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(ESPN)   Here is the story of the rise and fall of America's first sports-only college, which is sort of kept alive today at most Division I schools   ( espn.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, For-profit school, Forest Trail, Gifty Chung, Crown College, Whenever We Wanted, John Mellencamp, Riko Chung  
•       •       •

1180 clicks; posted to Sports » on 14 Apr 2017 at 12:50 PM (27 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2017-04-14 11:50:53 AM  
So. . .this is basically an athletic club with high membership fees?
 
2017-04-14 12:18:21 PM  

Lord Jubjub: So. . .this is basically an athletic club with high membership fees?


Pretty much I would think.
 
2017-04-14 12:19:02 PM  

Lord Jubjub: So. . .this is basically an athletic club with high membership fees?


That was my first thought. Doesn't this already exist everywhere, but without "University" slapped on there, and for significantly less money?
 
2017-04-14 01:16:38 PM  
That story wasn't about UNC and I am now confused.
 
2017-04-14 01:22:30 PM  
The most amazing part of it all is that it isn't in Texas.
 
2017-04-14 01:31:49 PM  
I thought I remembered reading about another school which pretty much existed just to get paid to play visiting basketball games. Although I think they had online courses players could take so maybe it wasn't technically sports only.
 
2017-04-14 02:00:20 PM  
I still don't know why there isn't a "sports performance" degree available at universities. Rather than force elite athletes to have to pretend to care about a "real" major, offer classes in career management, dealing with agents, money management, training techniques, after-career planning, etc. They still would need to take the basic breadth requirements since those are basic quality-of-life things.

It would be akin to music performance majors or other such things. "I studied piano at Juliard." "I studied film at USC." "I studied football at Michigan." Let's acknowledge that professional spots is a career path that needs real preparation too.
 
2017-04-14 02:04:12 PM  
Only in the United States of Avarice.
 
2017-04-14 02:16:24 PM  

DrewCurtisJr: I thought I remembered reading about another school which pretty much existed just to get paid to play visiting basketball games. Although I think they had online courses players could take so maybe it wasn't technically sports only.


In theory, this thing also had the students take on-line courses from another university.  In theory.

This concept doesn't sound horrible, frankly.  It just needs to be run by professionals and not asshats.
 
2017-04-14 02:31:04 PM  

JayCab: I still don't know why there isn't a "sports performance" degree available at universities. Rather than force elite athletes to have to pretend to care about a "real" major, offer classes in career management, dealing with agents, money management, training techniques, after-career planning, etc. They still would need to take the basic breadth requirements since those are basic quality-of-life things.

It would be akin to music performance majors or other such things. "I studied piano at Juliard." "I studied film at USC." "I studied football at Michigan." Let's acknowledge that professional spots is a career path that needs real preparation too.


Exactly.  Every junior high, high school, juco, etc. needs phys ed teachers and coaches for their athletic programs, so make it a legitimate B.A. degree. Or at least make it a minor for some other field of study.

The NCAA wants to still convince the public that student-athletes are these young plucky academics who just so happen to excel in a particular athletic endeavor rather than just hired guns who are biding their time.  To be fair, the issue of going pro is really only a big concern for football, men's basketball, and baseball (there aren't enough hockey programs in the NCAA to worry about), and the vast majority of athletes aren't making a professional roster, but at least this way, it gives them a legit field of study, and hell, to be honest, even as a non-athlete, I'd be interested in taking some of the courses myself to at least know the business of sports.
 
2017-04-14 03:57:42 PM  
So wait, a college where you don't actually take classes and just play sports?

a.espncdn.com

Approves
 
2017-04-14 04:00:24 PM  
Particularly the way Eidschun framed the pitch, the Forest Trail idea had enormous appeal to high school athletes who hadn't quite demonstrated the combination of skills and grades to land a scholarship but who desperately wanted to hang on to their dreams -- and it resonated with their parents too. Maybe a grad just needed another year or two to grow into his or her body. Or to fine-tune a mechanical adjustment. Or to buckle down and study. Or just to get noticed by the right D2 coach. Who wouldn't believe that about their kid?

And that right there is what it's all about. That's how they separate families from their money -- zeroing in on the parents who haven't yet figured out that their kids aren't the all-world athletes they think they are. Maybe a little success here and there, like a high school all-conference nod, has made them think they just need the right break to become scholarship material, or future pros. It's as predatory as that other fake online "university" mentioned in the article.
 
2017-04-14 04:14:22 PM  
Winston University?

http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/winston-university/n9203​?​snl=1

/if you tell anyone, we'll find you, and we'll kill you.
 
2017-04-14 05:52:14 PM  

JayCab: I still don't know why there isn't a "sports performance" degree available at universities. Rather than force elite athletes to have to pretend to care about a "real" major, offer classes in career management, dealing with agents, money management, training techniques, after-career planning, etc. They still would need to take the basic breadth requirements since those are basic quality-of-life things.

It would be akin to music performance majors or other such things. "I studied piano at Juliard." "I studied film at USC." "I studied football at Michigan." Let's acknowledge that professional spots is a career path that needs real preparation too.


Or they could just pay the players
 
2017-04-14 06:30:52 PM  

JAGChem82: Exactly. Every junior high, high school, juco, etc. needs phys ed teachers and coaches for their athletic programs, so make it a legitimate B.A. degree. Or at least make it a minor for some other field of study.


Would probably translate well to working at an exercise gym too.
 
2017-04-14 10:27:32 PM  

ElwoodCuse: JayCab: I still don't know why there isn't a "sports performance" degree available at universities. Rather than force elite athletes to have to pretend to care about a "real" major, offer classes in career management, dealing with agents, money management, training techniques, after-career planning, etc. They still would need to take the basic breadth requirements since those are basic quality-of-life things.

It would be akin to music performance majors or other such things. "I studied piano at Juliard." "I studied film at USC." "I studied football at Michigan." Let's acknowledge that professional spots is a career path that needs real preparation too.

Or they could just pay the players


The two are not mutually exclusive. Paying the players a fair share based on what they bring into the university still doesn't do anything to prepare them for their careers, and there would still be the sham of academic requirements.
 
2017-04-14 10:54:43 PM  
I don't know what you're on about, Subby.  SMU still exists.


/They built their first football stadium before their first library
//Not joking about that.
 
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