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(CNN)   Texas warns residents about largest outbreak of mumps in over two decades. If only there were something, say a common vaccine, that could have prevented such an outbreak   ( cnn.com) divider line
    More: Murica, mumps, Measles, Van Deusen, cases, mumps cases, Johnson County, mumps virus, MMR vaccine  
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5196 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Apr 2017 at 11:40 AM (26 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2017-04-16 08:17:44 AM  
Subby: If only there was something, say a common vaccine, that could have prevented such an outbreak.

TFA: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.
 
2017-04-16 08:21:27 AM  
Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.
 
2017-04-16 09:03:44 AM  

backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.


This has nothing to do with failing vaccines and everything to do with dumbass anti-vaxers.
 
2017-04-16 09:04:43 AM  

backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.


You mean that a species is adapting to environmental pressures and passing on a favorable set of genetic conditions to future generations in an attempt to circumvent said pressures? That system sounds really intelligently designed.
 
2017-04-16 09:32:55 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-04-16 11:02:15 AM  
As this is Texas I'll need a second opinion to confirm said mumps aren't just subcutaneous gravy pockets.
 
2017-04-16 11:44:21 AM  
Oh look a new "outbreak" to get all worked up about. This happens every six months. Big farking deal.
 
2017-04-16 11:47:14 AM  

ZAZ: Subby: If only there was something, say a common vaccine, that could have prevented such an outbreak.

TFA: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.


Ain't nobody got time for reading no article.
 
2017-04-16 11:47:39 AM  

ZAZ: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.


backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.


All vaccines have a fail rate and have had one since their invention.  That fail rate is incredibly low, and if the rest of the population gets vaccinated, the people it doesn't work in get protected by herd immunity.  Herd immunity weakens when less people get vaccinated.  These outbreaks are absolutely due to lower vaccination rates.
 
2017-04-16 11:49:42 AM  

Rhaab: backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

This has nothing to do with failing vaccines and everything to do with dumbass anti-vaxers.


You should try reading TFA.
 
2017-04-16 11:50:10 AM  

lennavan: ZAZ: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.

backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

All vaccines have a fail rate and have had one since their invention.  That fail rate is incredibly low, and if the rest of the population gets vaccinated, the people it doesn't work in get protected by herd immunity.  Herd immunity weakens when less people get vaccinated.  These outbreaks are absolutely due to lower vaccination rates.


Yeah! What does the CDC know about disease anyway? Sounds like some big government nanny-state commie organization to me.
 
2017-04-16 11:52:36 AM  

Harry Wagstaff: You should try reading TFA.


Don't tell me how to live my life.

Back to bedm I have the mumps.
 
2017-04-16 11:53:34 AM  

Theaetetus: lennavan: ZAZ: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.

backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

All vaccines have a fail rate and have had one since their invention.  That fail rate is incredibly low, and if the rest of the population gets vaccinated, the people it doesn't work in get protected by herd immunity.  Herd immunity weakens when less people get vaccinated.  These outbreaks are absolutely due to lower vaccination rates.

Yeah! What does the CDC know about disease anyway? Sounds like some big government nanny-state commie organization to me.


I hope Trump kills the CDC budget. I saw what a waste of money that organization was on The Walking Dead.
 
2017-04-16 11:54:16 AM  

backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.


The mumps vaccine was never more than 85% effective.
 
2017-04-16 11:54:53 AM  
Lived in Houston for five years, there were always anti-vax little signs popping up in mediums and sidewalks.
 
2017-04-16 11:56:04 AM  

Satanic_Hamster: Lived in Houston for five years, there were always anti-vax little signs popping up in mediums and sidewalks.


People that claim they can speak to the dead were carrying signs?
 
2017-04-16 11:56:04 AM  
And by "mumps" they mean "high school football hazing that involves shoving things up unwilling butts".
 
2017-04-16 11:58:06 AM  
You would think that of all the states, Texas would be the one to understand the concept of "herd immunity". One of life's little ironies, I guess. Or Dharma.
 
2017-04-16 11:58:50 AM  

Harry Wagstaff: ZAZ: Subby: If only there was something, say a common vaccine, that could have prevented such an outbreak.

TFA: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.

Ain't nobody got time for reading no article.

Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps. However, high vaccination coverage helps limit the size, duration, and spread of mumps outbreaks.


Ain't nobody got time to go to the CDC website and read where that "journalist" got that little decontextualized factoid, apparently.
 
2017-04-16 11:59:13 AM  

BarkingUnicorn: backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

The mumps vaccine was never more than 85% effective.


85% of the time it works everytime.
 
2017-04-16 12:00:21 PM  
www.robertscottbell.com
 
2017-04-16 12:01:09 PM  

rzrwiresunrise: Harry Wagstaff: ZAZ: Subby: If only there was something, say a common vaccine, that could have prevented such an outbreak.

TFA: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.

Ain't nobody got time for reading no article.

Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps. However, high vaccination coverage helps limit the size, duration, and spread of mumps outbreaks.

Ain't nobody got time to go to the CDC website and read where that "journalist" got that little decontextualized factoid, apparently.


You don't consider 98% high coverage?
 
2017-04-16 12:01:21 PM  
Big Pharma senses a tiny trickle of escaping revenue and looked to Big Whore to sound the alarm.
 
2017-04-16 12:01:27 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-04-16 12:02:04 PM  

Satanic_Hamster: Lived in Houston for five years, there were always anti-vax little signs popping up in mediums and sidewalks.


I would like to pop a few signs up some mediums.

Thank you for the idea.
 
2017-04-16 12:03:05 PM  

Harry Wagstaff: ZAZ: Subby: If only there was something, say a common vaccine, that could have prevented such an outbreak.

TFA: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.

Ain't nobody got time for reading no article.


img.fark.net
 
2017-04-16 12:03:29 PM  

Rhaab: backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

This has nothing to do with failing vaccines and everything to do with dumbass anti-vaxers.


The 150 cases they mention from Johnson county came from Keene, a very small town dominated by Seventh Day Adventists. A family visited other 7th Day friends in Arkansas and brought back mumps, which they promptly spread to all the 7th Day folks there. The"college" they speak of is a 7th day thing
 
2017-04-16 12:03:46 PM  
I know, i know. Satanic Hamster meant "medians" in the highway sense.

But popping a few anti-vax little signs up in mediums is way more in the spirit of Fark.
 
2017-04-16 12:05:09 PM  

happydude45: Rhaab: backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

This has nothing to do with failing vaccines and everything to do with dumbass anti-vaxers.

The 150 cases they mention from Johnson county came from Keene, a very small town dominated by Seventh Day Adventists. A family visited other 7th Day friends in Arkansas and brought back mumps, which they promptly spread to all the 7th Day folks there. The"college" they speak of is a 7th day thing


it is the seventh day, yo.
 
2017-04-16 12:06:17 PM  

meat0918: [img.fark.net image 425x281]


Candy corn peeps? I thought they were Madeleines for a moment. Drat, from Proust to Candy Corn in under three seconds. Now that's what I call deceleration.

You can see why I might have thought they were Madeleines:

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2017-04-16 12:07:16 PM  
Great. Now I want Madeleines with my tea on the one day of the year when it may be impossible to get any.
 
2017-04-16 12:07:41 PM  
I'm an evil person, because I'm waiting for an outbreak of mumps and measles at a school for autistic children
 
2017-04-16 12:08:52 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

The mumps vaccine was never more than 85% effective.


From the other thread: you dont get to that level until after all 3 doses

Most of the infected kids only have had 1-2 MMR boosters which put them around 70%

Also the outbreak started on south padre island which is on the border with mexico so there is a lot of international traffic
 
2017-04-16 12:10:28 PM  

Harry Wagstaff: Rhaab: backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

This has nothing to do with failing vaccines and everything to do with dumbass anti-vaxers.

You should try reading TFA.


I can't deal with CNN autoplay vids.
 
2017-04-16 12:17:50 PM  
I find it curiously contradictory, that Texas is simultaneously the home of the Johnson Spaceflight Center, Texas Instruments, (the late lamented) Radio Shack, and Pantex; while also doing quite well in the race toward Christian-inspired educational ignorance.

Does no one in that misguided state notice the irony? They can't ALL be that stupid, can they?
 
2017-04-16 12:17:56 PM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

You mean that a species is adapting to environmental pressures and passing on a favorable set of genetic conditions to future generations in an attempt to circumvent said pressures? That system sounds really intelligently designed.


Attempt? There is no attempt. It's simply the inevitable consequence of some genes producing an organism that is more or less likely to survive and reproduce in its environment. No intelligence or design necessary.
 
2017-04-16 12:19:30 PM  
Antivaxxers are bioterrorists.
Exile them to Cuba.
 
2017-04-16 12:22:20 PM  

Truck Fump: I find it curiously contradictory, that Texas is simultaneously the home of the Johnson Spaceflight Center, Texas Instruments, (the late lamented) Radio Shack, and Pantex; while also doing quite well in the race toward Christian-inspired educational ignorance.

Does no one in that misguided state notice the irony? They can't ALL be that stupid, can they?


You'll notice that all those are located in the blue parts of Texas.
 
2017-04-16 12:22:34 PM  

Truck Fump: I find it curiously contradictory, that Texas is simultaneously the home of the Johnson Spaceflight Center, Texas Instruments, (the late lamented) Radio Shack, and Pantex; while also doing quite well in the race toward Christian-inspired educational ignorance.

Does no one in that misguided state notice the irony? They can't ALL be that stupid, can they?


They can't ALL be that stupid is the reason that dichotomy exists.

/and now I feel dirty for defending Texas
 
2017-04-16 12:24:24 PM  

Harry Wagstaff: rzrwiresunrise: Harry Wagstaff: ZAZ: Subby: If only there was something, say a common vaccine, that could have prevented such an outbreak.

TFA: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.

Ain't nobody got time for reading no article.

Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps. However, high vaccination coverage helps limit the size, duration, and spread of mumps outbreaks.

Ain't nobody got time to go to the CDC website and read where that "journalist" got that little decontextualized factoid, apparently.

You don't consider 98% high coverage?


Pretty solid coverage.  But that's not enough data to make any decision at all.

Of those that contracted the mumps in this outbreak, how many were immunized and how many weren't?
 
2017-04-16 12:25:12 PM  
Went to Texas and all I got was this Measely© mask.

img.fark.net
 
2017-04-16 12:26:06 PM  

Gordon Bennett: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

You mean that a species is adapting to environmental pressures and passing on a favorable set of genetic conditions to future generations in an attempt to circumvent said pressures? That system sounds really intelligently designed.

Attempt? There is no attempt. It's simply the inevitable consequence of some genes producing an organism that is more or less likely to survive and reproduce in its environment. No intelligence or design necessary.


Can either of you chuckleheads provide a citation that shows any mutation of the known strains of the mumps virus?
 
2017-04-16 12:28:17 PM  

rohar: Harry Wagstaff: rzrwiresunrise: Harry Wagstaff: ZAZ: Subby: If only there was something, say a common vaccine, that could have prevented such an outbreak.

TFA: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.

Ain't nobody got time for reading no article.

Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps. However, high vaccination coverage helps limit the size, duration, and spread of mumps outbreaks.

Ain't nobody got time to go to the CDC website and read where that "journalist" got that little decontextualized factoid, apparently.

You don't consider 98% high coverage?

Pretty solid coverage.  But that's not enough data to make any decision at all.

Of those that contracted the mumps in this outbreak, how many were immunized and how many weren't?


The article only said that most were vaccinated. I would be interested in seeing the numerical breakdown or vaccinated vs. non-vaccinated.
 
2017-04-16 12:29:24 PM  

Truck Fump: I find it curiously contradictory, that Texas is simultaneously the home of the Johnson Spaceflight Center, Texas Instruments, (the late lamented) Radio Shack, and Pantex; while also doing quite well in the race toward Christian-inspired educational ignorance.

Does no one in that misguided state notice the irony? They can't ALL be that stupid, can they?


We don't quite fall into the "mouth off and sound like an idiot because you didn't read the article" level of stupid...

TFA: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have
 
2017-04-16 12:29:45 PM  
Mump sat alone in a boggy marsh,
totally emotionless except for her heart
Mud flowed up into Mump's pajamas
she totally confused all the passing pihranas....

//You're welcome for the earworm...
 
2017-04-16 12:30:11 PM  

Rhaab: backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

This has nothing to do with failing vaccines and everything to do with dumbass anti-vaxers.


Actually it has to do with poverty, immigration, and tough questions involving public health and wellbeing vs. our desire to ignore those without access to healthcare, those that have access but are ignorant, and those whom are afraid to go to clinics because of their legal status in our country.

But hey, keep blaming the anti-vaxers. I'm sure that helps.

/provider
//fark you, moran.
 
2017-04-16 12:31:26 PM  

Harry Wagstaff: rohar: Harry Wagstaff: rzrwiresunrise: Harry Wagstaff: ZAZ: Subby: If only there was something, say a common vaccine, that could have prevented such an outbreak.

TFA: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.

Ain't nobody got time for reading no article.

Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps. However, high vaccination coverage helps limit the size, duration, and spread of mumps outbreaks.

Ain't nobody got time to go to the CDC website and read where that "journalist" got that little decontextualized factoid, apparently.

You don't consider 98% high coverage?

Pretty solid coverage.  But that's not enough data to make any decision at all.

Of those that contracted the mumps in this outbreak, how many were immunized and how many weren't?

The article only said that most were vaccinated. I would be interested in seeing the numerical breakdown or vaccinated vs. non-vaccinated.


Next door know it all just told me that.
 
2017-04-16 12:32:58 PM  
Mexicans then?
 
2017-04-16 12:33:24 PM  

smerfnablin: BarkingUnicorn: backhand.slap.of.reason: Our vaccines are failing.  It happens.

The mumps vaccine was never more than 85% effective.

From the other thread: you dont get to that level until after all 3 doses

Most of the infected kids only have had 1-2 MMR boosters which put them around 70%

Also the outbreak started on south padre island which is on the border with mexico so there is a lot of international traffic


You do realize that Mexico has a higher vaccination rate for mumps than the U.S. cite
 
2017-04-16 12:34:04 PM  

Harry Wagstaff: rohar: Harry Wagstaff: rzrwiresunrise: Harry Wagstaff: ZAZ: Subby: If only there was something, say a common vaccine, that could have prevented such an outbreak.

TFA: Across the nation, most mumps cases are occurring among people who have been vaccinated, according to the CDC, and these outbreaks are not due to low vaccination rates. For example, in Texas, 97.6% of kindergarten-age children have received two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Van Deusen said, while 98.7% of seventh-graders have.

Ain't nobody got time for reading no article.

Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps. However, high vaccination coverage helps limit the size, duration, and spread of mumps outbreaks.

Ain't nobody got time to go to the CDC website and read where that "journalist" got that little decontextualized factoid, apparently.

You don't consider 98% high coverage?

Pretty solid coverage.  But that's not enough data to make any decision at all.

Of those that contracted the mumps in this outbreak, how many were immunized and how many weren't?

The article only said that most were vaccinated. I would be interested in seeing the numerical breakdown or vaccinated vs. non-vaccinated.


It's funny you should ask.  It turns out here in libby as anyone has ever libbed WA, we actually collect these statistics (in stark contrast to TX).  We've recently been dealing with a mumps outbreak as well.  Our coverage is almost identical, but things get really obvious when we look at the statistics of those infected:

So far, 309 infected.  186 vaccinated.

Let that sink in for a moment, only 2% of our population is not vaccinated, yet they account for 39% of the infected.

The unvaccinated are contracting and spreading the mumps at a rate well over 10x the rate of the vaccinated.

That 2% is dangerous as hell.
 
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