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(Open Culture)   Acclaimed novelist Haruki Murakami has some tracks he'd like to share with you on Spotify. 3,350 of them, to be exact, culled from his jazz-heavy collection of 10,000 albums   ( openculture.com) divider line
    More: Cool, novelist Haruki Murakami, Jazz, Haruki Murakami, Murakami's jazz, Murakami's body, Benny Goodman, hippest modern novels, Opera  
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571 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 14 Apr 2017 at 8:52 AM (31 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



12 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2017-04-14 08:21:12 AM  
I loved that song he did for the Lion King soundtrack.
 
2017-04-14 08:58:11 AM  
I love Murakami. No other writer makes me feel like that after reading a book.

/The feeling being usually "dafuq did I just read?"
 
2017-04-14 09:03:16 AM  
Murakami became a convert to jazz fandom at the age of 15 and until age 30 ran a jazz club.

Nice
https://tune.pk/video/2473170/the-very-best-of-jazz-club
 
2017-04-14 09:26:25 AM  
It's like he's pretentious without coming off as cocky or ostentatious.
 
2017-04-14 09:36:11 AM  
I'm proud to announce that I have nothing in common with that person judging by his playlist.
//stillunique
 
2017-04-14 09:50:51 AM  
 
2017-04-14 10:01:28 AM  
fta: a Bobby Hackett loaded playlist.

After Louis Armstrong blew out his lip -- fairly early in his career -- and couldn't play most of his sets, he hired Hackett to back him up. There are worse things for a musician than to be Louis Armstrong's back-up.

Most elevator music is purposefully recorded for that job, but the models for that kind of music were the recordings Hackett made as a for-hire trumpet player for Jackie Gleason Orchestra recordings. IIRC, they were, until fairly recently (20 years or so), the most successful "jazz" albums of all time. Hackett made nothing off of them except his hourly fee in the recording studio. The Hackett/Gleason recordings aren't bad. Jazz with strings. Muted horns. Etc. But Hackett's solos are the real thing.

Anyway, there are Hackett small combo records that are just fantastic and a 1947 recording with Armstrong and Jack Teagarden that is legend. It even has Big Sid Catlett on drums. If you're a pure modernist, your ears might bleed from how archaic the music is, but, hell, 99.999% of you flee when the word "jazz" is utttered anyway.
 
2017-04-14 10:13:38 AM  

yakmans_dad: After Louis Armstrong blew out his lip


He torched his lips using those little squeak tones early on to make it sound like her range is greater than it is.
 
2017-04-14 10:52:38 AM  
Considering that the guy wrote an entire essay consisting of nothing but free association and other mental wanderings while listening to 'The Girl From Ipanema', this doesn't surprise me in the slightest.
 
2017-04-14 12:54:32 PM  
 
2017-04-14 02:00:06 PM  
He is as fluent in classical as he as in jazz and sixties folk and pop, and his range in each genre is considerable.

Indeed.

img.fark.netView Full Size


/One of the greatest living/producing novelists.
//Wind Up Bird Chronicle is a masterpiece.
 
2017-04-14 02:10:02 PM  

mod_reright: He is as fluent in classical as he as in jazz and sixties folk and pop, and his range in each genre is considerable.

Indeed.

[img.fark.net image 308x475]

/One of the greatest living/producing novelists.
//Wind Up Bird Chronicle is a masterpiece.


This - I also love his focus on food. His novels feel very real to me dammit because the characters are always eating or drinking something, just like humans tend to do. Much love for Murakami.
 
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