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(Tor.com)   Piers Anthony's Xanth novels to become feature film and TV series; Roman Polanski and Woody Allen hope to direct   ( tor.com) divider line
    More: Sick, Film, long-running fantasy saga, Xanth, SP Entertainment Group, Producer Steven Paul, Xanth series, Xanth novels, evil magician Trent  
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2086 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 14 Apr 2017 at 11:20 AM (31 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-04-14 09:42:40 AM  
To be fair, the nookie in those novels was pretty age-appropriate.  The teenagers got it on with the teenagers, and the adults got it on with the adults.  There was some cross-generational flirting and awkward moments (cue Sigmund Freud in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure) but nothing more than that.
 
2017-04-14 09:45:38 AM  
I loved these novels as a kid. Probably why I love puns so much . I approve. This should be fun :)
 
2017-04-14 09:46:02 AM  

FrancoFile: To be fair, the nookie in those novels was pretty age-appropriate.  The teenagers got it on with the teenagers, and the adults got it on with the adults.  There was some cross-generational flirting and awkward moments (cue Sigmund Freud in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure) but nothing more than that.


There did seem to be way too much fixation on the color of girls' panties though, if I recall correctly.
 
2017-04-14 09:58:10 AM  
I read all of his stuff till he started with the pedo themes. Then it just grossed me out to read his work from then on.
I think it was in sixth book of the on a pale horse series that he began introducing the child sex stuff. Yuck.
 
2017-04-14 09:58:13 AM  

FrancoFile: To be fair, the nookie in those novels was pretty age-appropriate.  The teenagers got it on with the teenagers, and the adults got it on with the adults.  There was some cross-generational flirting and awkward moments (cue Sigmund Freud in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure) but nothing more than that.


*CoughPedoCough*

https://litreactor.com/columns/themes-of-pedophilia-in-the-works-of-p​i​ers-anthony
 
2017-04-14 10:03:23 AM  

JustToLetYouKnowFriend: FrancoFile: To be fair, the nookie in those novels was pretty age-appropriate.  The teenagers got it on with the teenagers, and the adults got it on with the adults.  There was some cross-generational flirting and awkward moments (cue Sigmund Freud in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure) but nothing more than that.

*CoughPedoCough*

https://litreactor.com/columns/themes-of-pedophilia-in-the-works-of-pi​ers-anthony


Jeebus. Wow. Ick, Dammit.

Well, guess it's just the MYTH books and Discworld for the boys as they get older.
 
2017-04-14 10:17:58 AM  
pmchollywoodlife.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2017-04-14 10:41:31 AM  
That guy sucks and thank god CNN cancelled his show.
 
2017-04-14 11:02:34 AM  
I has a sad now. I loved the Xanth books as a kid. I only read a few of his other books, so I had no idea about the pedo stuff. Though now that I think about it, I read one of his scifi/fantasy novels that paired a teen girl with a history of sexual abuse with an older man. I guess when I read it, I was too young to understand it was a pattern in his writing. I do remember being a bit squicked out by the character detailing how she had been abused.
 
2017-04-14 11:15:53 AM  

JustToLetYouKnowFriend: FrancoFile: To be fair, the nookie in those novels was pretty age-appropriate.  The teenagers got it on with the teenagers, and the adults got it on with the adults.  There was some cross-generational flirting and awkward moments (cue Sigmund Freud in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure) but nothing more than that.

*CoughPedoCough*

https://litreactor.com/columns/themes-of-pedophilia-in-the-works-of-pi​ers-anthony


Before we split, an ex-gf of mine tried to introduce me to the Xanth series. The lighthearted way it tried to describe certain scenarios seemed unsettling to me in a way that I couldn't quite shake and I gave her back the books shortly after.

Now I can see why I was unsettled if that was just a vague hint of the shiat he was pushing in other books
 
2017-04-14 11:30:04 AM  
It's not just the questionably-appropriate-age factor. Anthony is up there with Robert Heinlein on the list of authors who just plain cannot write female characters in a way that doesn't make me feel like I need a shower. (I know, I know; "a speculative-fiction writer who has issues with women? You don't say!")
 
2017-04-14 11:35:41 AM  

Ambivalence: FrancoFile: To be fair, the nookie in those novels was pretty age-appropriate.  The teenagers got it on with the teenagers, and the adults got it on with the adults.  There was some cross-generational flirting and awkward moments (cue Sigmund Freud in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure) but nothing more than that.

There did seem to be way too much fixation on the color of girls' panties though, if I recall correctly.


That seems pretty age appropriate.
 
2017-04-14 11:39:01 AM  

TruBluTroll: I has a sad now. I loved the Xanth books as a kid. I only read a few of his other books, so I had no idea about the pedo stuff. Though now that I think about it, I read one of his scifi/fantasy novels that paired a teen girl with a history of sexual abuse with an older man. I guess when I read it, I was too young to understand it was a pattern in his writing. I do remember being a bit squicked out by the character detailing how she had been abused.


Yeah, Xanth was mostly just light-hearted fluff.  I read some of his other series too, but The Bio of a Space Tyrant series was the most explicitly squick of them, however, and really turned me off from his stuff.
 
2017-04-14 11:39:44 AM  
Pity, probably my least favorite of his series. The Incarnations of Immortality are much superior.
 
2017-04-14 11:45:37 AM  
Loved the first few Xanth (I was in my early teens and loved puns) and Incarnations (late teens, liked the concept) books. Then as I got older and read more of his stuff I began noticing the pedo stuff.  That was it, no more. I never finished the Incarnations series and haven't looked at his stuff again.

/If they do this they should get Stephen Collins and Jeffrey Jones to appear in it.
 
2017-04-14 11:48:40 AM  
Just as long as they stick with Xanth for film.

His firefly novel on the other hand.....
 
2017-04-14 11:49:43 AM  

JustToLetYouKnowFriend: FrancoFile: To be fair, the nookie in those novels was pretty age-appropriate.  The teenagers got it on with the teenagers, and the adults got it on with the adults.  There was some cross-generational flirting and awkward moments (cue Sigmund Freud in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure) but nothing more than that.

*CoughPedoCough*

https://litreactor.com/columns/themes-of-pedophilia-in-the-works-of-pi​ers-anthony


Should not have clicked that link.

/needs a shower
 
2017-04-14 11:52:24 AM  
I'd watch a tv series based on any of his book serieseseses. 
Xanth
Incarnations of Immortality
Bio of a Space Tyrant
Apprentice Adept
Tarot
Jason Striker
pictures.abebooks.comView Full Size

But Pornucopia was by far the raunchiest.
i.ebayimg.comView Full Size
 
2017-04-14 11:53:33 AM  
I tell my friends to start with A Spell For Chameleon and stop whenever they feel like. If it's after 30 books or 30 pages, when you've had enough Anthony, there's no point in going on.

The Incarnations series is actually very good (at least through book 4, 5 disappointed and I haven't read 6 or 7) and stands out to me as one of the only fantasy series with both advanced technology and openly known magic (unlike, say, Harry Potter, which has advanced technology, but magic is a secret world) which is a genre I'd like to see more people try and develop.
 
2017-04-14 12:00:13 PM  

nmrsnr: I tell my friends to start with A Spell For Chameleon and stop whenever they feel like. If it's after 30 books or 30 pages, when you've had enough Anthony, there's no point in going on.

The Incarnations series is actually very good (at least through book 4, 5 disappointed and I haven't read 6 or 7) and stands out to me as one of the only fantasy series with both advanced technology and openly known magic (unlike, say, Harry Potter, which has advanced technology, but magic is a secret world) which is a genre I'd like to see more people try and develop.


You should pick up China Mieville's Bas-Lag novels (start with Perdido Street Station).  But be prepared for an entirely different experience altogether.  Going from Anthony to Mieville is quite a jump.
 
2017-04-14 12:03:47 PM  

FrancoFile: To be fair, the nookie in those novels was pretty age-appropriate.  The teenagers got it on with the teenagers, and the adults got it on with the adults.  There was some cross-generational flirting and awkward moments (cue Sigmund Freud in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure) but nothing more than that.


Uhh, you're leaving out that they told you (on tv theyd show you?) how centaurs, minotaurs and the like were created.  I don't think thats safe for children or adults.
 
2017-04-14 12:04:47 PM  
I used to love Piers Anthony books when I was growing up.  I have no recollection of where in the Xanth series I stopped reading but in looking at the list of books in the series, a lot of the titles don't ring a bell at all.  I remember really liking the Incarnations of Immortality series.
 
2017-04-14 12:07:27 PM  

Vasectomysaurus: It's not just the questionably-appropriate-age factor. Anthony is up there with Robert Heinlein on the list of authors who just plain cannot write female characters in a way that doesn't make me feel like I need a shower. (I know, I know; "a speculative-fiction writer who has issues with women? You don't say!")


Yeah, I get frustrated because plenty of good writers can stumble at times but then you see their competition and are horrified. I am currently reading Mark Oshiro's take on the Discworld series and he does bring up a few things I admit it could handle better (primarily how weak all male/female relationships are treated at the start as if being painfully awkward and seeing women as unknowable is the norm, making everyone from Rincewind to Sam Vimes fall to pieces in the presence of the opposite sex) and similarly know plenty I have issues with in Pratchett's work (the deep-downer dwarves in the last few books are... questionable social commentary.) Then I remember Piers Anthony exists and I can't flog Discworld too much.

Sort of like how Michael Moorcock ain't perfect but then you remember John Norman's Gor series was its chief competition.
 
2017-04-14 12:09:50 PM  
I'd rather they'd do Robert Asprin's Myth-Adventures.
 
2017-04-14 12:10:44 PM  
Pier Xanthony?
 
2017-04-14 12:11:23 PM  

JDJoeE: Uhh, you're leaving out that they told you (on tv theyd show you?) how centaurs, minotaurs and the like were created.  I don't think thats safe for children or adults.


The woman and horse look lovingly into each other's eyes.
<fade to black>
End scene.
 
2017-04-14 12:14:31 PM  

Grungehamster: all male/female relationships are treated at the start as if being painfully awkward and seeing women as unknowable is the norm


Is it not?

(Probably more common than you think.)

making everyone from Rincewind to Sam Vimes fall to pieces in the presence of the opposite sex

I don't remember Vimes ever falling to pieces...?
 
2017-04-14 12:15:55 PM  

PlaidJaguar: Bio of a Space Tyrant series was the most explicitly squick of them, however, and really turned me off from his stuff.


Good, it's not just me.  My friends loved Xanth back in our D&D days, but for me they were just time-fillers between Myth Adventures books.  But after reading Bio, I never went back to Xanth.

Then I discovered Discworld.  And then the murders began.
 
2017-04-14 12:17:44 PM  

Grungehamster: Vasectomysaurus: It's not just the questionably-appropriate-age factor. Anthony is up there with Robert Heinlein on the list of authors who just plain cannot write female characters in a way that doesn't make me feel like I need a shower. (I know, I know; "a speculative-fiction writer who has issues with women? You don't say!")

Yeah, I get frustrated because plenty of good writers can stumble at times but then you see their competition and are horrified. I am currently reading Mark Oshiro's take on the Discworld series and he does bring up a few things I admit it could handle better (primarily how weak all male/female relationships are treated at the start as if being painfully awkward and seeing women as unknowable is the norm, making everyone from Rincewind to Sam Vimes fall to pieces in the presence of the opposite sex) and similarly know plenty I have issues with in Pratchett's work (the deep-downer dwarves in the last few books are... questionable social commentary.) Then I remember Piers Anthony exists and I can't flog Discworld too much.

Sort of like how Michael Moorcock ain't perfect but then you remember John Norman's Gor series was its chief competition.


Fun fact: "Oshiro" is Japanese for "derierre".
 
2017-04-14 12:18:41 PM  

skyotter: PlaidJaguar: Bio of a Space Tyrant series was the most explicitly squick of them, however, and really turned me off from his stuff.

Good, it's not just me.  My friends loved Xanth back in our D&D days, but for me they were just time-fillers between Myth Adventures books.  But after reading Bio, I never went back to Xanth.

Then I discovered Discworld.  And then the murders began.


That almost entirely matches my progression, though I did the Wheel of Time (which at the time was 5 books) before my High School librarian pointed me to the Disc.

/Ook.
 
2017-04-14 12:18:46 PM  
As a kid I loved the Xanth books, and got as far as Dragon on a Pedestal and kind of lost interest. Incarnations of Immortality kind of went that way too--I never got past Being a Green Mother. But then again, putting DOWN Piers Anthony is kind of the point. There's a saturation point with his stuff. I remember when The Color of Her Panties came out, and just rolled my eyes at how Gottverdammt obvious it was by that time. 

nmrsnr:
The Incarnations series is actually very good (at least through book 4, 5 disappointed and I haven't read 6 or 7) and stands out to me as one of the only fantasy series with both advanced technology and openly known magic (unlike, say, Harry Potter, which has advanced technology, but magic is a secret world) which is a genre I'd like to see more people try and develop.

Anthony also did the Apprentice Adept series, which was both science fiction and fantasy, albeit separated. It's been done before, with varying degrees of success, but Anthony was an early pioneer, and On a Pale Horse did sort of kickstart Urban Fantasy. And at creeping out readers who GOT that he had a predilection for throwing young girls at heroes.
 
2017-04-14 12:20:50 PM  

sithon: I read all of his stuff till he started with the pedo themes. Then it just grossed me out to read his work from then on.
I think it was in sixth book of the on a pale horse series that he began introducing the child sex stuff. Yuck.


Examples? I don't remember anything like that in that series (Incarnations of Immortality.)
 
2017-04-14 12:30:35 PM  
I read the first four books as a teenager and thought they were pretty good.  Then I started reading the fifth and I realized it was just a rehash of the others with the kids being the protagonists.

And that was it for Mr. Anthony and my library.
 
2017-04-14 12:32:56 PM  

natazha: Pity, probably my least favorite of his series. The Incarnations of Immortality are much superior.


The first 3 were good but quickly seemed to go downhill.  I stopped after Being a Green Mother (I nearly threw the book across the room when Natasha revealed himself).

I remember liking most of the first 3 Adept books but not enough to read any more of them.  I also vaguely remember liking Tarot.

I liked the *idea* of the Xanth novels but the puns drove me nuts and I absolutely despised Chamelon's character (real subtle, Anthony), and there was always the lingering pedo stuff.
 
2017-04-14 12:36:29 PM  

PlaidJaguar: Wheel of Time


Rumor is it was Amazon that bought the rights to adapt WoT into a TV series.
 
2017-04-14 12:42:19 PM  

Telos: Grungehamster: all male/female relationships are treated at the start as if being painfully awkward and seeing women as unknowable is the norm

Is it not?

(Probably more common than you think.)

making everyone from Rincewind to Sam Vimes fall to pieces in the presence of the opposite sex

I don't remember Vimes ever falling to pieces...?


When he first meets Sybil he is incredibly awkward with her in Guards! Guards!

It was less that this does happen (because that is truth in fiction) and more that this dynamic repeats consistently throughout the early novels that male character meets female character and their is awkward tension (always on the male side, sometimes on the female side) due to their respective sexes.

I can't wait until he meets Moist von Lipwig and Adora Belle Dearheart because they subvert this to a significant degree. Moist has zero problem with dealing with women (hell, he's sexually experienced which feels novel for male characters in the series) but he seeks out Spike in part because she challenges his comfort and he likes that element of their dynamic.
 
2017-04-14 01:08:13 PM  
ort of like how Michael Moorcock ain't perfect but then you remember John Norman's Gor series was its chief competition.

Creepy slave girl stuff aside, the Gor books were pretty well written for the genre and featured some fairly extensive world building. I used to just skip the slave stuff (as much as possible anyway) as a kid and never even bothered to read the non Tarl Cabot entries. But the first 7 or so could easily be made more PC for an adaptation and lose nothing.
 
2017-04-14 01:11:50 PM  
Do this one instead...
i1079.photobucket.comView Full Size
 
2017-04-14 01:20:50 PM  

Telos: sithon: I read all of his stuff till he started with the pedo themes. Then it just grossed me out to read his work from then on.
I think it was in sixth book of the on a pale horse series that he began introducing the child sex stuff. Yuck.

Examples? I don't remember anything like that in that series (Incarnations of Immortality.)


I don't remember that either, and I read all of them (except the newest one, which is apparently super-porny).
I do remember thinking how weird it was that he used any excuse to get his female characters naked, and he especially had a thing for having mother and daughter characters get naked together.
 
2017-04-14 01:29:52 PM  

JDJoeE: FrancoFile: To be fair, the nookie in those novels was pretty age-appropriate.  The teenagers got it on with the teenagers, and the adults got it on with the adults.  There was some cross-generational flirting and awkward moments (cue Sigmund Freud in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure) but nothing more than that.

Uhh, you're leaving out that they told you (on tv theyd show you?) how centaurs, minotaurs and the like were created.  I don't think thats safe for children or adults.


Meh, I'd already read most of Greek mythology by then.
 
2017-04-14 01:42:29 PM  
The first Xanth book I read was Deamons Don't Dream.  I was totally confused as to what was happening.  Then I read The Color of Her Panties, which made DDD make sense.  It was then I realized I started with book 16 in the series and then followed it up with #15.

I'm not very book smart.
 
2017-04-14 01:47:30 PM  

Rev. Skarekroe: Telos: sithon: I read all of his stuff till he started with the pedo themes. Then it just grossed me out to read his work from then on.
I think it was in sixth book of the on a pale horse series that he began introducing the child sex stuff. Yuck.

Examples? I don't remember anything like that in that series (Incarnations of Immortality.)

I don't remember that either, and I read all of them (except the newest one, which is apparently super-porny).
I do remember thinking how weird it was that he used any excuse to get his female characters naked, and he especially had a thing for having mother and daughter characters get naked together.


The judge character and the child prostitute come to mind.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/And_Eternity
 
2017-04-14 01:47:42 PM  

Irving Maimway: Well, guess it's just the MYTH books and Discworld for the boys as they get older.


Hard to go wrong with Pratchett. =D

(Seriously though those books were a massive influence on my outlook on life-he's a good guiding star for growing kids, I think.)
 
2017-04-14 01:54:46 PM  
Wait till Macroscope makes the big screen. In-between the sort-of-hard SF, there's that Voyager episode on steroids. There's a whole range of late 60s/early 70s SF that is ripe for the picking, if Hollywood thinks they can make money on the weird-as-possible train.
 
2017-04-14 01:55:26 PM  

AlfalfaMale: Do this one instead...
[i1079.photobucket.com image 283x475]


Second that!
 
2017-04-14 02:05:34 PM  
Not sure why the sick tag.
It's mostly just pulpy fantasy fiction for teens done decently for what it is i think.
Decently enough it's more palatable as an adult, than a good deal of what i read as a teen is now.
So nothing amazballs, kind of just high quality of the average really, But not sick or facepalm levels of low that i can see.
 
2017-04-14 02:10:31 PM  
I picked up the entire Cluster series for free during a publisher Kindle sale. I read the first book, and haven't looked at any of the rest. The main guy is the worst Gary Stu ever. A literal hyperintelligent cave-man alpha male who is the most important human in the galaxy. He travels to other planets by beaming his consciousness across space and posessing the body of some alien being with no mental defenses. And then proceeds to fark shiat up and rape his way around, while declaring that he's on a critical mission.
 
2017-04-14 02:11:54 PM  

Grungehamster: Telos: Grungehamster: all male/female relationships are treated at the start as if being painfully awkward and seeing women as unknowable is the norm

Is it not?

(Probably more common than you think.)

making everyone from Rincewind to Sam Vimes fall to pieces in the presence of the opposite sex

I don't remember Vimes ever falling to pieces...?

When he first meets Sybil he is incredibly awkward with her in Guards! Guards!

It was less that this does happen (because that is truth in fiction) and more that this dynamic repeats consistently throughout the early novels that male character meets female character and their is awkward tension (always on the male side, sometimes on the female side) due to their respective sexes.

I can't wait until he meets Moist von Lipwig and Adora Belle Dearheart because they subvert this to a significant degree. Moist has zero problem with dealing with women (hell, he's sexually experienced which feels novel for male characters in the series) but he seeks out Spike in part because she challenges his comfort and he likes that element of their dynamic.


And even by Night Watch Vimes still has difficulties dealing with female matters (Sybil) although he can be thoughtlessly crude with Rosie Palm. And as much of the tension between Vimes & Sybil in Guards!, Guards! is a matter of class distinctions as it is male/female tensions.

As an aside, I'm embarking on my annual listening of the audiobook version of Night Watch well before the Glorious 25th. This is a book that deserves a movie treatment.
 
2017-04-14 02:12:53 PM  

Telos: sithon: I read all of his stuff till he started with the pedo themes. Then it just grossed me out to read his work from then on.
I think it was in sixth book of the on a pale horse series that he began introducing the child sex stuff. Yuck.

Examples? I don't remember anything like that in that series (Incarnations of Immortality.)


I don't recall anything like that really popping until the 7th book, And Eternity, which was about replacing God.
 
2017-04-14 02:13:06 PM  
When you have sold as many books as he has, maybe then you can complain about his writing.

/you do realize most of the ideas come from his fans, dontchaknow?
 
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