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(The Daily Beast)   Before the US entered WWI, two Americans volunteered as ambulance drivers, then wrote literary masterpieces. One was 19-year old Hemingway, the other was 21-year old John Dos Passos, whose "impassioned warning against war sadly fell on deaf ears"   ( thedailybeast.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Ernest Hemingway, Dos Passos, Lost Generation, ambulance corps, Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps, particular-John Dos Passos, Dos Passos Hemingway, World War II  
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815 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 14 Apr 2017 at 6:50 PM (40 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



44 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-04-14 03:45:33 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


(god awful movie.)
 
2017-04-14 04:04:50 PM  

gopher321: [img.fark.net image 636x400]

(god awful movie.)


Nonstop horror.
 
2017-04-14 04:44:59 PM  
very cool, hadn't heard of this guy or the book.
 
2017-04-14 05:18:36 PM  
 
2017-04-14 05:31:14 PM  

gopher321: [img.fark.net image 636x400]

(god awful movie.)


It's a really good film with the exception of the pool/seal bark scene actually. And it's tolerably faithful to the book from which it is derived. Considering how hard it is to make a great novel into a movie, they did OK with it.

"A Razor's Edge" - my favorite lines:

"Is it true: It's easy to be a holy man on top of a mountain?"

"You are closer than you think; The path of a righteous man is narrow, and as hard to walk as a Razor's edge."

Might be the best movie Bill Murray ever made.
 
2017-04-14 07:02:14 PM  
"Surely there can be little in this world more awful than the spectacle of a strong man in the moment when he is utterly weak and broken."

/not hemingway, but one of his influences
//what i always think of when someone mentions ernest
///hemingways nephew was my scout leader csb
 
2017-04-14 07:13:46 PM  

mainsail: Dos Passos books here:
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/author/2015


WTF, Project Gutenberg? "Don't use anonymizers, open proxies, VPNs, or TOR to access Project Gutenberg. This includes the Google proxies that are used by Chrome."
Anyhow, would like to recommend Dos Passos' Most Likely to Succeed, a good account of Hollywood during the Red Scare.
 
2017-04-14 07:15:02 PM  
Hey guys, what's going on n this thread?

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-04-14 07:18:25 PM  
President Woodrow Wilson insisted that "America is too proud to fight" but demanded an end to attacks on passenger ships. Germany complied.
..
In January 1917, Germany resumed unrestricted submarine warfare


Syriasly, why did they do that?
 
2017-04-14 07:19:13 PM  

bmwericus: gopher321: [img.fark.net image 636x400]

(god awful movie.)

It's a really good film with the exception of the pool/seal bark scene actually. And it's tolerably faithful to the book from which it is derived. Considering how hard it is to make a great novel into a movie, they did OK with it.

"A Razor's Edge" - my favorite lines:

"Is it true: It's easy to be a holy man on top of a mountain?"

"You are closer than you think; The path of a righteous man is narrow, and as hard to walk as a Razor's edge."

Might be the best movie Bill Murray ever made.


It's also how we got Ghostbusters. After Stripes, the studios wanted to bankroll more Murray films but he pushed back and said he would only do the next one if they would let him make The Razor's Edge.

/I went and found the stairs in Paris
/Yes I ran up them too
 
2017-04-14 07:20:38 PM  
Dos Passos' U.S.A. Trilogy is really impressive and under-read.
 
2017-04-14 07:30:34 PM  
I mentioned before that I was in Europe. It's not the first time that I was in Europe, I was in Europe many years ago with Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway had just written his first novel, and Gertrude Stein and I read it, and we said that is was a good novel, but not a great one, and that it needed some work, but it could be a fine book. And we laughed over it. Hemingway punched me in the mouth.
That winter Picasso lived on the Rue d'Barque, and he had just painted a picture of a naked dental hygenist in the middle of the Gobi Desert. Gertrude Stein said it was a good picture, but not a great one, and I said it could be a fine picture. We laughed over it and Hemingway punched me in the mouth.
Francis Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald came home from their wild new years eve party. It was April. Scott had just written Great Expectations, and Gertrude Stein and I read it, and we said it was a good book, but there was no need to have written it, 'cause Charles Dickens had already written it. We laughed over it, and Hemingway punched me in the mouth.
 
2017-04-14 07:32:08 PM  

LewDux: President Woodrow Wilson insisted that "America is too proud to fight" but demanded an end to attacks on passenger ships. Germany complied.
..
In January 1917, Germany resumed unrestricted submarine warfare

Syriasly, why did they do that?


Was it over when the Germans bombed our passenger ships?
 
2017-04-14 07:34:48 PM  

LewDux: President Woodrow Wilson insisted that "America is too proud to fight" but demanded an end to attacks on passenger ships. Germany complied.
..
In January 1917, Germany resumed unrestricted submarine warfare

Syriasly, why did they do that?


Admiral Holtzendorff convinced the Kaiser that if the German navy sank enough merchant ships quickly enough, they could turn the tide of the war before the U.S. got pissed enough to intervene.
 
2017-04-14 07:55:22 PM  

LewDux: President Woodrow Wilson insisted that "America is too proud to fight" but demanded an end to attacks on passenger ships. Germany complied.
..
In January 1917, Germany resumed unrestricted submarine warfare

Syriasly, why did they do that?


Probably because those passenger ships were also carrying munitions to our the sides Germany was fighting against.
/the ships weren't truely neutral
 
2017-04-14 07:59:36 PM  

JDJoeE: LewDux: President Woodrow Wilson insisted that "America is too proud to fight" but demanded an end to attacks on passenger ships. Germany complied.
..
In January 1917, Germany resumed unrestricted submarine warfare

Syriasly, why did they do that?

Probably because those passenger ships were also carrying munitions to our the sides Germany was fighting against.
/the ships weren't truely neutral


yeah, but they stopped doing that before starting again
 
2017-04-14 08:17:37 PM  
Raymond Chandler volunteered, age 28 or 29, in the Canadian services, and fought in France.  Afterward, he came back to the US and scribbled a few lines for a living.
 
2017-04-14 08:22:01 PM  

bmwericus: gopher321: [img.fark.net image 636x400]

(god awful movie.)

It's a really good film with the exception of the pool/seal bark scene actually. And it's tolerably faithful to the book from which it is derived. Considering how hard it is to make a great novel into a movie, they did OK with it.

"A Razor's Edge" - my favorite lines:

"Is it true: It's easy to be a holy man on top of a mountain?"

"You are closer than you think; The path of a righteous man is narrow, and as hard to walk as a Razor's edge."

Might be the best movie Bill Murray ever made.


I remember it didn't do that well.  People had him down as Stripes-y and Meatballs-y and didn't understand why they weren't busting a gut..."Wow, I guess he's really not that funny..."  like he was suddenly going to go into Nick Winters, Lounge Singer or something.
 
2017-04-14 08:25:16 PM  

Billy Liar: bmwericus: gopher321: [img.fark.net image 636x400]

(god awful movie.)

It's a really good film with the exception of the pool/seal bark scene actually. And it's tolerably faithful to the book from which it is derived. Considering how hard it is to make a great novel into a movie, they did OK with it.

"A Razor's Edge" - my favorite lines:

"Is it true: It's easy to be a holy man on top of a mountain?"

"You are closer than you think; The path of a righteous man is narrow, and as hard to walk as a Razor's edge."

Might be the best movie Bill Murray ever made.

I remember it didn't do that well.  People had him down as Stripes-y and Meatballs-y and didn't understand why they weren't busting a gut..."Wow, I guess he's really not that funny..."  like he was suddenly going to go into Nick Winters, Lounge Singer or something.


Yes, it's not an easy movie - as I noted, they had to cut a lot from an excellent book, and yes, it was absent much of the mugging Bill is justifiably famous for.

Hey, John Belushi did a serious movie once too, most people can't name it - OK, maybe not serious, but a sort of romantic film. Blair Brown, yummy!
 
2017-04-14 08:28:16 PM  
Hey, John Belushi did a serious movie once too, most people can't name it - OK, maybe not serious, but a sort of romantic film. Blair Brown, yummy!

"
Continental Divide."  It's actually a very good movie.
 
2017-04-14 08:30:39 PM  

EnglishMajor: Hey, John Belushi did a serious movie once too, most people can't name it - OK, maybe not serious, but a sort of romantic film. Blair Brown, yummy!

"Continental Divide."  It's actually a very good movie.


You are the other guy who saw it! Yea, I liked it too in a quiet way. It makes you wonder what Belushi could have done had he not had a bad drug habit...
 
2017-04-14 08:32:40 PM  

Billy Liar: Raymond Chandler volunteered, age 28 or 29, in the Canadian services, and fought in France.  Afterward, he came back to the US and scribbled a few lines for a living.


I wonder how he ranked as an oil-company exec. We need critical biographies of Wallace Stevens the insurance executive, Rimbaud the coffee trader, etc.
 
2017-04-14 08:56:07 PM  

bmwericus: gopher321: [img.fark.net image 636x400]

(god awful movie.)

It's a really good film with the exception of the pool/seal bark scene actually. And it's tolerably faithful to the book from which it is derived. Considering how hard it is to make a great novel into a movie, they did OK with it.

"A Razor's Edge" - my favorite lines:

"Is it true: It's easy to be a holy man on top of a mountain?"

"You are closer than you think; The path of a righteous man is narrow, and as hard to walk as a Razor's edge."

Might be the best movie Bill Murray ever made.


I've often stolen Denholm Elliott's line: "People think I'm being vulgar when I'm being serious, and serious when I'm being vulgar."

And there was something about Catherine Hicks in that and in Garbo Talks that gets me all flustered.

And what the hell was that drink she used to wreck Sophie?
 
2017-04-14 09:13:04 PM  
A-ha!

Żubrówka

img.fark.netView Full Size


That does look dangerous.
 
2017-04-14 09:16:41 PM  

macadamnut: A-ha!

Żubrówka

[img.fark.net image 236x314]

That does look dangerous.


And of course it's illegal in the US. God damn what a dump.
 
2017-04-14 09:45:46 PM  
at least Wilhelm II never used chemical weapons
 
2017-04-14 09:58:41 PM  

gopher321: [img.fark.net image 636x400]

(god awful movie.)


I've got a soft spot for that film - maybe it was Theresa Russell. It took me 3 or 4 times before I was able to get past Bill Murray Comedian and get to Bill Murray Giving Serious Roles A Try. I think Catherine Hicks ruined that film. Larry should have shot Isabel at the end.
 
2017-04-14 10:00:48 PM  

HighOnCraic: I mentioned before that I was in Europe. It's not the first time that I was in Europe, I was in Europe many years ago with Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway had just written his first novel, and Gertrude Stein and I read it, and we said that is was a good novel, but not a great one, and that it needed some work, but it could be a fine book. And we laughed over it. Hemingway punched me in the mouth.
That winter Picasso lived on the Rue d'Barque, and he had just painted a picture of a naked dental hygenist in the middle of the Gobi Desert. Gertrude Stein said it was a good picture, but not a great one, and I said it could be a fine picture. We laughed over it and Hemingway punched me in the mouth.
Francis Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald came home from their wild new years eve party. It was April. Scott had just written Great Expectations, and Gertrude Stein and I read it, and we said it was a good book, but there was no need to have written it, 'cause Charles Dickens had already written it. We laughed over it, and Hemingway punched me in the mouth.


Are you high on crack, or something?
 
2017-04-14 10:09:50 PM  
that's funny, i've read the usa trilogy, but don't think i every read hemmingway....maybe one, but nothing comes to mind
 
2017-04-14 10:15:26 PM  

Dead for Tax Reasons: that's funny, i've read the usa trilogy, but don't think i every read hemmingway....maybe one, but nothing comes to mind


C'mon, buddy.  Everybody read The Old Man and the Sea in middle school.
 
2017-04-14 10:20:35 PM  
PJ O'Rourke?
 
2017-04-14 10:27:36 PM  

Dr Jack Badofsky: Dead for Tax Reasons: that's funny, i've read the usa trilogy, but don't think i every read hemmingway....maybe one, but nothing comes to mind

C'mon, buddy.  Everybody read The Old Man and the Sea in middle school.


maybe, but doesn't ring a bell.  the only assigned book i remember from middle school is 'the outsiders' in 7th grade, and i also read 1984 and brave new world on my own

i blocked most of it out because i hated english class and what they made us read, even though i loved reading

also diary of anne frank we read in 8th grade
 
2017-04-14 10:36:35 PM  

Dead for Tax Reasons: Dr Jack Badofsky: Dead for Tax Reasons: that's funny, i've read the usa trilogy, but don't think i every read hemmingway....maybe one, but nothing comes to mind

C'mon, buddy.  Everybody read The Old Man and the Sea in middle school.

maybe, but doesn't ring a bell.  the only assigned book i remember from middle school is 'the outsiders' in 7th grade, and i also read 1984 and brave new world on my own

i blocked most of it out because i hated english class and what they made us read, even though i loved reading

also diary of anne frank we read in 8th grade


I read the Call of the Wild in 7th grade on my own because my mom loved the book and fever me a copy.  Awesome book.  In 9th grade English, we had 4 books to choose from to analyze, each one increasingly harder than the next.  CotW was the hardest.  I argued with my teacher to let me work on that book the entire period, but the said no and that was it.  Only later I found out my older brother had her and it wasn't pretty, so I got screwed.
 
2017-04-14 10:37:45 PM  

Dead for Tax Reasons: also diary of anne frank we read in 8th grade


I recall being very moved at the part where she learns to associate "W-A-T-E-R" with the stuff gushing out of the pump.
 
2017-04-14 10:44:01 PM  

natch: PJ O'Rourke?


denisboyles.comView Full Size
 
2017-04-15 01:03:38 AM  

ol' gormsby: HighOnCraic: I mentioned before that I was in Europe. It's not the first time that I was in Europe, I was in Europe many years ago with Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway had just written his first novel, and Gertrude Stein and I read it, and we said that is was a good novel, but not a great one, and that it needed some work, but it could be a fine book. And we laughed over it. Hemingway punched me in the mouth.
That winter Picasso lived on the Rue d'Barque, and he had just painted a picture of a naked dental hygenist in the middle of the Gobi Desert. Gertrude Stein said it was a good picture, but not a great one, and I said it could be a fine picture. We laughed over it and Hemingway punched me in the mouth.
Francis Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald came home from their wild new years eve party. It was April. Scott had just written Great Expectations, and Gertrude Stein and I read it, and we said it was a good book, but there was no need to have written it, 'cause Charles Dickens had already written it. We laughed over it, and Hemingway punched me in the mouth.

Are you high on crack, or something?


http://www.ibras.dk/comedy/allen.htm#Lost
 
2017-04-15 01:30:48 AM  

EnglishMajor: Hey, John Belushi did a serious movie once too, most people can't name it - OK, maybe not serious, but a sort of romantic film. Blair Brown, yummy!

"Continental Divide."  It's actually a very good movie.


Seconded.
 
2017-04-15 04:47:01 AM  

EdwardTellerhands: Billy Liar: Raymond Chandler volunteered, age 28 or 29, in the Canadian services, and fought in France.  Afterward, he came back to the US and scribbled a few lines for a living.

I wonder how he ranked as an oil-company exec. We need critical biographies of Wallace Stevens the insurance executive, Rimbaud the coffee trader, etc.


Melville the customs agent...
 
2017-04-15 04:59:14 AM  

PunGent: EdwardTellerhands: Billy Liar: Raymond Chandler volunteered, age 28 or 29, in the Canadian services, and fought in France.  Afterward, he came back to the US and scribbled a few lines for a living.

I wonder how he ranked as an oil-company exec. We need critical biographies of Wallace Stevens the insurance executive, Rimbaud the coffee trader, etc.

Melville the customs agent...

T.S. Eliot, bank clerk...
 
2017-04-15 12:05:02 PM  
IIRC, Walt Disney was also a WW1 ambulance driver, but he never made it to the front.
 
2017-04-15 12:30:18 PM  

EdwardTellerhands: PunGent: EdwardTellerhands: Billy Liar: Raymond Chandler volunteered, age 28 or 29, in the Canadian services, and fought in France.  Afterward, he came back to the US and scribbled a few lines for a living.

I wonder how he ranked as an oil-company exec. We need critical biographies of Wallace Stevens the insurance executive, Rimbaud the coffee trader, etc.

Melville the customs agent...
T.S. Eliot, bank clerk...


I'd like to see Franz Kafka's performance review from his insurance clerk gig.
 
2017-04-15 04:28:03 PM  

Billy Liar: EdwardTellerhands: PunGent: EdwardTellerhands: Billy Liar: Raymond Chandler volunteered, age 28 or 29, in the Canadian services, and fought in France.  Afterward, he came back to the US and scribbled a few lines for a living.

I wonder how he ranked as an oil-company exec. We need critical biographies of Wallace Stevens the insurance executive, Rimbaud the coffee trader, etc.

Melville the customs agent...
T.S. Eliot, bank clerk...

I'd like to see Franz Kafka's performance review from his insurance clerk gig.


Given how well he portrayed twisted, tortured, inhuman bureaucracy, I'm sure he did quite well :)
 
2017-04-15 07:07:31 PM  

EdwardTellerhands: PunGent: EdwardTellerhands: Billy Liar: Raymond Chandler volunteered, age 28 or 29, in the Canadian services, and fought in France.  Afterward, he came back to the US and scribbled a few lines for a living.

I wonder how he ranked as an oil-company exec. We need critical biographies of Wallace Stevens the insurance executive, Rimbaud the coffee trader, etc.

Melville the customs agent...
T.S. Eliot, bank clerk...


Kurt Vonnegut, Saab dealer.
 
2017-04-15 09:00:53 PM  

jake_lex: EdwardTellerhands: PunGent: EdwardTellerhands: Billy Liar: Raymond Chandler volunteered, age 28 or 29, in the Canadian services, and fought in France.  Afterward, he came back to the US and scribbled a few lines for a living.

I wonder how he ranked as an oil-company exec. We need critical biographies of Wallace Stevens the insurance executive, Rimbaud the coffee trader, etc.

Melville the customs agent...
T.S. Eliot, bank clerk...

Kurt Vonnegut, Saab dealer.


was he really? that's perfect.
also, Philip Glass as cabdriver. I picture him circling one block endlessly at 2 mph.
 
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