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(Stuff.co.nz)   Have you been duped again by another so-called "30-minute" recipe? Here's how to really get a meal on the table fast   ( stuff.co.nz) divider line
    More: Interesting, Cooking, 30-minute preparation time, certain 30-minute estimates, late sports practice, Nutrition, speedy weeknight cooking, Healthy work lunches, Include instant flavour  
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2246 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 14 Apr 2017 at 3:20 PM (31 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-04-14 01:44:35 PM  
I really don't know how to do a quick meal unless it's like a salad and grilled cheese or pasta or something easy so I am going to be stalking this thread.
 
2017-04-14 02:43:08 PM  
Marinara-20 minutes. Add meat, browned, if desires. Lots of other easy additions.
Check out marco white's knorr series youtube vids for other quick and easy dishes.

/my go-to...raised in heavily Italian town.
 
2017-04-14 02:50:40 PM  

ginandbacon: I really don't know how to do a quick meal unless it's like a salad and grilled cheese or pasta or something easy so I am going to be stalking this thread.


Rice takes 20 minutes. How much can yo chop, sear, or blanch or steam in that time frame? Same with mashed taters. I know you can sear a steak in that time, and for damn sure can blanch vegetables in that time frame. A quick pan sauce from the steak or pork or even chicken while the carbs are doing their thing, and it's easy peasy time.

Paella? Doesn't take that long. Carbonara certainly doesn't take very long. Heck, a great many Italian dishes are quick and easy. Caprese takes literally a few minutes, and that's a single course. Bread and olive oil, and a quick and easy tapanade and you've extended the time to get food on the table--or even just a simple olive and pepper salad.

Damn near any stir fry takes less time to cook than cutting everything, and you get the pan warmed up as you get the last of the protein cut.

Polenta takes about 20 minutes, and you can do it ahead of time so that it's just a matter of cut and sear/fry or whatever. You can whip up corn muffins/cornbread in about about half an hour, with maybe 5-10 minutes of mixing and throwing together, and 20 minutes of cook time. While they're baking, it's not hard to pan fry some fish, kill a mess of greens with some bacon and apple cider vinegar, and even do a quick lemon-butter.

Some frozen fruit, some honey, a touch of rum, and you've got a quick and dirty sorbet in the time it takes to run it through a food processor. Heck, you can make that right before dinner, and set it into a plastic bowl and dessert if done, on top of bread, starch, veggies, and protein. All in half an hour. If you use your time wisely.

The only thing that can take longer than 20 minutes is the quick wash of your pans after you plate--I like to wash as I go, so that there's NOT a bunch of stuff to clean up after dinner.
 
2017-04-14 03:08:23 PM  

hubiestubert: ginandbacon: I really don't know how to do a quick meal unless it's like a salad and grilled cheese or pasta or something easy so I am going to be stalking this thread.

Rice takes 20 minutes. How much can yo chop, sear, or blanch or steam in that time frame? Same with mashed taters. I know you can sear a steak in that time, and for damn sure can blanch vegetables in that time frame. A quick pan sauce from the steak or pork or even chicken while the carbs are doing their thing, and it's easy peasy time.

Paella? Doesn't take that long. Carbonara certainly doesn't take very long. Heck, a great many Italian dishes are quick and easy. Caprese takes literally a few minutes, and that's a single course. Bread and olive oil, and a quick and easy tapanade and you've extended the time to get food on the table--or even just a simple olive and pepper salad.

Damn near any stir fry takes less time to cook than cutting everything, and you get the pan warmed up as you get the last of the protein cut.

Polenta takes about 20 minutes, and you can do it ahead of time so that it's just a matter of cut and sear/fry or whatever. You can whip up corn muffins/cornbread in about about half an hour, with maybe 5-10 minutes of mixing and throwing together, and 20 minutes of cook time. While they're baking, it's not hard to pan fry some fish, kill a mess of greens with some bacon and apple cider vinegar, and even do a quick lemon-butter.

Some frozen fruit, some honey, a touch of rum, and you've got a quick and dirty sorbet in the time it takes to run it through a food processor. Heck, you can make that right before dinner, and set it into a plastic bowl and dessert if done, on top of bread, starch, veggies, and protein. All in half an hour. If you use your time wisely.

The only thing that can take longer than 20 minutes is the quick wash of your pans after you plate--I like to wash as I go, so that there's NOT a bunch of stuff to clean up after dinner.


Somehow I never do stir frys...fries? I should do more stuff like that. I do lots of pastas. But I always seem to do big things I can reheat...

I do a ton of pastas.

I just gravitate toward peasant food and it takes a while to do most of those right. I'm going to work on branching out more.
 
2017-04-14 03:24:06 PM  
FTA: 7. Your first step when cooking should always be to preheat the oven or start boiling the water. Always.

Agreed about preheating the oven, but I don't quite get why many "quick meals" tell me to start out boiling water. Dude, its going to take me a while to peal and chop all those veggies, if I start boiling the water now, it will be half boiled away before I get to that step.
 
2017-04-14 03:27:16 PM  
If the coaches and your kids are mad at you, let them cook next time.
 
2017-04-14 03:29:11 PM  
Get EVRYONE OUT OF THE FARKING KITCHEN.

I realy dont' need "help"
 
2017-04-14 03:30:37 PM  
"Are you some kind of idiot who failed 6th grade science and is incapable of planning further than an hour ahead?"

/Calls em as I sees em.
 
2017-04-14 03:33:13 PM  

MindStalker: its going to take me a while to peal and chop all those veggies, if I start boiling the water now, it will be half boiled away before I get to that step


So put in twice as much water. As a bonus, it'll take longer to boil, so you can chop even more vegetables.
 
2017-04-14 03:35:52 PM  
Have you been duped again by another so-called "30-minute" recipe?

No.
 
2017-04-14 03:36:13 PM  
If you've arranged your life so that you're all stressed out about getting dinner cooked in 30 minutes or less, change you life.

/Koyaanisqatsi.
 
2017-04-14 03:38:28 PM  
Pan fried steaks and sauces are quick, but I always like to salt the steaks for almost an hour beforehand, anyway. I tried 10/20 minutes, and the crust/juiciness just weren't what you got when you did it for an hour. It's almost like brining.
 
2017-04-14 03:39:26 PM  

ginandbacon: hubiestubert: ginandbacon: I really don't know how to do a quick meal unless it's like a salad and grilled cheese or pasta or something easy so I am going to be stalking this thread.

Rice takes 20 minutes. How much can yo chop, sear, or blanch or steam in that time frame? Same with mashed taters. I know you can sear a steak in that time, and for damn sure can blanch vegetables in that time frame. A quick pan sauce from the steak or pork or even chicken while the carbs are doing their thing, and it's easy peasy time.

Paella? Doesn't take that long. Carbonara certainly doesn't take very long. Heck, a great many Italian dishes are quick and easy. Caprese takes literally a few minutes, and that's a single course. Bread and olive oil, and a quick and easy tapanade and you've extended the time to get food on the table--or even just a simple olive and pepper salad.

Damn near any stir fry takes less time to cook than cutting everything, and you get the pan warmed up as you get the last of the protein cut.

Polenta takes about 20 minutes, and you can do it ahead of time so that it's just a matter of cut and sear/fry or whatever. You can whip up corn muffins/cornbread in about about half an hour, with maybe 5-10 minutes of mixing and throwing together, and 20 minutes of cook time. While they're baking, it's not hard to pan fry some fish, kill a mess of greens with some bacon and apple cider vinegar, and even do a quick lemon-butter.

Some frozen fruit, some honey, a touch of rum, and you've got a quick and dirty sorbet in the time it takes to run it through a food processor. Heck, you can make that right before dinner, and set it into a plastic bowl and dessert if done, on top of bread, starch, veggies, and protein. All in half an hour. If you use your time wisely.

The only thing that can take longer than 20 minutes is the quick wash of your pans after you plate--I like to wash as I go, so that there's NOT a bunch of stuff to clean up after dinner.

Somehow I never do stir frys...fries? I should do more stuff like that. I do lots of pastas. But I always seem to do big things I can reheat...

I do a ton of pastas.

I just gravitate toward peasant food and it takes a while to do most of those right. I'm going to work on branching out more.


If I want to do something quick and good with minimal prep, I'll do penne vodka with salmon.

I can cook the salmon in a pan and heat up the sauce while the pasta is boiling. Dish up the pasta. Break up the salmon and spread it on top. Cover in vodka sauce. 10-15 minutes from the time the water starts boiling to the time the food is on my table and ready to eat.
 
2017-04-14 03:44:12 PM  

vudukungfu: Get EVRYONE OUT OF THE FARKING KITCHEN.

I realy dont' need "help"


Pretty damn much. I took over Christmas dinner last year from my housemates because...well, they were too damn slow to stop me. By the time they noticed, everything was either done, or nearly there. They set the table, and poured the wine--that I'd opened because when I'm cooking for people, a cocktail or wine IS a must. I cook, other people pour. That's the deal. I don't think it's a bad exchange.
 
2017-04-14 03:44:47 PM  
scontent.xx.fbcdn.netView Full Size

Add green salad. Total time from "hungry" to "eat" is about 15 minutes.  More if you want to salt your aubergine, which I generally do.
 
2017-04-14 03:51:06 PM  
Hey, there's a learning curve to a new recipe. While it should take less than 30 min for certain recipes, initially it's going to take longer in the beginning since you have to acquire and measure the ingredients properly the first time. I have an awesome one-pot Chicken Riggies dinner recipe that started out long, but now I can cook the whole meal under 45 minutes, and I have a visual of what the measurements look like so assembly is real easy. Plus, less clean-up since you are putting everything into one pot.
 
2017-04-14 03:51:46 PM  

hubiestubert: vudukungfu: Get EVRYONE OUT OF THE FARKING KITCHEN.

I realy dont' need "help"

Pretty damn much. I took over Christmas dinner last year from my housemates because...well, they were too damn slow to stop me. By the time they noticed, everything was either done, or nearly there. They set the table, and poured the wine--that I'd opened because when I'm cooking for people, a cocktail or wine IS a must. I cook, other people pour. That's the deal. I don't think it's a bad exchange.


In honor of Hubie, this might be a bit longer than most posts.

You probably don't know me, so some catch-up. Divorced 6 years ago, remarried 4 years ago, actively building a new life way from my hometown and everything/one I thought I would raise my family around. With a new baby, we bought a house with a pool and are setting it up to be a garden of delights to entice folks to come to us since we can't go out. I've learned to cook pretty well, I take care care of my family, in general I couldn't be happier.

It's posts like yours here that I have grabbed on to over the years and told myself "Hey, be like this. That sounds like a good life." So thanks for being you and blazing a trail. We all have to be who we are, and we get to decide who we are to a greater extent than most folks think possible.

IJustGottaBeMeFarSide.jpg
 
2017-04-14 03:54:41 PM  
The Quizzical family secret is basically to cut up meat and cook it in a pan on the stove top.  Main course in 30 min or less.  Then add some veggies (microwave), beans (from a can, microwave), or rice (rice cooker) on the side.   And on the weekends, we crockpot a big meal with lots of left overs for mid-week lunches.   Also, pasta is a pretty quick meal - we can do spaghetti or Mac and Cheese from scratch and still be ready to eat in half an hour.

Sometimes we'll bake some chicken for dinner, which takes 45-60 min.
 
2017-04-14 03:59:47 PM  
Biggest secrets to 30-minute meals:
1.  Mise en place
2.  Sharp knives (this alone will save you half the time)

I can whip up salmon, rice, & veggies or pan-fried pork chops, mashed potatoes, and veggies in less than 30 minutes--as long as I have the space and the right tools.
 
2017-04-14 04:08:36 PM  
ginandbacon:Somehow I never do stir frys...fries? I should do more stuff like that. I do lots of pastas. But I always seem to do big things I can reheat...

Stir fries are pretty much peasant cooking. I like to keep a decent supply of rice or noodles handy, just to make quick things, and pop some extra rice balls in the fridge to barely reheat later. Crust them with something like wasabi or toasted sesame seeds, and you've got something you can put on a plate with some skewers, a quick salad--or even a premade seaweed salad--some miso, and some flash pickles with rice wine vinegar. Or just start your rice early and then make rice balls to crust and cool just for a bit. Or even a quick seared trout or unagi. Fresh water fish and a pan sear or donburi style, and you've got a quick meal, that tastes great, and takes about as long as it takes to bring dashi to a boil and let it simmer for a few minutes.

Japanese peasant cooking is da bomb for quick and easy. Even the haute cuisine is relatively quick, once you have everything ready to assemble. Yeah, the pickles take time, but once you've got your batches rolling, it's easy to stay on top of to KEEP them rolling. Rice takes 20 minutes tops. The most you're looking at is some choppy-chop and setting things down to sear or grill or fry fair quickly.

Plus, rice balls make great lunches. Just form a rice ball around your meats and veggies, and you've got what amounts to a sammich.

My downfall are red bean paste buns. Steamed or baked, these will set you back a bit, because you have to let the dough rise, but Sofa King good. And the dough makes for great BBQ pork buns, or beef, or any damn thing your greasy heart desires--sweet potato FTW. Steamed or baked though, they're f*cking delicious, and once you have your dough on hand, it's not hard to keep it rolling to essentially cut off dough to make buns on the fly.
 
2017-04-14 04:16:11 PM  

hubiestubert: That's the deal. I don't think it's a bad exchange.


works for me.
My sister knows one bottle of wine is mine if I'm cooking.
Open another for me when I sit down to eat.
 
2017-04-14 04:17:59 PM  

hubiestubert: ginandbacon:Somehow I never do stir frys...fries? I should do more stuff like that. I do lots of pastas. But I always seem to do big things I can reheat...

Stir fries are pretty much peasant cooking. I like to keep a decent supply of rice or noodles handy, just to make quick things, and pop some extra rice balls in the fridge to barely reheat later. Crust them with something like wasabi or toasted sesame seeds, and you've got something you can put on a plate with some skewers, a quick salad--or even a premade seaweed salad--some miso, and some flash pickles with rice wine vinegar. Or just start your rice early and then make rice balls to crust and cool just for a bit. Or even a quick seared trout or unagi. Fresh water fish and a pan sear or donburi style, and you've got a quick meal, that tastes great, and takes about as long as it takes to bring dashi to a boil and let it simmer for a few minutes.

Japanese peasant cooking is da bomb for quick and easy. Even the haute cuisine is relatively quick, once you have everything ready to assemble. Yeah, the pickles take time, but once you've got your batches rolling, it's easy to stay on top of to KEEP them rolling. Rice takes 20 minutes tops. The most you're looking at is some choppy-chop and setting things down to sear or grill or fry fair quickly.

Plus, rice balls make great lunches. Just form a rice ball around your meats and veggies, and you've got what amounts to a sammich.

My downfall are red bean paste buns. Steamed or baked, these will set you back a bit, because you have to let the dough rise, but Sofa King good. And the dough makes for great BBQ pork buns, or beef, or any damn thing your greasy heart desires--sweet potato FTW. Steamed or baked though, they're f*cking delicious, and once you have your dough on hand, it's not hard to keep it rolling to essentially cut off dough to make buns on the fly.


I do a lot of onigiri :)
 
2017-04-14 04:22:58 PM  
Why would you ever try a new recipe when you're pressed for time?
 
2017-04-14 04:24:39 PM  
When I need to get a meal on the table fast, I grab a bag of Doritos and a can of coke.
 
2017-04-14 04:24:40 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-04-14 04:27:44 PM  

hubiestubert: ginandbacon: I really don't know how to do a quick meal unless it's like a salad and grilled cheese or pasta or something easy so I am going to be stalking this thread.

Rice takes 20 minutes. How much can yo chop, sear, or blanch or steam in that time frame? Same with mashed taters. I know you can sear a steak in that time, and for damn sure can blanch vegetables in that time frame. A quick pan sauce from the steak or pork or even chicken while the carbs are doing their thing, and it's easy peasy time.

Paella? Doesn't take that long. Carbonara certainly doesn't take very long. Heck, a great many Italian dishes are quick and easy. Caprese takes literally a few minutes, and that's a single course. Bread and olive oil, and a quick and easy tapanade and you've extended the time to get food on the table--or even just a simple olive and pepper salad.

Damn near any stir fry takes less time to cook than cutting everything, and you get the pan warmed up as you get the last of the protein cut.

Polenta takes about 20 minutes, and you can do it ahead of time so that it's just a matter of cut and sear/fry or whatever. You can whip up corn muffins/cornbread in about about half an hour, with maybe 5-10 minutes of mixing and throwing together, and 20 minutes of cook time. While they're baking, it's not hard to pan fry some fish, kill a mess of greens with some bacon and apple cider vinegar, and even do a quick lemon-butter.

Some frozen fruit, some honey, a touch of rum, and you've got a quick and dirty sorbet in the time it takes to run it through a food processor. Heck, you can make that right before dinner, and set it into a plastic bowl and dessert if done, on top of bread, starch, veggies, and protein. All in half an hour. If you use your time wisely.

The only thing that can take longer than 20 minutes is the quick wash of your pans after you plate--I like to wash as I go, so that there's NOT a bunch of stuff to clean up after dinner.


Hubie, you're a professional. Most people are not. We are slower and less sure of ourselves and have a smaller number of dishes memorized.

What you wrote above is the equivalent of me (a professional translator by trade) saying, "What's the problem with translating 1,000 words in an hour?" And yet some of the people I work with are much less experienced and struggle to do half that amount in an hour.
 
2017-04-14 04:28:52 PM  

DubyaHater: [img.fark.net image 300x300]


I watched that for longer than I should have.
 
2017-04-14 04:29:21 PM  
Who are these people who can't plan a meal to actually take half an hour?

i0.kym-cdn.comView Full Size


I mean, seriously, how hard is "don't use a recipe where consecutive steps add up to more than the time you have"?
 
2017-04-14 04:32:07 PM  
Cook off some meat when you have the time; refrigerate. Cut up carrots, onions, and celery. Put in the fridge. When you come home, throw the veggies (starting with the onion, of course) in a pan with butter and/or olive oil, get those going well, put in garlic/pepper/ginger/spices to taste, put in the meat when the veggies are near done, warm it all through, and boom, a meal. A very good meal. You can boost it with some (unsalted) beef broth and let that cook down if you want. Cooking isn't hard.
 
2017-04-14 04:33:50 PM  

ginandbacon: I do a lot of onigiri :)


Then you know. ;)

They're the perfect quick eats.

Throw some edamame beans into the rice, some ginger or even some thin sliced pepper and you've got color AND flavor, on top of some extra nutrition. In fairness, beans and peppers need a little more pressure to form right, but it doesn't take much to press with a glass or form with a towel and twist the pressure up.

I almost wish that I had the time at work to take a proper lunch, because my ass would be making bento boxes every damn morning.
 
2017-04-14 04:53:05 PM  

adj_m: "Are you some kind of idiot who failed 6th grade science and is incapable of planning further than an hour ahead?"

/Calls em as I sees em.


Yeah.  It's not like you're waiting on the edge of your seat for a phone call to tell you what you're going to have to make and be done a half hour from then.
My mom may not have been a very imaginative chef, but she had a decent repertoire of basic meals.  Both she and Dad worked, and she'd prepare what she could the night before.  Then she'd leave basic instructions for us since we got home first.  Like, when and at what temperature to put something in the oven....Worked pretty well when you don't slam one person with the whole operation.
 
2017-04-14 04:55:23 PM  

MindStalker: FTA: 7. Your first step when cooking should always be to preheat the oven or start boiling the water. Always.

Agreed about preheating the oven, but I don't quite get why many "quick meals" tell me to start out boiling water. Dude, its going to take me a while to peal and chop all those veggies, if I start boiling the water now, it will be half boiled away before I get to that step.


I love at 6000'. I'm lucky if it's boiling by the time prep is done, and even then it's not truly boiling.
 
2017-04-14 04:56:10 PM  

Nogale: Hubie, you're a professional. Most people are not. We are slower and less sure of ourselves and have a smaller number of dishes memorized.

What you wrote above is the equivalent of me (a professional translator by trade) saying, "What's the problem with translating 1,000 words in an hour?" And yet some of the people I work with are much less experienced and struggle to do half that amount in an hour.


Cooking is just a matter of practice. And a lot of people let themselves get intimidated in the kitchen. That they HAVE to be a professional to try stuff. And that is just BS. Have a good time in the kitchen. Try stuff that you think is going to be fun. Try stuff you want to try--maybe because you think it's going to be hard. Technique comes from practice. Pure and simple. You can't do a perfect omelet? Then practice a bit, because once you get the feel for that moment when the pan is going to release, and the eggs are going to flip, you just need to hone the timing and heat. And then it's easy. And you can impress the folks who haven't mastered it, but want you to cook their eggs for them.

It's like bread. Which, in fairness, which intimidated the crap out of me for years, because I worked with some amazing bakers. But baking is a fairly exact science, and once you get the proportions down, it's a lot easier. Practice is all most folks need. And to let go of the idea that you NEED to be perfect.

Make mistakes. It's food, so generally, if you screw up and it's not pretty, chances are it's still going to edible, so you make them disappear, learn from them, and move on. Have a good time in the kitchen. That's the one thing that urge people to do. Have fun. Make mistakes. Eat those mistakes. My last tamago was a disaster. Didn't have really the right pan, thought I'd wing it, and I learned a lot from the process. And while it was ugly as sin, it was still tasty. That's half the fun. Even if it's ugly, chances are it's edible. And if you have kids, you don't have to be perfect to try new stuff. And it's good for kids to see YOU trying new things. They learn what's OK from watching you.

The only way to improve your knife skills is to chop more stuff. To get a feel for each ingredient, to understand how your favorite knife actually performs. To get confident in your own abilities. To learn from your mistakes. Yeah, I make a lot of things look easy, but that's because I have a several hundred thousand meals under my belt more than most folks. I do 70-150 covers on my station--and up to 350 in the course of a day--and that adds up. Plus the prep work that goes into the day. But that doesn't mean that the techniques are impossible to learn. It just means that folks need to practice a bit. Yes, I'm probably going to dust you boning a chicken, and do it without dulling my knife overly much because I can feel where the bones are, and hit the spot between them fairly easily, but that comes with practice, and the amount of practice you need isn't all the great. Poaching eggs is about timing, and that just takes a little practice. Same with most sauces. Once you get a feel for how the sauce comes together, it becomes second nature fairly quickly. Same with grilling. Same with breads. Same with desserts. It just takes practice, and if you treat your meals as exactly that, then that takes a lot of pressure off.

Have fun with your food. Be goofy with it. Make mistakes. Be messy. Take your time in order to get it right, and then speed up at your own pace. And never apologize or try to make excuses if you don't have something down. It just takes time, and you have to give yourself the slack to get that under your belt.
 
2017-04-14 05:03:18 PM  

feanorn: Cook off some meat when you have the time; refrigerate. Cut up carrots, onions, and celery. Put in the fridge. When you come home, throw the veggies (starting with the onion, of course) in a pan with butter and/or olive oil, get those going well, put in garlic/pepper/ginger/spices to taste, put in the meat when the veggies are near done, warm it all through, and boom, a meal. A very good meal. You can boost it with some (unsalted) beef broth and let that cook down if you want. Cooking isn't hard.


That's another peeve. It doesn't need to be a huge production every night. If it does, that's your choice. When I was single I spent an hour on Sunday night doing prep and thinking the week out, and could easily make a 30 minute meal every night with zero though or effort.
 
2017-04-14 05:12:54 PM  
Really, the author couldn't have started prepping the meal earlier? Here's an idea: try out the recipe before cooking it within a time constraint.

Of course, if you're really pressed for time... leftovers + microwave = fast and easy as f*ck.
 
2017-04-14 05:21:27 PM  

hubiestubert: Cooking is just a matter of practice. And a lot of people let themselves get intimidated in the kitchen. That they HAVE to be a professional to try stuff. And that is just BS. Have a good time in the kitchen.


Besides what you said, I think a lot of people get too hung up on following a recipe.  They're measuring salt and paprika when they should be tailoring it to their own taste.  And they're not learning and understanding a technique, they're learning a recipe.  If you cook that way, it's never going to be fun.
 
2017-04-14 05:26:06 PM  
Hot and ready pizza.
 
2017-04-14 05:54:13 PM  

hubiestubert: Poaching eggs is about timing, and that just takes a little practice.


Did I ever tell you about the nightmare I had where I'm sitting having a bloody and a waitress friend of mine comes over and asks me to help out her chef because the sous had cut himself and ended up in the ER? I walk back into the kitchen, meet the chef, who says to me, "Okay, so I need you to poach 30 dozen eggs for today's brunch service".

o_0
 
2017-04-14 06:02:14 PM  

ginandbacon: hubiestubert: Poaching eggs is about timing, and that just takes a little practice.

Did I ever tell you about the nightmare I had where I'm sitting having a bloody and a waitress friend of mine comes over and asks me to help out her chef because the sous had cut himself and ended up in the ER? I walk back into the kitchen, meet the chef, who says to me, "Okay, so I need you to poach 30 dozen eggs for today's brunch service".

o_0


Having done brunch, a lot, yeah, I KNOW those feels.

When I got to Phoenix, Chef Jay asked me if there was ONE job that I NEVER wanted to do again, and I said, "Breakfast buffet because I've done it waaaaay too often."

Guess who got EVERY damn breakfast buffet we contracted for? Because I had the most experience...

/Should have said, "Saucier" or "poissonier"...
//Gottverdammt omelet stations...
 
2017-04-14 06:15:52 PM  

hubiestubert: ginandbacon: hubiestubert: Poaching eggs is about timing, and that just takes a little practice.

Did I ever tell you about the nightmare I had where I'm sitting having a bloody and a waitress friend of mine comes over and asks me to help out her chef because the sous had cut himself and ended up in the ER? I walk back into the kitchen, meet the chef, who says to me, "Okay, so I need you to poach 30 dozen eggs for today's brunch service".

o_0

Having done brunch, a lot, yeah, I KNOW those feels.

When I got to Phoenix, Chef Jay asked me if there was ONE job that I NEVER wanted to do again, and I said, "Breakfast buffet because I've done it waaaaay too often."

Guess who got EVERY damn breakfast buffet we contracted for? Because I had the most experience...

/Should have said, "Saucier" or "poissonier"...
//Gottverdammt omelet stations...


Pantry chef!
 
2017-04-14 06:21:08 PM  
I eat pesto several days a week in the summer. I just bring the food processor container outside and pick the basil straight into it. I guess I feel like not every meal needs to be an enormous elaborate masterpiece.
 
2017-04-14 06:23:50 PM  

ginandbacon: Pantry chef!


I like doing garde manger, because of the sheer variety and the compositions. And often because you get folded into doing desserts on top of the apps and salads and other chilled items. And desserts are just fun.

Of course, there's also the fact that you often get roped into doing the damn oysters and other raw bar goodies as well, which is always a pain on stations, because of space...
 
2017-04-14 06:34:09 PM  
As far as I'm concerned, the secret to being a working schmuck who can still get dinner on the table very quickly after work is to own one or more crock pots and pressure cookers.

Crock pots work, if you're the plan ahead type, especially now that they turn themselves down to warm when the cooking cycle you set is done. However, you do have to be organized enough to start it going before you're out the door to work.

Pressure cookers let you decide what you're going to make after you get home and still have the cooking time be very short. You can literally get dried beans on the table in under half an hour.

Plus, never underestimate the power of making large batches of versatile sides on the weekend and keeping them in the fridge for the week. Everybody in my household goes nuts for cole slaw, for example, and it's one of those things that get better as it sits in the fridge anyway. Likewise potato salad, macaroni salad, macaroni and cheese, etc go with most anything I'm likely to make on a work night.

Steam some fresh veggies, grab one of the premade sides out of the fridge, add a protein out of the crockpot or pressure cooker and BAM
 
2017-04-14 06:35:40 PM  

hubiestubert: ginandbacon: Pantry chef!

I like doing garde manger, because of the sheer variety and the compositions. And often because you get folded into doing desserts on top of the apps and salads and other chilled items. And desserts are just fun.

Of course, there's also the fact that you often get roped into doing the damn oysters and other raw bar goodies as well, which is always a pain on stations, because of space...


Yes and yes. And yes. Plus, you don't sit there wanting to murder the front because your shiat's getting cold...
 
2017-04-14 06:56:59 PM  

Trocadero: Pan fried steaks and sauces are quick, but I always like to salt the steaks for almost an hour beforehand, anyway. I tried 10/20 minutes, and the crust/juiciness just weren't what you got when you did it for an hour. It's almost like brining.


Try putting it in th fridge after salting, uncovered. The air circulation helps evaporate moisture that beads up due to the salting. Also pat dry before salting
 
2017-04-14 07:37:14 PM  

chitownmike: Trocadero: Pan fried steaks and sauces are quick, but I always like to salt the steaks for almost an hour beforehand, anyway. I tried 10/20 minutes, and the crust/juiciness just weren't what you got when you did it for an hour. It's almost like brining.

Try putting it in th fridge after salting, uncovered. The air circulation helps evaporate moisture that beads up due to the salting. Also pat dry before salting


Yeah this. I too liked my meat the better the longer I salted it, so eventually took to defrosting it while cooking breakfast, then salting it and leaving it in the fridge all day on an open dish while at work. Makes a WORLD of difference to the flavor. I know the chemistry starts in as little as 15 minutes, but all day is a HUGE difference.
 
2017-04-14 08:10:05 PM  
Freaking onions! They do not take 4-5 minutes to turn translucent; more like 20.
 
2017-04-14 08:10:58 PM  

Nogale: hubiestubert: ginandbacon: I really don't know how to do a quick meal unless it's like a salad and grilled cheese or pasta or something easy so I am going to be stalking this thread.

Rice takes 20 minutes. How much can yo chop, sear, or blanch or steam in that time frame? Same with mashed taters. I know you can sear a steak in that time, and for damn sure can blanch vegetables in that time frame. A quick pan sauce from the steak or pork or even chicken while the carbs are doing their thing, and it's easy peasy time.

Paella? Doesn't take that long. Carbonara certainly doesn't take very long. Heck, a great many Italian dishes are quick and easy. Caprese takes literally a few minutes, and that's a single course. Bread and olive oil, and a quick and easy tapanade and you've extended the time to get food on the table--or even just a simple olive and pepper salad.

Damn near any stir fry takes less time to cook than cutting everything, and you get the pan warmed up as you get the last of the protein cut.

Polenta takes about 20 minutes, and you can do it ahead of time so that it's just a matter of cut and sear/fry or whatever. You can whip up corn muffins/cornbread in about about half an hour, with maybe 5-10 minutes of mixing and throwing together, and 20 minutes of cook time. While they're baking, it's not hard to pan fry some fish, kill a mess of greens with some bacon and apple cider vinegar, and even do a quick lemon-butter.

Some frozen fruit, some honey, a touch of rum, and you've got a quick and dirty sorbet in the time it takes to run it through a food processor. Heck, you can make that right before dinner, and set it into a plastic bowl and dessert if done, on top of bread, starch, veggies, and protein. All in half an hour. If you use your time wisely.

The only thing that can take longer than 20 minutes is the quick wash of your pans after you plate--I like to wash as I go, so that there's NOT a bunch of stuff to clean up after dinner.

Hubie, you're a professional. Most people are not. We are slower and less sure of ourselves and have a smaller number of dishes memorized.

What you wrote above is the equivalent of me (a professional translator by trade) saying, "What's the problem with translating 1,000 words in an hour?" And yet some of the people I work with are much less experienced and struggle to do half that amount in an hour.


So watch Robert Rodriguez's ten minute cooking school on YouTube
 
2017-04-14 08:49:53 PM  

natazha: Freaking onions! They do not take 4-5 minutes to turn translucent; more like 20.


Your, electric stove, sucks
 
2017-04-14 09:49:46 PM  
Ive been doing narathon bookkeeping and tax work, so i cooked up a batch of nice spicy taco meat with tomatoes. Ill warm up a tortilla, put in some of the meat, a couple spoons of mixed veggies, black beans, cheese, salsa and sriracha. Wrap it all up cold in the warm tortilla, nuke it for 3 minutes and voila! About ten minutes start to eat. Quick, easy, nutritious, and imma go make one right now...
 
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