41:07 PM  

jake_lex: It's amazing that after nearly 20 years of South Park and 30 years of The Simpsons, not to mention earlier works like "Heavy Metal" or "Akira", that there are still people out there who think "It's a cartoon, so of course it's fine to watch with my little kids."


billsmovieemporium.files.wordpress.comView Full Size


...would like to have a word with those folks.
 
2017-04-17 02:41:15 PM  
When the kiddies are done with Watership Down, have them read his other book Maia.

JK!  It's total incest / bondage pr0n.

*fap*
 
2017-04-17 02:42:01 PM  

MrBallou: Boojum2k: Tell the whiners to silflay hraka. It's a good movie.

Delicate flowers are too easily triggered. They're missing the whole point of the story.

It's just as well they don't watch it or read the book. It'd be wasted on them.


The irony of seeing this on a Bible site - y'know, constructed by folks who put the people who actually celebrated Eostre to the goddamned sword for their heathen, un-Godly ways - is farking amusing.
 
2017-04-17 02:42:13 PM  
Reminds me of an Easter morning when I was 7... we went outside to find our cat with a baby bunny dangling from her mouth. I immediately told my sisters: " There goes the Easter bunny"
 
2017-04-17 02:43:11 PM  
Hey...I watched this movie as a kid, and I turned out completely normal...

/except for...
//Oh, and that one time I...
//Nvrmnd
 
2017-04-17 02:43:37 PM  

give me doughnuts: jake_lex: It's amazing that after nearly 20 years of South Park and 30 years of The Simpsons, not to mention earlier works like "Heavy Metal" or "Akira", that there are still people out there who think "It's a cartoon, so of course it's fine to watch with my little kids."

[billsmovieemporium.files.wordpress.com image 456x348]

...would like to have a word with those folks.


You're talking about folks who petitioned to have a PG-13 version of Deadpool produced. They don't get it.
 
2017-04-17 02:44:28 PM  

blatz514: Hey, what's on after this movie?   Oh, a doggy movie!  Good boy, Old Yeller!


"Oh god, that's depressing. What about after that?"
"Futurama."
"Oh thank god."
"It's the one where the dog waits all his life for Fry to come back."
"Dammit."
 
2017-04-17 02:45:06 PM  
When I was in Nuclear Power School, NTC Orlando served rabbit on Easter.
 
2017-04-17 02:50:27 PM  
Oh, embleer Frith!
 
2017-04-17 02:51:17 PM  
Dogs aren't dangerous, believe me, many people are saying that.
 
2017-04-17 02:51:25 PM  

Bermuda59: When I was in Nuclear Power School, NTC Orlando served rabbit on Easter.



The butcher shop in a local grocery store had a special on rabbit this weekend.
 
2017-04-17 02:51:26 PM  
I've watched this movie at least Hrair times.
 
2017-04-17 02:51:49 PM  
In 1966 I was attending the U. S. Navy's sonar school in Key West, Florida. It was Easter and the mess hall served rabbit. It was also family day and the place was filled with wives and kids. As I stood in line I read the menu, saw the featured meal was rabbit and wanted to shout, "OMG, we're eating the Easter bunny."

I didn't; I was worried about repercussions. It was the first time I'd eaten rabbit . . . delicious.
 
2017-04-17 02:54:12 PM  
Bright eyyyyyyes...shiiiiiiining like fire....
 
2017-04-17 03:00:17 PM  

Praise Cheesus: I call my car the "Fairy Wogdog" (original plates had W0G on it)


I have a friend with the plates [HRUDUDU] on his car.
 
2017-04-17 03:01:51 PM  

Dinjiin: jake_lex: It's amazing that after nearly 20 years of South Park and 30 years of The Simpsons, not to mention earlier works like "Heavy Metal" or "Akira", that there are still people out there who think "It's a cartoon, so of course it's fine to watch with my little kids."

Yup.  Animated films with mature themes are nothing new.  Wizards, The Plague Dogs, Fritz the Cat, Felidae, When the Wind Blows, and countless others are just not appropriate for younger audiences.

And even films for kids can come with proper viewing ages.  The Secret of NIMH, The Iron Giant, and The Dark Crystal are probably best for kids between 6 and 12.  Setting aside the possible nightmare fuel aspect, the plots of those films are just a little too advanced for the little ones to really enjoy.

On that aspect, one thing that irked me about the last few Harry Potter movies were all of the parents who brought their little kids to see it.  The tone and plot became darker and more complex as the series progressed as it was assumed that the reader would grow up as it unfolded.  Looking around, I saw a lot of scared little 4- and 5-year-olds during Deathly Hallows.  But hey, its Harry Potter!


I miss the days before they ran children's movies past a team of child psychologists before letting kids see. They are stronger than we believe.

Why does the light that burned so brightly, suddenly burn so pale?
 
2017-04-17 03:12:13 PM  

HammerHeadSnark: In 1966 I was attending the U. S. Navy's sonar school in Key West, Florida. It was Easter and the mess hall served rabbit. It was also family day and the place was filled with wives and kids. As I stood in line I read the menu, saw the featured meal was rabbit and wanted to shout, "OMG, we're eating the Easter bunny."

I didn't; I was worried about repercussions. It was the first time I'd eaten rabbit . . . delicious.


My grandfather used to make dry cured venison salami and jerky, then give most away as Yule gifts for friends.  Every year, the hand printed ingredients label listed the random name of one of Santa's reindeer at the top, followed by the seasonings.
 
2017-04-17 03:12:46 PM  
They should have shown "The Plague Dogs" instead.
 
2017-04-17 03:13:45 PM  
I saw that movie so long ago that I barely remember the specifics.  But I remember the animation, and the visuals.  I remember the voices.  I remember some of the scenes with the violence.  And I remember the sadness.

Reading a quick synopsis on Wikipedia brought it all back.

Yep...  That's a helluva a story.
One that I don't think I could bare to watch again.  It's just too sad.
 
2017-04-17 03:14:43 PM  

give me doughnuts: Bermuda59: When I was in Nuclear Power School, NTC Orlando served rabbit on Easter.


The butcher shop in a local grocery store had a special on rabbit this weekend.


Watership Down- You've read the book, you've seen the movie, now eat the cast!
 
2017-04-17 03:17:18 PM  
More like Watership Downer...
 
2017-04-17 03:19:53 PM  

Fano: I miss the days before they ran children's movies past a team of child psychologists before letting kids see. They are stronger than we believe.

Why does the light that burned so brightly, suddenly burn so pale?


I miss the days when child psychologists were realistic, in that they knew painful lessons had to be learned in childhood for aware, responsible adults to form. And those lessons are better learned through shared fictions than through actual personal trauma.

Like, just look at this thread. All kinds of potential traumatic concepts, but this thread is full of people who have a language for those concepts, and ways of dealing with them that they can share.

The end of childhood began with Teletubbies, to exact opposite of good storytelling. Promulgated by a new generation of child psychology.

HRUDUDU vs. The Nunu would be an excellent movie, five stars, would watch again.
 
d23 [BareFark]
2017-04-17 03:21:55 PM  
Next year Night of the Lepus rifftrax on easter.. I need to write that down.
 
2017-04-17 03:28:53 PM  

durbnpoisn: I saw that movie so long ago that I barely remember the specifics.  But I remember the animation, and the visuals.  I remember the voices.  I remember some of the scenes with the violence.  And I remember the sadness.

Reading a quick synopsis on Wikipedia brought it all back.

Yep...  That's a helluva a story.
One that I don't think I could bare to watch again.  It's just too sad.


Why do you need to be naked to watch it again?
 
2017-04-17 03:29:12 PM  

Bennie Crabtree:
I miss the days when child psychologists were realistic, in that they knew painful lessons had to be learned in childhood for aware, responsible adults to form. And those lessons are better learned through shared fictions than through actual personal trauma.


For hundreds if not thousands of years, children's stories have been mostly cautionary tales.

kid: "That story scared me."
parent: "Good. You should be scared. Life is scary, you little git. Get used to it."

See also:

http://www.aesopfables.com
 
2017-04-17 03:30:20 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: Fano: I miss the days before they ran children's movies past a team of child psychologists before letting kids see. They are stronger than we believe.

Why does the light that burned so brightly, suddenly burn so pale?

I miss the days when child psychologists were realistic, in that they knew painful lessons had to be learned in childhood for aware, responsible adults to form. And those lessons are better learned through shared fictions than through actual personal trauma.

Like, just look at this thread. All kinds of potential traumatic concepts, but this thread is full of people who have a language for those concepts, and ways of dealing with them that they can share.

The end of childhood began with Teletubbies, to exact opposite of good storytelling. Promulgated by a new generation of child psychology.

HRUDUDU vs. The Nunu would be an excellent movie, five stars, would watch again.


When my son was like 1 or 2, he loved Teletubbies.  But he also love Blue's Clues.  So there was a good tradeoff...
 
2017-04-17 03:31:45 PM  

st3n: I live less than 10 miles away from Watership Down & I love the fact that all the locations are (or were) real places.

Good story..



How does a 'real place' stop being real?
 
2017-04-17 03:32:26 PM  

Praise Cheesus: My grandfather used to make dry cured venison salami and jerky, then give most away as Yule gifts for friends. Every year, the hand printed ingredients label listed the random name of one of Santa's reindeer at the top, followed by the seasonings.


I think if I'd have met your grandfather I'd have found a kindred spirit. I also think I'd have preferred Prancer Pepperoni Stix.
 
Displayed 50 of 129 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report