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(NBC News)   Bank error in your favor, can you keep the money? Short answer: no. Long answer: 10 years in prison no   ( nbcnews.com) divider line
    More: PSA, bank, visibly tired teller, Cheque, deposit slip, American Bankers Association, senior vice president, local news reports, old fashioned check  
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1602 clicks; posted to Business » on 20 Mar 2017 at 8:30 PM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



35 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-03-20 05:35:44 PM  
Allow me to present a scenario, and get the Fark Lawyer BrigadeTMlet me know of the legal ramifications, if any:

Suppose your bank accidentally deposits a large sum (think $100,000 or so) into your interest-bearing account...say an IRA or CD or something.  Now you notice the deposit but you don't spend or withdraw any of it...you just let it sit there accruing interest until such time as your bank notifies you of the error, at which point they take the money back out of your account.  Unless you tell them that you noticed the discrepancy, there really is no evidence that you were aware (some people don't look too closely at their account statements).  My questions are 1) Are you in any legal trouble?, and 2) Do you get to keep the interest that accrued in your account, and if not who gets that money?
 
2017-03-20 07:27:39 PM  
If you put the money in a CD for safekeeping, but they come after you for the money, will they wave penalties for early withdrawal?
 
2017-03-20 07:34:20 PM  
Fun fact about me: in college, $7,5000 appeared in my account. I had no idea what to do.  I asked my roommate and my RA. They said "take it all out before they catch the mistake!" so I did.  See, my birth name is the same as my (now deceased) mother's name.  And she was a co-signatory on my grandmother's account.  They put it in the wrong account, somehow.

My mom almost murdered me when she found out I took it, and had a deposit on an apartment, a new guitar, zines and stickers, a skateboard, my first nose ring, and the rest of the cash in a sock in my drawer.  This was in 1993, $7,500 was huge.

My mom threatened to slap the nose ring into my ear, "where it belonged" and made me pay back everything that wasn't in the sock.  Ironically, by working at The Sock Man in NYC. (A sock store, nothing creepy.)  Not my finest moment, but 10 years on, my mom and I were able to laugh about the stupidity on my part and the ridiculously bad advice.
 
2017-03-20 08:48:10 PM  
You make one mistake and they'll snow you with fees.

Sounds fair.
 
2017-03-20 08:51:57 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: Do you get to keep the interest that accrued in your account, and if not who gets that money?


IANAL but logic would dictate that

1. The interest belongs to the rightful owner of said money.

2. If there was no actual money being transferred (someone/something added a bunch of zeroes to a transaction), then there is no interest as there was no real money for interest to be earned on.
 
2017-03-20 09:07:47 PM  
interestingly enough, I have a situation I've been wondering about


on a certain large web-retailer site, there is a glitch in their shopping cart that is trying to multiply the value of the gift card I have.    I have emailed, called, and support-chatted the issue to them  for a total of 8 hours or so of my time.  The issue is not resolved.  It would take me over 8 hours to drive to the nearest physical store that sells the item.   If they don't fix the issue, I'm not going to make the transaction, but if I don't use the gift card within the next month or so, it starts losing value or expires .

What  rights do I have or what can I do?  I'm not interested in defrauding them, but I want the damn item or the value of my gift card in full.
 
2017-03-20 09:14:38 PM  
There are two separate questions that are being confused in the article. The first question is can you keep the money and spend it? The second is what are the legal ramifications for doing so? The answer to the first question is "of course" and the answer to the second question is "it depends". The legal ramifications break down into two categories: civil and criminal. Generally speaking, if you keep the money and spend it you will be civilly liable for paying the money back. The common law injury is "unjust enrichment".  What a civil judgment means depends: if you are 20 it probably means a lot if you are 80 and die the day after the civil judgment it probably means nothing.

Criminal liability, on the other hand, will turn on the state of mind (men rea) you had when you spent it. Criminal cases in this area are difficult to prove because the government not only has to prove that you took the money and spent it but that you intended to defraud the bank when you did so. The government can rely on circumstantial evidence to prove your intent but juries don't always buy it.

Sin_City_Superhero: 2) Do you get to keep the interest that accrued in your account, and if not who gets that money?


Depends. If you are found guilty of a crime the money will be returned to the bank because it is proceeds from a crime. If it is a civil judgment only against you you will probably be able to keep the money but it will be circumstance specific.
 
2017-03-20 09:14:44 PM  
Meanwhile Wells Fargo steals hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of dollars from customers with their fake account scam.  Anyone go to jail for that yet?
 
2017-03-20 09:18:00 PM  

TaskForce26: Meanwhile Wells Fargo steals hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of dollars from customers with their fake account scam.  Anyone go to jail for that yet?


thats an instance where corporations are NOT people, my friend.
 
2017-03-20 09:19:13 PM  
Had my mother's name as a co-signer on a checking account (so while I was away at college she could deposit a bit of cash - because if dad's name was on it his answer to 'could you send a few bucks' would be LOL, no),

Fast forward 10 years and the result of mom moving $10,000+ accrued interest from a maturing CD to their checking was me getting it deposited in my account because they didn't look up who was primary on which checking account, or ask apparently.

Me to the bank: WTF, where did this transfer come from?

Bank calls mom back and says 'your husband' didn't authorize this transfer?  Is that correct?

Of course its authorized, but please move it to the right farking account.

Took about a month for them to sort out the transfer...

/csb boring banking story bro
// Relationship codes, they mean something
///slashie deposit error your favor
 
2017-03-20 09:36:38 PM  

worlddan: There are two separate questions that are being confused in the article. The first question is can you keep the money and spend it? The second is what are the legal ramifications for doing so? The answer to the first question is "of course" and the answer to the second question is "it depends". The legal ramifications break down into two categories: civil and criminal. Generally speaking, if you keep the money and spend it you will be civilly liable for paying the money back. The common law injury is "unjust enrichment".  What a civil judgment means depends: if you are 20 it probably means a lot if you are 80 and die the day after the civil judgment it probably means nothing.

Criminal liability, on the other hand, will turn on the state of mind (men rea) you had when you spent it. Criminal cases in this area are difficult to prove because the government not only has to prove that you took the money and spent it but that you intended to defraud the bank when you did so. The government can rely on circumstantial evidence to prove your intent but juries don't always buy it.

Sin_City_Superhero: 2) Do you get to keep the interest that accrued in your account, and if not who gets that money?

Depends. If you are found guilty of a crime the money will be returned to the bank because it is proceeds from a crime. If it is a civil judgment only against you you will probably be able to keep the money but it will be circumstance specific.


I asked a lawyer friend of mine who works for a bank about this a while ago. He said if it is an error by the bank, not caused by any shenanigans on your part, the bank has a certain amount of time to correct their error or they are out of luck. Also, it is not your job to inform them of their error, but you had better not move or spend a single dime of that money. So, you don't have to inform them of their error, but if they discover the error in the time frame that they legally have, you had better still have all of that money in that account or you will more than likely be charged with a crime.
 
2017-03-20 09:39:18 PM  

Leader O'Cola: interestingly enough, I have a situation I've been wondering about


on a certain large web-retailer site, there is a glitch in their shopping cart that is trying to multiply the value of the gift card I have.    I have emailed, called, and support-chatted the issue to them  for a total of 8 hours or so of my time.  The issue is not resolved.  It would take me over 8 hours to drive to the nearest physical store that sells the item.   If they don't fix the issue, I'm not going to make the transaction, but if I don't use the gift card within the next month or so, it starts losing value or expires .

What  rights do I have or what can I do?  I'm not interested in defrauding them, but I want the damn item or the value of my gift card in full.


Have you tried contacting an executive or their assistant? I had an ongoing issue with a telecom provider recently and ended up calling their VP of Western States Operations after wasting too much time on a billing system bug nobody wanted to deal with.

I left a message with his assistant and he called me back within an hour to better understand the bug and apologize. He also thanked me for reaching out instead of telling the world on Facebook or Twitter.
 
2017-03-20 09:44:20 PM  

Leader O'Cola: interestingly enough, I have a situation I've been wondering about


on a certain large web-retailer site, there is a glitch in their shopping cart that is trying to multiply the value of the gift card I have.    I have emailed, called, and support-chatted the issue to them  for a total of 8 hours or so of my time.  The issue is not resolved.  It would take me over 8 hours to drive to the nearest physical store that sells the item.   If they don't fix the issue, I'm not going to make the transaction, but if I don't use the gift card within the next month or so, it starts losing value or expires .

What  rights do I have or what can I do?  I'm not interested in defrauding them, but I want the damn item or the value of my gift card in full.


I'm surprised at the card changing value on you.  most states have laws saying a pre-paid gift card is equivalent to cash and the company can't alter the balance through fees or other non-usage charges and that they don't expire.

Depending on the value, I'd go ahead and use the card to full recognized value and if they complain or try to charge you more, point out the multiple times and hours you have personally put into the problem to fix it.  I'd also keep records if you have them.  If not, maybe even try once more just to get a record.  If we're talking over $500 real value, I'd limit my purchase total to close to the actual value and extra be damned but that's just my personal limit.
 
2017-03-20 09:46:57 PM  

ongbok: worlddan: There are two separate questions that are being confused in the article. The first question is can you keep the money and spend it? The second is what are the legal ramifications for doing so? The answer to the first question is "of course" and the answer to the second question is "it depends". The legal ramifications break down into two categories: civil and criminal. Generally speaking, if you keep the money and spend it you will be civilly liable for paying the money back. The common law injury is "unjust enrichment".  What a civil judgment means depends: if you are 20 it probably means a lot if you are 80 and die the day after the civil judgment it probably means nothing.

Criminal liability, on the other hand, will turn on the state of mind (men rea) you had when you spent it. Criminal cases in this area are difficult to prove because the government not only has to prove that you took the money and spent it but that you intended to defraud the bank when you did so. The government can rely on circumstantial evidence to prove your intent but juries don't always buy it.

Sin_City_Superhero: 2) Do you get to keep the interest that accrued in your account, and if not who gets that money?

Depends. If you are found guilty of a crime the money will be returned to the bank because it is proceeds from a crime. If it is a civil judgment only against you you will probably be able to keep the money but it will be circumstance specific.

I asked a lawyer friend of mine who works for a bank about this a while ago. He said if it is an error by the bank, not caused by any shenanigans on your part, the bank has a certain amount of time to correct their error or they are out of luck. Also, it is not your job to inform them of their error, but you had better not move or spend a single dime of that money. So, you don't have to inform them of their error, but if they discover the error in the time frame that they legally have, you had better still have all of that money i ...


But what's the time frame?  With the fake checks & cashier check scams, it can be 6 months before they catch that it wasn't legit and legally dock your account.  I would think the time frame would be pretty damn long in the grand scheme of things.
 
2017-03-20 09:55:54 PM  
Never had this happen to me .    Honestly I have always wished the laws was that if the bank did not catch an error in 1 week they had to eat it and pay out to cover.    I want this not because the people wrongfully getting money due to a bank error should get a windfall but that the bank  should have to make there own mistakes right and if they could no longer  take back a mistaken deposit if not caught in time it just might get them to be more careful.

One week should be plenty of time to catch an error so long as you have procedures in place to make sure money transfers and deposits are going where are supposed to be.
 
2017-03-20 10:05:17 PM  

grimlock1972: Never had this happen to me .    Honestly I have always wished the laws was that if the bank did not catch an error in 1 week they had to eat it and pay out to cover.    I want this not because the people wrongfully getting money due to a bank error should get a windfall but that the bank  should have to make there own mistakes right and if they could no longer  take back a mistaken deposit if not caught in time it just might get them to be more careful.

One week should be plenty of time to catch an error so long as you have procedures in place to make sure money transfers and deposits are going where are supposed to be.


I think one week is a little short... I'd give it 1 month.  That said, almost ever individual check deposit over $2000 (give or take, depending on the bank) gets held for an extra day to verify it's legit.  You'd think the verifiers would check to be sure it went into the correct account at that time.
 
2017-03-20 10:05:38 PM  
That's okay.   I've still got 10 bucks from coming in second in that beauty contest.
 
2017-03-20 10:17:15 PM  

zeroflight222: Leader O'Cola: interestingly enough, I have a situation I've been wondering about


on a certain large web-retailer site, there is a glitch in their shopping cart that is trying to multiply the value of the gift card I have.    I have emailed, called, and support-chatted the issue to them  for a total of 8 hours or so of my time.  The issue is not resolved.  It would take me over 8 hours to drive to the nearest physical store that sells the item.   If they don't fix the issue, I'm not going to make the transaction, but if I don't use the gift card within the next month or so, it starts losing value or expires .

What  rights do I have or what can I do?  I'm not interested in defrauding them, but I want the damn item or the value of my gift card in full.

I'm surprised at the card changing value on you.  most states have laws saying a pre-paid gift card is equivalent to cash and the company can't alter the balance through fees or other non-usage charges and that they don't expire.

Depending on the value, I'd go ahead and use the card to full recognized value and if they complain or try to charge you more, point out the multiple times and hours you have personally put into the problem to fix it.  I'd also keep records if you have them.  If not, maybe even try once more just to get a record.  If we're talking over $500 real value, I'd limit my purchase total to close to the actual value and extra be damned but that's just my personal limit.


It's not the card value itself.

Let's say I have 3 items in my cart, and the card is worth $100 (nominally).
If my cart is 245.99, it gives me  3x100 = -300      0.00 total

if I add another 1.99 item to my cart,  it goes to  247.98 - $400 =  0.00 total

In theory I could get millions of $ of stuff for free if I were a scumbag, I suppose.
 
2017-03-20 10:18:41 PM  

zeroflight222: grimlock1972: Never had this happen to me .    Honestly I have always wished the laws was that if the bank did not catch an error in 1 week they had to eat it and pay out to cover.    I want this not because the people wrongfully getting money due to a bank error should get a windfall but that the bank  should have to make there own mistakes right and if they could no longer  take back a mistaken deposit if not caught in time it just might get them to be more careful.

One week should be plenty of time to catch an error so long as you have procedures in place to make sure money transfers and deposits are going where are supposed to be.

I think one week is a little short... I'd give it 1 month.  That said, almost ever individual check deposit over $2000 (give or take, depending on the bank) gets held for an extra day to verify it's legit.  You'd think the verifiers would check to be sure it went into the correct account at that time.


A  month would acceptable for amounts over $1,000  under that a week should be enough,    One would think but obviously they mess up now and then.
 
2017-03-20 10:33:12 PM  

Leader O'Cola: zeroflight222: Leader O'Cola: interestingly enough, I have a situation I've been wondering about


on a certain large web-retailer site, there is a glitch in their shopping cart that is trying to multiply the value of the gift card I have.    I have emailed, called, and support-chatted the issue to them  for a total of 8 hours or so of my time.  The issue is not resolved.  It would take me over 8 hours to drive to the nearest physical store that sells the item.   If they don't fix the issue, I'm not going to make the transaction, but if I don't use the gift card within the next month or so, it starts losing value or expires .

What  rights do I have or what can I do?  I'm not interested in defrauding them, but I want the damn item or the value of my gift card in full.

I'm surprised at the card changing value on you.  most states have laws saying a pre-paid gift card is equivalent to cash and the company can't alter the balance through fees or other non-usage charges and that they don't expire.

Depending on the value, I'd go ahead and use the card to full recognized value and if they complain or try to charge you more, point out the multiple times and hours you have personally put into the problem to fix it.  I'd also keep records if you have them.  If not, maybe even try once more just to get a record.  If we're talking over $500 real value, I'd limit my purchase total to close to the actual value and extra be damned but that's just my personal limit.

It's not the card value itself.

Let's say I have 3 items in my cart, and the card is worth $100 (nominally).
If my cart is 245.99, it gives me  3x100 = -300      0.00 total

if I add another 1.99 item to my cart,  it goes to  247.98 - $400 =  0.00 total

In theory I could get millions of $ of stuff for free if I were a scumbag, I suppose.


Which retailer is this? I need to know because it's, umm, relevant to wit of legal.... bird law... yeah. So what retailer is this?
 
2017-03-20 10:41:02 PM  
Depends on the error.

img.fark.net
 
2017-03-20 11:11:53 PM  

ongbok: He said if it is an error by the bank, not caused by any shenanigans on your part, the bank has a certain amount of time to correct their error or they are out of luck


If your life is one the line I wouldn't hire this legal friend if I were you.

ongbok: you had better still have all of that money in that account or you will more than likely be charged with a crime.


A prosecutor can indict a ham sandwich, as the saying goes.
 
2017-03-21 12:09:36 AM  

TaskForce26: Meanwhile Wells Fargo steals hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of dollars from customers with their fake account scam.  Anyone go to jail for that yet?


Which didn't happen.  The issue is that Wells Fargo's incentive structure rewarded the opening of new accounts.  So customers saw new accounts opened and -maybe- a new fee or two.  The real issue is Wells Fargo managers lied about it. So in most cases it was an inconvience to customers and a huge ethical problem for the bank.

Which - btw - the CEO paid for with his job.
 
2017-03-21 01:51:03 AM  

gingerjet: TaskForce26: Meanwhile Wells Fargo steals hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of dollars from customers with their fake account scam.  Anyone go to jail for that yet?

Which didn't happen.  The issue is that Wells Fargo's incentive structure rewarded the opening of new accounts.  So customers saw new accounts opened and -maybe- a new fee or two.  The real issue is Wells Fargo managers lied about it. So in most cases it was an inconvience to customers and a huge ethical problem for the bank.

Which - btw - the CEO paid for with his job.


As I recall there were also some issues with Wells Fargo setting up loans in people's names that could mess with credit ratings or people's access to future loans until they got everything cleared up.
 
2017-03-21 04:09:03 AM  

Leader O'Cola: zeroflight222: Leader O'Cola: interestingly enough, I have a situation I've been wondering about


on a certain large web-retailer site, there is a glitch in their shopping cart that is trying to multiply the value of the gift card I have.    I have emailed, called, and support-chatted the issue to them  for a total of 8 hours or so of my time.  The issue is not resolved.  It would take me over 8 hours to drive to the nearest physical store that sells the item.   If they don't fix the issue, I'm not going to make the transaction, but if I don't use the gift card within the next month or so, it starts losing value or expires .

What  rights do I have or what can I do?  I'm not interested in defrauding them, but I want the damn item or the value of my gift card in full.

I'm surprised at the card changing value on you.  most states have laws saying a pre-paid gift card is equivalent to cash and the company can't alter the balance through fees or other non-usage charges and that they don't expire.

Depending on the value, I'd go ahead and use the card to full recognized value and if they complain or try to charge you more, point out the multiple times and hours you have personally put into the problem to fix it.  I'd also keep records if you have them.  If not, maybe even try once more just to get a record.  If we're talking over $500 real value, I'd limit my purchase total to close to the actual value and extra be damned but that's just my personal limit.

It's not the card value itself.

Let's say I have 3 items in my cart, and the card is worth $100 (nominally).
If my cart is 245.99, it gives me  3x100 = -300      0.00 total

if I add another 1.99 item to my cart,  it goes to  247.98 - $400 =  0.00 total

In theory I could get millions of $ of stuff for free if I were a scumbag, I suppose.


I would order $1m worth of products, then get the local news to show up when FedEx started delivering.  Document everything to make it a bug report instead of exploiting the system.

Or just try reaching an executive.  I bet a Director of eCommerce at the site you're talking about would love to be the one to report a bug like this.  LinkedIn can be quite useful.
 
2017-03-21 07:53:01 AM  
One Georgia teen learned this the hard way. After spending $30,000 in his bank account that didn't belong to him, the young man earned a 10-year sentence,

Which is 10 years more than any banker from any bank. Like Deutsche Bank with it's 1700 open court cases and a lot of closed cases where they admitted wrongdoing.
 
2017-03-21 08:16:44 AM  
Because if the bank accidentally forecloses on your house they make it right immediately or face jail time right?

Why are you laughing?
 
2017-03-21 08:55:22 AM  

Leader O'Cola: interestingly enough, I have a situation I've been wondering about


on a certain large web-retailer site, there is a glitch in their shopping cart that is trying to multiply the value of the gift card I have.    I have emailed, called, and support-chatted the issue to them  for a total of 8 hours or so of my time.  The issue is not resolved.  It would take me over 8 hours to drive to the nearest physical store that sells the item.   If they don't fix the issue, I'm not going to make the transaction, but if I don't use the gift card within the next month or so, it starts losing value or expires .

What  rights do I have or what can I do?  I'm not interested in defrauding them, but I want the damn item or the value of my gift card in full.


Contact their sales, say you have a critical security vulnerability, and need to speak to a security contact, and give them your contact information.  If it is a small company, you'll usually get contacted back within a day by the owner or CTO.  I've found the sales guys are usually more helpful than the support guys.
 
kab
2017-03-21 08:57:36 AM  
Weird, banks get to keep your money with no jail time when sorting withdrawals / deposits to trigger an overdraft fee.

You make a mistake, you pay.  Bank makes a mistake, you go to jail.
 
2017-03-21 09:14:22 AM  

gingerjet: Which didn't happen.  The issue is that Wells Fargo's incentive structure rewarded the opening of new accounts.  So customers saw new accounts opened and -maybe- a new fee or two.  The real issue is Wells Fargo managers lied about it. So in most cases it was an inconvience to customers and a huge ethical problem for the bank.

Which - btw - the CEO paid for with his job.


The people who participated, as well as the managers who knew and covered it up, should have gone to jail.
 
2017-03-21 09:29:50 AM  
FTFH:  Long answer: 10 years in prison no

FTFA:  One Georgia teen learned this the hard way. After spending $30,000 in his bank account that didn't belong to him, the young man earned a 10-year sentence, according to local news reports

FAFS:  A Madison County, Georgia teen who spent the better part of $30,000, which was mistakenly put into his checking account by a bank teller, will serve the next 10 years on probation and has been ordered by a judge to pay the money back.

Read more: http://www.cbs46.com/story/28299983/teen-convicted-after-spendi​ng-31k-​mistakenly-deposited-into-his-account#ixzz4bxzgnnr3

10 years in prison seemed both excessive and incredible, but I can see how subby's link would make one think that.
 
2017-03-21 11:27:58 AM  

Sin_City_Superhero: Allow me to present a scenario, and get the Fark Lawyer BrigadeTMlet me know of the legal ramifications, if any:

Suppose your bank accidentally deposits a large sum (think $100,000 or so) into your interest-bearing account...say an IRA or CD or something.  Now you notice the deposit but you don't spend or withdraw any of it...you just let it sit there accruing interest until such time as your bank notifies you of the error, at which point they take the money back out of your account.  Unless you tell them that you noticed the discrepancy, there really is no evidence that you were aware (some people don't look too closely at their account statements).  My questions are 1) Are you in any legal trouble?, and 2) Do you get to keep the interest that accrued in your account, and if not who gets that money?


1.  NO.

2.  It depends on how the money got there.  999 times out of 1,000 the bank won't have an easy claim to the interest because it was their fault the money ended up in your account (theoretically a party cannot have unclean hands if it wants to claim the equitable relief of unjust enrichment)...not impossible..just probably too messy to deal with relative to the amount of interest involved.  Of course, there's probably something in the agreement you signed when you opened the account which would allow them to rescind the interest in a situation where the money never existed (they added an extra 0 or two to a deposit without a corresponding withdrawal somewhere else).
 
2017-03-21 11:56:04 AM  

Cataholic: 2.  It depends on how the money got there.  999 times out of 1,000 the bank won't have an easy claim to the interest because it was their fault the money ended up in your account (theoretically a party cannot have unclean hands if it wants to claim the equitable relief of unjust enrichment)...not impossible..just probably too messy to deal with relative to the amount of interest involved.  Of course, there's probably something in the agreement you signed when you opened the account which would allow them to rescind the interest in a situation where the money never existed (they added an extra 0 or two to a deposit without a corresponding withdrawal somewhere else).


The bank is going to pull the deposit from your account and the interest. And while you can claim that interest should have been yours, no prosecutor will support criminal charges, and I doubt you could find a lawyer to take the case civilly. So, practically, no.
 
2017-03-21 12:35:49 PM  
What's going on in here?
img.fark.net
 
2017-03-21 07:13:29 PM  

Theaetetus: Cataholic: 2.  It depends on how the money got there.  999 times out of 1,000 the bank won't have an easy claim to the interest because it was their fault the money ended up in your account (theoretically a party cannot have unclean hands if it wants to claim the equitable relief of unjust enrichment)...not impossible..just probably too messy to deal with relative to the amount of interest involved.  Of course, there's probably something in the agreement you signed when you opened the account which would allow them to rescind the interest in a situation where the money never existed (they added an extra 0 or two to a deposit without a corresponding withdrawal somewhere else).

The bank is going to pull the deposit from your account and the interest. And while you can claim that interest should have been yours, no prosecutor will support criminal charges, and I doubt you could find a lawyer to take the case civilly. So, practically, no.


As I said..it depends on where the money came from and how it got there.  They'll reverse the original transaction and replace it with a corrected one.  Whether they take the time to recalculate the interest and reverse all of those other transactions depends on how much you're talking about and whether or not anyone else is entitled to that interest (or if the interest should have ever existed).  And rest assured, most banks are more concerned with FDIC auditors than they are with depositor's attorneys.  Granted, I've only ever represented small banks with fewer than 20 branches, but your mileage may very with multi-state institutions.
 
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Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.

In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

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