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(Independent)   CSB Sunday Morning: Easter tradition   ( independent.co.uk) divider line
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1315 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Apr 2017 at 9:00 AM (31 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-04-15 10:11:08 PM  
Growing up, my family wasn't churchy, so my memories of Easter revolve around all of our extended family meeting at my grandma's place for an easter egg hunt and cousin shenanigans. Even though my grandma didn't have any money, she had a little 2 bedroom bungalow on maybe 5 acres of land carved out of the neighbors field. An acre or so was yard with some full grown apple and pear trees on it, as well as the continually ailing grapevines that she attempted to make wine out of every year. Another acre was a big garden, with the remaining land dedicated to a couple dozen chickens in a coop and some sheep accompanied by a mean-assed billy goat or 2.

So the Easter egg hunts were pretty... adventurous for a kid in the single digits of life. This was the 70s so we used hardboiled eggs that had been carefully dipped in food colored water using that funky wire dipping holder that LaPaz put out in kits. There was only 1 golden egg, and whoever found that one got a real silver dollar which was super cool but not that uncommon back in those days. Even though I don't really remember how the other eggs divied out prizes, there was definitely candy involved for all of us. It seemed like every year, despite the clear instructions that no eggs were up in the sheep area, one of my cousins would convince themselves the golden egg just had to be up there and would get ass-butted by one of the billy goats who would then get beaten by my furious little 4'10" grandma.

I think lots of people were raised around the religious aspect of Easter and that probably provides some good stories too. Or maybe you got to go to the big public egghunts in parks that I see a lot of city kids going to by my neighborhood now. Regardless of the setting, what is a good CSB, or memories of general traditions, of the Easters in your childhood?  Have you passed any of these traditions on with your kids or nieces and nephews? I'm actually going to watch MP and the Holy Grail with my kids tomorrow, to try and start up a new tradition. Let's hear your tales of Easter and Easter traditions.
 
2017-04-15 10:21:24 PM  
We used to take a fambly vacation to Club Med every Spring Break. Because of the local schools, this would always involve us leaving on Easter.

So, one year, we got wise.  My ex-wife and I bought a bunch of candy and a bunch of plastic eggs. We figured we'd hide them around the room for the kids.

So, my ex got to talking with some of the other moms on vacation who had done the same thing.  Between our families, we probably had 144-ish eggs and enough candy to fill them. There were only 30-40 kids. We decided that we would hide the eggs around the resort and hold an Easter egg hunt for all.

So, Sunday morning, around 6 am, the moms all sent the dads outside to hide eggs.

At 7, the kids were released to go hunt.

They found none eggs.

Like, we *knew* where we hid *some* of them. Those eggs weren't there.

This resulted in a *bunch* of super disappointed kids and a large number of very angry moms who were still reluctant to believe that we'd hid any of the eggs and that this wasn't some stupid prank.

But, then, somebody noticed a brother and sister eating the shiat out of some candy. These kids had a metric farkton of candy, in fact.

And, one of the dads said that he had seen those little shiats on their balcony while we were hiding eggs.

The moms confronted the kids and subsequently their mom.

All three swore up and down that they brought the candy with them from home.

fark you, kids.
 
2017-04-15 10:22:05 PM  
Definitely a nicely told tale.  Thanks.
 
2017-04-15 10:22:55 PM  
dugitman
 
2017-04-15 10:29:48 PM  
A complete and total lack of sleeping in, OVERENTHUSIASTIC HAPPINESS AT SEVEN IN THE MORNING, and ham.

Candy makes up for it somewhat, but I might just refuse to get up tomorrow without an energy drink. Or drive myself down to the store and chug one before church.

/I mean. I do appreciate that my Catholic family is celebrating an important event with me. But why can you not wait to be perky until after noon?
 
2017-04-15 10:32:55 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

Starting one tonight.
 
2017-04-15 10:33:38 PM  
My kids are adults, now but, they've been going to an egg smash for 12 years.

Andrea hosts it. It involves eggs that have been drained and dried and filled with confetti. I think the idea was originally to throw them at things. Being children, though, it mostly resulted in kids running up to one-another and smashing the egg on the victim's forehead.

This is what it has become, today. 18-22 year olds snatching eggs off the ground and smashing them at hockey-speed on each other's faces.

It's amazing that nobody has lost an eye.
 
2017-04-15 10:37:36 PM  
we don't have children and usually this is a busy week-end and for some reason the house is a wreck. so Chinese take-out has been our Easter tradition for a very long time.
 
2017-04-15 10:48:29 PM  
We would try to stuff the eggs back in the chicken.

Good times.
 
2017-04-15 10:49:02 PM  
We would find the easter baskets our parents hid. When we were young we went to Mass after gorging ourselves on Chocolate.

When we reached double digits we went to the Easter Vigil, which is the best of all Masses, as it is at night, you get to stay up late, it starts in total darkness and there is fire.

While my grandparents were alive we all congregated at one house for dinner, then after they died it was mom and dad's with all the relatives. After my dad died mom and I would either have everyone over to her house or go to one of my brother's and their family for Easter. Ever since I was a kid mom loved hiding the Easter baskets, mom and dad even hid one for each other for as long as I can remember. Every year up to her death I hid a basket for mom. This year I got the basket, mom loved to save baskets, and I filled it with treats for the cats and myself. The cats are eating a strip of Pull and Play cat treats and I'm going for my chocolate bunny soon.

Tomorrow I'm going over to my brother and SIL where we'll have the traditional Passover/Easter ham. They're not sticklers with the dietary laws.
 
2017-04-15 10:59:24 PM  
My family didn't have much in the way of easter tradtions, but my wife's did.  Specifically, Easter bread, the family recipe kielbasa, and pysanky eggs.  The easter bread was supposed to be tall, so we'd use a flour canister as a mold.  One year it got to 14 inches high.  I regret that I can't seem to find a picture.

The kielbasa was chunks of pork, not ground, and was always in great demand. One year we started with 40 pounds of pork so that all the relatives would stop complaining there wasn't enough.
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The eggs were where we had the most fun.  Instead of following traditional patterns, we added a  little flair to ours.
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2017-04-15 11:17:24 PM  
I was raised in a Byzantine Catholic church full of Slovaks and Poles. We have kind of odd traditions. We did a procession around the church every Good Friday, which involved the priest carrying an icon of Jesus crucified and the parishioners following behind walking around the church like a funeral procession.
Now that doesn't seem so weird.  The weird part was that someone got the idea that the Sunday School kids should be more involved.  So what do they do?  They give all the kids the implements of Jesus' torture to carry.  One kid got the spear that pierced him, another got the crown of thorns.
They got creative with some of them, like a "whip" that was obviously a jump rope and (my personal favorite) a pair of fuzzy dice to represent the lots that were cast for Jesus' clothes.  So we had to parade around the church with this stuff.  Didn't strike me as weird until I was explaining this to college friends, and they looked at me like I was crazy.
//I have pictures to prove it somewhere
//probably at my parents house.
 
2017-04-15 11:36:50 PM  
My family would go to Hilton Head, SC every year for Easter when I was a kid.  It was cool.  My grandparents had a time share there, so they were there.  My parent's best friends, who were like another aunt and uncle, also joined us.  Other years other people came and went.

The important part is that my immediate family spent most of those years at a place called the Breakers, that had bunk beds in what should have been a closet.  That's where my brother and I slept.  My brother and I argued about who slept on the top bunk all the time.  Like, we'd start arguing about it in Pennsylvania, and by North Carolina we were ready to fight.

Every year, we would up agreeing to trade each night who got the top bunk.

Every year, as a guy who has a last name Hogan, I'd end up about as sunburned as you'd ever expect.

i.imgur.comView Full Size


Yeah, it was like that.  I once managed to get a sunburn on the bottom of my feet.  And I was walking all day.

So by Easter I was usually sunburned as all hell, and then I'd get a ton of chocolate and eggs.  Every year, as a tradition, I'd get told not too eat too much chocolate on Easter.  Every year, I didn't care.  It was never a problem.

But one year I just kept eating, and eating, and eating chocolate and peanut butter covered in chocolate, and I was already sunburned, and I just overdid it.  I really overdid it.  I mean, I Joey Chestnut'd all kinds of chocolate.  And I had a small amount of nausea from being in the sun way too much.

I had the top bunk that night.  Apparently it sounded like when you do the hike behind Niagara Falls.
 
2017-04-15 11:39:41 PM  
After posting about the time I puked a lot, who here actually knew that David Hogan is the name of the character in this scene?

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2017-04-15 11:43:08 PM  
As a musician, I get paid for Easter. I have never had a tradition other than working this gig every year, but at least it pays well.
 
2017-04-16 01:54:00 AM  
Whomever can get to Silicon Valley makes a trek up a little ribbon of dirt road barely attached to some steep hills outside of Milpitas, meets up at a rusted 1925 Caterpillar tractor, and has a picnic.

Gram, 98, and her baby sister, 95, fixes everyone Easter baskets containing: 1) green plastic grass, 2) jellybeans and chocolate bunny 3) jar of spaghetti sauce 4) box of noodles 5) canister of Kraft parmesan 6) a small bottle of very, very bad red wine. And then makes us all hide them, and then look for them again.

We're not sure how that happened - Gram's insistence on the baskets' contents, or that a good 20 people in their teens to 60s accept that once a year, it's a totally normal thing to comb the hills for their personal basket of dubiously awesome Italian dinner fixin's. And foil-covered bunnies. But we like it.

I'm currently hanging out in a hotel, assuring my aunt that I've got a car full of silly baskets and that yes, thank god, someone else is picking up the 95-year old baby sister (great aunt Margie) and as long as we quickly hand her some fancy-looking crackers and cheese and a watered down mimosa as soon as we hit the ranch, she might behave. Maybe. Margie is not a fan of behaving.

I love this place and these people. I have home ties to many places, but the ranch is the deep-root tree. It's a good re-charge to stand in the place that I am from every now and then.
 
2017-04-16 07:03:35 AM  
My Easter tradition is egg hunting with my sister.  Ever since we were kids our Mom would do an at home easter egg hunt, with at least a few with $$ in them,  No rules were established, and it was explicitly said that it was whoever found the eggs got them, no even stevens.  Now, I'm 4.5 years older than my sister and we're talking ages 8 and 13.  The end result was me finding 3/5ths of the eggs and about $4 more, and my sister in tears crying about the unfairness of it all - thus cementing the family tradition of the unfair egg hunt.

Fast forward nearly 20 years later, and we're still doing the egg hunt, and it gets better every year, and now we have our partners join in too.  In 2015 my sister decided pushing/knocking someone over was fair game when they were bending over looking for eggs.  Last year I made it psychological by shouting FOUND ONE, multiple times, to great comical effect.  This year I'm planning on planting 1 or 2 fake eggs with fake money.  What?  It's all in good fun. 😝
 
2017-04-16 07:39:33 AM  
Gathering with uncles, aunts, and cousins on Dad's side. Plenty of Italian pastries, plus playoff hockey/basketball playing on the TV in the spare room.
 
2017-04-16 08:53:34 AM  
When I was stationed in Worst Korea, I was involved in a lot of volunteer activities and extracurriculars outside of the scope of my job. Because I was one of the youngest airmen stationed at our tiny base at the time, I was ...more easily manipulated. I was asked, would you volunteer to go to an orphanage and help cheer up the children? I agreed. Couldn't be too hard to make an orphan smile.

My coworkers brought me an Easter Bunny costume. I objected, then relented. After putting on the costume and arriving at the orphanage, I hopped around a little bit, felt really foolish, and delivered Easter baskets to Korean kids.

Fast forward 11 years. I've got a fursuit. It was that event, I think, all those years ago, that turned me into a Furry. There's no way it had to do with looking at porn of Lola Bunny.
 
2017-04-16 09:02:33 AM  
Eating a big-ass ham.
 
2017-04-16 09:09:21 AM  
no easter traditions as a kid.

I have, however, started one as an adult. every year, I wake up easter Sunday, brush my teeth, throw out the trash and head the to grocery store, which is closed. I then drive around the parking lot swearing for a bit, before going to waffle house.
 
2017-04-16 09:15:37 AM  
My tradition seems to be finding a new store every year closed on Easter. wtf, people? Damn it, I need to shop on Sundays!

But my oddest Easter story actually occurred the day after, when I was hauled into HR and raked over the coals because I'd worked the day before (my shift was Sun-Thur back then). "Well, yes," I explained. "I work Sundays. I came to work. There was work to do. I did it."

Turns out I was supposed to have the day off (nobody told ME!) and *I* was in trouble because they had to pay me 2.5x for the day I'd worked.

/back then the kids were little; would've appreciated having a Sunday off
 
2017-04-16 09:16:38 AM  
Waking up to an Easter basket.  Going to church at First Baptist, and getting a foofy new dress and white patent shoes.
 
2017-04-16 09:30:52 AM  
not many Easter traditions around here, other than listening to this badboy at least once

Peter Gabriel - Passion ( The Last Temptation of Christ) (Full Album)
Youtube qJYHdkAOvK8
 
2017-04-16 09:36:25 AM  

Fat Old Broad: Waking up to an Easter basket.  Going to church at First Baptist, and getting a foofy new dress and white patent shoes.


In fact, I'm wearing that kit now and am ready for my close-up.
 
2017-04-16 09:43:11 AM  
Easter in my family, for whatever reason, has always been the holiday out of the Big 3 (Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas) that we don't cook for.  I don't ever remember eating at home for it. Up until about ten years ago, roughly, it was my family and my aunt's family terrorizing some poor restaurant, usually Magoni's in Somerset. I'd always get the prime rib. (Mom's uncle Timmy was a meat salesman, and apparently they always buy the highest quality cuts.)

We've changed through the years, changing restaurants and paring off our family from theirs for size purposes (our family dinner is 10, theirs - if it ever actually happens anymore - would be 14 or 15, depending). It'll actually be a little weird today going to a seafood restaurant on New Bedford Harbor and knowing I can't get prime rib.
 
2017-04-16 09:48:22 AM  

Fat Old Broad: Fat Old Broad: Waking up to an Easter basket.  Going to church at First Baptist, and getting a foofy new dress and white patent shoes.

In fact, I'm wearing that kit now and am ready for my close-up.


TTIUWOP
 
2017-04-16 10:03:57 AM  
When I was a kid it was hard boiled eggs and dye for the egg hunt as dugitman said. A couple of eggs would always get lost until they started to rot.  Then you could find them.

Also Church.  I was raised Catholic so it was the family in our Sunday best.  Which for me meant slacks and a short sleeve dress shirt and clip on tie.

These days its plastic eggs and my folks put little trinkets inside for my niece and nephews.
 
2017-04-16 10:05:46 AM  
As a youngling, it was find basket, go to church, and then head to my grandparents for the afternoon. Much Like christmas, the adults would get hammered, and the kids would run around and cause a ruckus. (I have 15 cousins on that side. Mom has 5 brothers and sisters...) we did have some large street football games with adults and kids playing). When it was decent weather, we would all take the mile or two walk down to the park by the river. My cousins and I would throw sticks into the river to have races to see whose would go over the damn first. If it was ugly and or cold, kids would play games while the adults (and later on, me) would play Sheepshead. The adults got hammered either way.


Now I have kids of my own. We usually have my wife's mother and grandmother over sometime during the day. She is a only child. And has no cousins. It is a relaxing day.

We did Good Friday service already. I am not a big fan of Christmas nor Easter services. We go to a non denominational church and, while these services are celebratory, it is basicly a loud obnoxious concert. I guess I am getting old.

The first year the kids were with us, my wife hid flip flops in the stove. Every year now the kids get excited for their Easter flip flops. Even as teenagers.
 
2017-04-16 10:24:14 AM  

mama2tnt: Fat Old Broad: Fat Old Broad: Waking up to an Easter basket.  Going to church at First Baptist, and getting a foofy new dress and white patent shoes.

In fact, I'm wearing that kit now and am ready for my close-up.

TTIUWOP


img.fark.netView Full Size



(* all hail Tuna, Texas and the great Joe Sears and Jaston Williams)
 
2017-04-16 10:27:27 AM  
No Easter tradition. I'm a Jew.
 
2017-04-16 10:33:28 AM  
Not a tradition but when I lived on Long Island my landlord felt bad for me because I couldnt make it home for Easter so he invited me to have Easter dinner with his family.  They were Polish and lived in Howard Beach.  As soon as we arrived the Father hands me a shot of something and says "if you dont drink with me you are notta my friend".  Alright, now I'm on board.  Then we kept drinking and ate dinner.  The dining room table had a tray of liquor as its centerpiece.  The Father passed out in his lounge chair by around 2. It was a helluva good time.  Friendliest people you'll ever meet.
 
2017-04-16 11:06:51 AM  
Sorry this isn't a CSB, but it's Fark's Easter post, it's as close as I can get.

What is the origin of "Unless you kill Jesus, you have no third act"?
I imagine it's a quote from a scriptwriter, author or a producer.
It means that for storytelling purposes Jesus had to die so he could return and wrap up the story, setting the stage for a sequel.

My Google-Fu is weak but I trust crowdsourcing this inquiry to the Farkers will find the quote.
 
2017-04-16 11:44:07 AM  
dugitman: ''some sheep accompanied by a mean-assed billy goat or 2.''

Just curious:  Did grandma card and dye her own wool?  And why billy goats?  Male goats stink (and don't produce any milk...)
 
2017-04-16 11:48:11 AM  
Hah! Usually I suck at hiding things. As in it takes less than a minute or 2 to find baskets and flip flops. It took 15 minutes for the kids to find everything. I had to play 'warmer/colder' so the 16 year old could get to work. (I got her a car. But the agreement was that she had to get a job and pay 60% of the payment and insurance and keep grades over 3.0. She found a job that is less than 12 hours a week @9.50/hr. Serving meals at an assisted living place... rambling. Proud daddy moment)

It has been 45 minutes. Still missing 2 eggs. The dogs haven't found them yet. That is a good at least
 
2017-04-16 12:03:30 PM  
This is going to interesting. Either the kids missed an egg and can't find it, mrs.4335 had one last night, but vaguely remember, or a dog ate it. I really hope we don't find a rotten egg months from now. I will laugh... and then probably puke
 
2017-04-16 12:11:03 PM  
When I was a wee lad we used to gather at grandma's house for an easter egg hunt with all my cousins. Then off to church.  Grandma would make a nice ham. After the meal was done and the dishes cleared away we would head out into the woods across the street in time for sun down. Then we would wait.

The year Jesus didn't see his shadow was the best year ever.
 
2017-04-16 12:15:32 PM  
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2017-04-16 12:26:18 PM  
The clomp clomp clomp of children in dress shoes all dressed up for church pacing in the house.
 
2017-04-16 12:42:30 PM  

unfarkingbelievable: No Easter tradition. I'm a Jew.


No Paisach In Portugal ?
https://youtu.be/KGtPIcKQqnE
 
2017-04-16 12:42:35 PM  
When very young, starchy crinolines, new Easter dress, gloves, hat, the whole nine yards.  Hold up the basket for the annual picture with all the cousins, then gorge on ham, tater salad, rolls, and sweet tea.  Once I became a teen, my youth group at church would climb Stone Mtn, at 4 in the morning for a sunrise Easter service.  I sang in the adult choir, so I'd have to rush down the mountain, run home and change to be in the choir loft on time.  Lo, these many eons later, I still don't feel like it's Easter if I haven't stumbled up that mountain in the dark.  If He can overcome that grave, I can overcome those damn roots in the darkness and not have banged up knees and elbows when I get home.

When my niece and nephews were young, we would hide eggs for them, and each year, the eggs got hidden better and better.  By the time they decided to stop hunting eggs, we were throwing them on the roof, so they would roll down and hang in the gutters and down spouts.  We also like to hide them in ant hills. and in the garbage cans.  I was afraid they would be driving themselves to the egg hunt before we could stop hiding eggs.
 
2017-04-16 01:18:09 PM  
Earlier, I went out into the yard cause the Scotty was doing her I've found a turtle and want to eat it bark. I go out there and find there's a large snapping turtle on the other side of the fence. I grab the shovel to push it farther away from the fence and that when I knock down an Easter egg the kids missed Friday night. I tossed the candy and added the egg to the pile of empties for next year
 
2017-04-16 01:18:15 PM  

unfarkingbelievable: No Easter tradition. I'm a Jew.


Okay.... Passover tradition.
 
2017-04-16 01:20:56 PM  

OtherLittleGuy: unfarkingbelievable: No Easter tradition. I'm a Jew.

Okay.... Passover tradition.


Seder down, they may have matza reasons for not sharing this morning.
 
2017-04-16 01:31:29 PM  
In my family, holidays have always been huge productions for the kids. We'd wake up to elaborate baskets and then go hunt the dozens of eggs we boiled and dyed the day before, as well as plastic ones with candy. When my oldest was little, my sister insisted on stuffing her into formal Easter dresses for pics--where she wouldn't ever smile because she HATED dresses. Some years included hats and gloves. She's grown now and doesn't do Easter dresses, but we all still get baskets and hunt eggs. Most of my immediate family has passed, so there are no big get togethers--though I wish there could be. My mom made every holiday magic, and she could cook like nobody's business. Now, my littlest one happily gets dressed up, hat and all, and we hunt eggs all around our property after the neighbors' donkey wakes the kids because he sees us outside and wants attention. As our baby gets older, we'll start looking for ways to make hunts more challenging.

/I'm stealing ideas from this thread, btw
//especially the Easter kielbasa
///three for days in this weekend :)
 
2017-04-16 02:17:31 PM  
My family isn't religious but we enjoyed the secular side of Easter as kids. Mom put together awesome Easter baskets that always contained candy, a book, a stuffed animal, and a toy or something like makeup or a CD when we got older. Oh yeah, this tradition continued until college because it was fun and why the hell not? They'd hide the baskets before we woke up and the first task of the day was to find them. We did egg hunts for a few years but they usually ended up being indoors due to rain. And of course, the big ham dinner, mom's primary motivation for celebrating Easter.

I'd probably do things similarly if I had kids. As it is, half of the last 10 years we've been camping or otherwise out of town on Easter and the other half we've only done Easter when the in-laws invited us. As that involves going to Mass, I didn't press the issue this year.
 
2017-04-16 02:32:01 PM  
Like many other Farkers, my family on my mother's side would all gather at my grandparents house to search for plastic eggs scattered around the farm. They would put candy, loose change and stickers and other assorted odds and ends in the eggs.

My grandmother decided one year that we would also do a pinata, which was also full of candy. All the kids would take turns donning the blindfold and swinging the stick at the pinata after the requisite ten spins. As the oldest cousin, my turn was always last, so that the younger kids would have a chance to take a swing. This tradition continued on for several years, despite the difficulty of keeping the unblindfolded kids from rushing the candy as soon as a little came out, running directly into the line of fire of the still-blindfolded kid swinging away.

Eventually I got old enough that I had too much of an unfair advantage, around 13 or so, so they stopped letting me use the stick. I had to punch the pinata into submission. I distinctly remember swinging my fists at the air, unable to see a thing, and missing a few times before finally landing a hit that didn't break the pinata, but did manage to break it off of the string it was attached to, and sent it flying at the watching adults. Good times.
 
2017-04-16 07:44:28 PM  

TruBluTroll: Like many other Farkers, my family on my mother's side would all gather at my grandparents house to search for plastic eggs scattered around the farm. They would put candy, loose change and stickers and other assorted odds and ends in the eggs.

My grandmother decided one year that we would also do a pinata, which was also full of candy. All the kids would take turns donning the blindfold and swinging the stick at the pinata after the requisite ten spins. As the oldest cousin, my turn was always last, so that the younger kids would have a chance to take a swing. This tradition continued on for several years, despite the difficulty of keeping the unblindfolded kids from rushing the candy as soon as a little came out, running directly into the line of fire of the still-blindfolded kid swinging away.

Eventually I got old enough that I had too much of an unfair advantage, around 13 or so, so they stopped letting me use the stick. I had to punch the pinata into submission. I distinctly remember swinging my fists at the air, unable to see a thing, and missing a few times before finally landing a hit that didn't break the pinata, but did manage to break it off of the string it was attached to, and sent it flying at the watching adults. Good times.


Punch the piñata?

Are we not doing phrasing?
 
2017-04-16 10:09:13 PM  
"German" eggs are our tradition. Take a hard boiled egg, cut in half, pop the yolk out (in a clean single hemisphere if you can) add apple cider vinegar and a drop of olive oil. Yolk back on top, salt, pepper, and down the hatch. My grandma was German, and the family has always just called them "German eggs." It's kind of a litmus test for significant others brought around for Easter. If they refuse (or even worse, try to bite into it instead of taking it whole) that is seen as a red flag for compatibility.

It's really pretty good once you get over the idea of taking a mouthful of vinegar. It's basically eating a deconstructed deviled egg. I don't know anyone outside of my family that does this, though I'm sure there have to be others.
 
2017-04-16 10:59:43 PM  
Our Easter is the traditional shrimp.  Yes, SHRIMP.  My dad's birthday is Christmas Day, so he never gets to pick what he wants for dinner, so goshdarnit he WILL have what he wants for Easter holiday instead!  SHRIMP!

Today, six of us put a deep hurting on NINE POUNDS.  Of shrimp.  I think I should dye my hair pink, I've consumed so much flamingo-pink-making colorant.

A few years back, we were getting ready for The Traditional Shrimpalooza, so my dad walked over to my uncle's house to pick up the 5 pounds that said uncle gives each family at Christmas.  Uncle gets funny look...funny look turns to terror....um, I may have eaten your Christmas present by mistake....I thought it was mine, I forgot you stored yours in my freezer too...!

No problem, Dad will go and get more, no biggie!  Right?  Do you want to know just how many 5-pound boxes of ocean shrimp were available in the whole entire county?  (For those playing at home: zero.  We counted.  Twice.)  Dad did the Tour de Berks County to find enough one-pound boxes to feed the hungry gaping hordes.

About pysanky: years ago I taught a few classes on basic pysanky, had a great time, all of us go home with our precious cargo.  Only, because I was assured by the Ukrainian ladies that taught me, you don't have to blow the eggs out when you're done, they didn't in the past, no problem, turn them once in a while and the raw egg inside will just evaporate and no problem.  Five years later, one of the local ladies comes back from Pennsic and the egg that has been happily living in splendor on her mantel is GONE!  At first they suspected the cats, but in this case they were totally innocent.  They found shards all the way across the 20-foot living room, on top of the window molding, stuck in the curtains!  The sucker EXPLODED - five freaking *years* after the creation!
 
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