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(Newsweek)   Yakuza disappearing from across Japan. It's all been downhill for them since that guest shot on "The Simpsons"   ( newsweek.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Yakuza, yakuza members, yakuza gang members, Organized crime, National Police Agency, Gang, Crime, notorious Japanese gang  
•       •       •

10570 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Mar 2017 at 9:20 AM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-03-20 09:04:57 AM  
However, games based on the Yakuza seem to be on the rise.

img.fark.net
 
2017-03-20 09:06:06 AM  
Being part of a crime syndicate probably isn't as sexy as it used to be. Millennials don't want to spend time running hookers and drugs and cutting off fingers and shiat.  They need to diversify, maybe go legit.  open a Yakuza theme part or something.
 
2017-03-20 09:06:37 AM  
Pam's probably beat the shiat out of half of them.
 
2017-03-20 09:09:46 AM  

Mentat: Pam's probably beat the shiat out of half of them.


Pam is awesome. LOL!  She's my favorite.
 
2017-03-20 09:10:32 AM  

Ambivalence: Being part of a crime syndicate probably isn't as sexy as it used to be. Millennials don't want to spend time running hookers and drugs and cutting off fingers and shiat.  They need to diversify, maybe go legit.  open a Yakuza theme part or something.


Apparantly drug use is down as well with the advent of cell phones:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/13/health/teenagers-drugs-smartphones​.​html?_r=0

I'm not sure if this is a good thing or a bad thing, honestly.  Obviously avoiding addictive and dangerous substances is a good thing.  However, if kids are taking less risks and getting easy entertainment with little effort, what will that do for people in general?
 
2017-03-20 09:22:33 AM  
Disappearing, or keeping a lower profile?

Japan manufacturers less than they used to. The traditional role of Yakuza as strike-breakers is less needed than it was in say, the 1960s.
 
2017-03-20 09:22:59 AM  
FORGIVANESS PLEASE!!!!!!
 
2017-03-20 09:23:03 AM  
THIS
IS NOT
 A YAKUZA
 T-SHIRT
 
2017-03-20 09:23:38 AM  

vonmatrices: Ambivalence: Being part of a crime syndicate probably isn't as sexy as it used to be. Millennials don't want to spend time running hookers and drugs and cutting off fingers and shiat.  They need to diversify, maybe go legit.  open a Yakuza theme part or something.

Apparantly drug use is down as well with the advent of cell phones:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/13/health/teenagers-drugs-smartphones.​html?_r=0

I'm not sure if this is a good thing or a bad thing, honestly.  Obviously avoiding addictive and dangerous substances is a good thing.  However, if kids are taking less risks and getting easy entertainment with little effort, what will that do for people in general?


img.fark.net

You are right to be concerned, guy.
 
2017-03-20 09:25:56 AM  
You don't think they're being outsourced to the Koreans, do you?
 
2017-03-20 09:26:16 AM  
The Yakuza have had some hard times. Or rather, a lot of different operations have been quietly transforming themselves to either go entirely legit, or in the case of the guys who used to strongarm the entertainment industry, it's just harder and harder to make a buck, especially without a huge Commie threat to make their activities kind of patriotic. Plus, recruitment has been kind of slow, to the point of taking in a LOT of Korean muscle, who can't advance in the ranks, which leads to folks either abandoning the Yakuza to make their own gangs, or just being sort of irritable at the pure blood Japanese leadership is getting older and older.

Then again, the Yakuza have been a part of the fabric of Japanese society for a long time. The Yakuza helped spark Japan's entrance to WWII by assassinating the Empress of Korea. They were in charge of getting folks hooked on opium in China. When the government betrayed them, they switched sides and helped the Allies, and then afterward helped quell labor unrest and keep things moving at the docks and around the country. They've been on the ropes before. They may still survive this, but their numbers ARE going to be heavily reduced, and that means that the bosozuko are going away forever, but the bukuto are just going underground for a while. Gurentai are probably going away, or at least limited to the point of being footnotes, but jiageya and jisageya are going to remain so long as there are crooked real estate deals to be made. Tekiya and sokaiya will remain, and some are even going semi-legit. And loan sharks will always sort of be in the background, so the seiriya will be relatively fine. The one thing that the Yakuza does do well is adapt to circumstances, and find NEW ways to scheme and profit. They'll contract, they'll eventually find ground that they can flourish under, and come back, albeit transformed a bit.
 
2017-03-20 09:27:46 AM  
Guess Fat Tony won that one....
 
2017-03-20 09:31:03 AM  

Ambivalence: Being part of a crime syndicate probably isn't as sexy as it used to be.


What I find really interesting is that the idea of the classy or sexy mobster is almost entirely a creation of the Godfather book and movies. It was a trope that showed up earlier but I've seen a couple interviews where former mobsters talked about how their fellows in crime started cleaning up and dressing better after those movies came out. Before the Godfather the mob was pretty shlubby.

But as for Japan, with the quickly aging population and so few younger people it's probably not that hard to find a half-decent job with good prospects for promotion.
 
2017-03-20 09:32:38 AM  

hubiestubert: Then again, the Yakuza have been a part of the fabric of Japanese society for a long time. The Yakuza helped spark Japan's entrance to WWII by assassinating the Empress of Korea. They were in charge of getting folks hooked on opium in China. When the government betrayed them, they switched sides and helped the Allies, and then afterward helped quell labor unrest and keep things moving at the docks and around the country.


The role of the Yakuza in Japan's face-based society is that they were "outsiders" who could perform politically-unpalatable, but necessary jobs with sufficient plausible deniability to save face for their patron.

Basically, they performed the same roles samurai used to, but at half the price.
 
2017-03-20 09:32:56 AM  
I never really seen them as a "ruthless gang".  Most people who ended up hurt or killed knoew what they were getting into before they farked up.  I remember listening to this story told by some MMA fighter. Paraphrasing here;  Back in like 1998 or something.  Him and his friend were hanging out at a bar in Japan and his friend got into a fight with a Yakuza and sucker punched him.  The guy and fellow Yakuzi later caught him outside as they were leaving, formed a circle and forced the friend and Yakuza to fight it out.   The friend won out and the gang left. You know, instead of gunning both of them down mercilessly and possibly wounding/killing others.'
 
2017-03-20 09:34:10 AM  
I blame Yakuza Apocalypse.
 
2017-03-20 09:34:34 AM  
They're missing the strong leadership they once had in O-Ren Ishii.
 
2017-03-20 09:35:56 AM  
Their numbers have been reduced by a series of Yakuza wars. However, guns are quite hard to come by in Japan, so the preferred weapons are traditional Japanese knives, swords, and tentacles.
 
2017-03-20 09:37:59 AM  
Thank Pope Francis for excommunicating them
 
2017-03-20 09:38:02 AM  

eKonk: They're missing the strong leadership they once had in O-Ren Ishii.


Yea. That mixed blood line really did cause problems, didn't it?
 
2017-03-20 09:39:40 AM  

This text is now purple: Disappearing, or keeping a lower profile?

Japan manufacturers less than they used to. The traditional role of Yakuza as strike-breakers is less needed than it was in say, the 1960s.


They are still there. Yakuza has a lot of members both high and low. They are probably just shifting to more white collar crime but be assured, they are still there and should not be crossed.
 
2017-03-20 09:41:50 AM  

Ambivalence: Mentat: Pam's probably beat the shiat out of half of them.

Pam is awesome. LOL!  She's my favorite.


"She" is living as a man now:
https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2016/07/archer-season-8-cast-a​n​d-creator-give-us-the-scoop.html
 
2017-03-20 09:42:41 AM  

To The Escape Zeppelin!: What I find really interesting is that the idea of the classy or sexy mobster is almost entirely a creation of the Godfather book and movies.


You mean besides Dillinger, Capone, Rothstein, Lansky, etc.

This is why gangsters began to be depicted as schlubby. It was censorship.
 
2017-03-20 09:43:51 AM  
img.fark.net
The real reason the yakuza is disappearing.

/in the dark
//welcome to his world
 
2017-03-20 09:44:15 AM  

vonmatrices: Apparantly drug use is down as well with the advent of cell phones:


Maybe they've just replaced one addiction with another.
 
2017-03-20 09:49:17 AM  
The prosthetics pinky industry makes such realistic fakes that everybody looks legit.
 
2017-03-20 09:50:23 AM  
They all moved to Korea to head Samsung
 
2017-03-20 09:52:21 AM  
img.fark.net
forgive-a-ness, please.
 
2017-03-20 09:55:17 AM  

hubiestubert: The Yakuza have had some hard times. Or rather, a lot of different operations have been quietly transforming themselves to either go entirely legit, or in the case of the guys who used to strongarm the entertainment industry, it's just harder and harder to make a buck, especially without a huge Commie threat to make their activities kind of patriotic. Plus, recruitment has been kind of slow, to the point of taking in a LOT of Korean muscle, who can't advance in the ranks, which leads to folks either abandoning the Yakuza to make their own gangs, or just being sort of irritable at the pure blood Japanese leadership is getting older and older.

Then again, the Yakuza have been a part of the fabric of Japanese society for a long time. The Yakuza helped spark Japan's entrance to WWII by assassinating the Empress of Korea. They were in charge of getting folks hooked on opium in China. When the government betrayed them, they switched sides and helped the Allies, and then afterward helped quell labor unrest and keep things moving at the docks and around the country. They've been on the ropes before. They may still survive this, but their numbers ARE going to be heavily reduced, and that means that the bosozuko are going away forever, but the bukuto are just going underground for a while. Gurentai are probably going away, or at least limited to the point of being footnotes, but jiageya and jisageya are going to remain so long as there are crooked real estate deals to be made. Tekiya and sokaiya will remain, and some are even going semi-legit. And loan sharks will always sort of be in the background, so the seiriya will be relatively fine. The one thing that the Yakuza does do well is adapt to circumstances, and find NEW ways to scheme and profit. They'll contract, they'll eventually find ground that they can flourish under, and come back, albeit transformed a bit.


Kind of like the GOP, but with class?
 
2017-03-20 09:57:56 AM  
But Marge, the little guy hasn't done anything yet.  See, he's just standing there.  And you know when he does it's gonna be good.
 
2017-03-20 09:58:45 AM  

hubiestubert: recruitment has been kind of slow, to the point of taking in a LOT of Korean muscle, who can't advance in the ranks,


???
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakuza#Ethnic_Koreans
In the early 1990s, 18 of 90 top bosses of Inagawa-kai were ethnic Koreans.
...
Notable yakuza members of Korean ancestry include Hisayuki Machii, the founder of the Tosei-kai, Tokutaro Takayama, the president of the 4th-generation Aizukotetsu-kai, Jiro Kiyota, the president of the 5th-generation Inagawa-kai, Hirofumi Hashimoto, the head of the Kyokushinrengo-kai, and the bosses of the 6th / 7th Sakaume-gumi.
 
2017-03-20 10:08:55 AM  
FTC:
"Now if we can do the same with HATEFUL FEMINISM the world would indeed be a much better place. People could live in harmony and peace."

Fess up.
 
2017-03-20 10:14:53 AM  
could be due to laws Japan adopted in 2011 that made it illegal for business owners to give money to gang members in exchange for protection

Uh. I'm pretty sure they don't do that voluntarily. Japan is weird though so who knows.
 
2017-03-20 10:20:17 AM  

hubiestubert: The Yakuza have had some hard times. Or rather, a lot of different operations have been quietly transforming themselves to either go entirely legit, or in the case of the guys who used to strongarm the entertainment industry, it's just harder and harder to make a buck, especially without a huge Commie threat to make their activities kind of patriotic. Plus, recruitment has been kind of slow, to the point of taking in a LOT of Korean muscle, who can't advance in the ranks, which leads to folks either abandoning the Yakuza to make their own gangs, or just being sort of irritable at the pure blood Japanese leadership is getting older and older.

Then again, the Yakuza have been a part of the fabric of Japanese society for a long time. The Yakuza helped spark Japan's entrance to WWII by assassinating the Empress of Korea. They were in charge of getting folks hooked on opium in China. When the government betrayed them, they switched sides and helped the Allies, and then afterward helped quell labor unrest and keep things moving at the docks and around the country. They've been on the ropes before. They may still survive this, but their numbers ARE going to be heavily reduced, and that means that the bosozuko are going away forever, but the bukuto are just going underground for a while. Gurentai are probably going away, or at least limited to the point of being footnotes, but jiageya and jisageya are going to remain so long as there are crooked real estate deals to be made. Tekiya and sokaiya will remain, and some are even going semi-legit. And loan sharks will always sort of be in the background, so the seiriya will be relatively fine. The one thing that the Yakuza does do well is adapt to circumstances, and find NEW ways to scheme and profit. They'll contract, they'll eventually find ground that they can flourish under, and come back, albeit transformed a bit.


Who will protect my balls?!
 
2017-03-20 10:22:55 AM  

idrow: [img.fark.net image 371x277]
forgive-a-ness, please.


Marge, that little guy is about to do something... I just know it.
 
2017-03-20 10:24:38 AM  

pikov.yndropov: I never really seen them as a "ruthless gang".  Most people who ended up hurt or killed knoew what they were getting into before they farked up.  I remember listening to this story told by some MMA fighter. Paraphrasing here;  Back in like 1998 or something.  Him and his friend were hanging out at a bar in Japan and his friend got into a fight with a Yakuza and sucker punched him.  The guy and fellow Yakuzi later caught him outside as they were leaving, formed a circle and forced the friend and Yakuza to fight it out.   The friend won out and the gang left. You know, instead of gunning both of them down mercilessly and possibly wounding/killing others.'


They may have some notions that simply shooting someone over a thing like that isn't the best way to show off how huge your dick is, but that doesn't stop them from indulging in the usual stuff like extortion, illegal gambling, various forms of corruption, assassinating the wrong guy, or the old favourite "use foreign women desperate to feed their families back home in the sex trade since they can't go to the police without getting throw out of the country".

They're criminals, and the laws they break are seldom there just because the law book wouldn't look as thick and imposing without them.
 
2017-03-20 10:29:25 AM  
I know who's taking care of the Yakuza:

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2017-03-20 10:58:06 AM  
The agency said the falling number of remaining members and arrests could be due to laws Japan adopted in 2011 that made it illegal for business owners to give money to gang members in exchange for protection

Yes, I'm pretty sure it's this kind of laser like focused legislative precision that is taking crime out.
 
2017-03-20 11:02:09 AM  

hubiestubert: The Yakuza have had some hard times. Or rather, a lot of different operations have been quietly transforming themselves to either go entirely legit, or in the case of the guys who used to strongarm the entertainment industry, it's just harder and harder to make a buck, especially without a huge Commie threat to make their activities kind of patriotic. Plus, recruitment has been kind of slow, to the point of taking in a LOT of Korean muscle, who can't advance in the ranks, which leads to folks either abandoning the Yakuza to make their own gangs, or just being sort of irritable at the pure blood Japanese leadership is getting older and older.

Then again, the Yakuza have been a part of the fabric of Japanese society for a long time. The Yakuza helped spark Japan's entrance to WWII by assassinating the Empress of Korea. They were in charge of getting folks hooked on opium in China. When the government betrayed them, they switched sides and helped the Allies, and then afterward helped quell labor unrest and keep things moving at the docks and around the country. They've been on the ropes before. They may still survive this, but their numbers ARE going to be heavily reduced, and that means that the bosozuko are going away forever, but the bukuto are just going underground for a while. Gurentai are probably going away, or at least limited to the point of being footnotes, but jiageya and jisageya are going to remain so long as there are crooked real estate deals to be made. Tekiya and sokaiya will remain, and some are even going semi-legit. And loan sharks will always sort of be in the background, so the seiriya will be relatively fine. The one thing that the Yakuza does do well is adapt to circumstances, and find NEW ways to scheme and profit. They'll contract, they'll eventually find ground that they can flourish under, and come back, albeit transformed a bit.


Who do you have in your Final Four?
 
2017-03-20 11:10:44 AM  

Parrahs: pikov.yndropov: I never really seen them as a "ruthless gang".  Most people who ended up hurt or killed knoew what they were getting into before they farked up.  I remember listening to this story told by some MMA fighter. Paraphrasing here;  Back in like 1998 or something.  Him and his friend were hanging out at a bar in Japan and his friend got into a fight with a Yakuza and sucker punched him.  The guy and fellow Yakuzi later caught him outside as they were leaving, formed a circle and forced the friend and Yakuza to fight it out.   The friend won out and the gang left. You know, instead of gunning both of them down mercilessly and possibly wounding/killing others.'

They may have some notions that simply shooting someone over a thing like that isn't the best way to show off how huge your dick is, but that doesn't stop them from indulging in the usual stuff like extortion, illegal gambling, various forms of corruption, assassinating the wrong guy, or the old favourite "use foreign women desperate to feed their families back home in the sex trade since they can't go to the police without getting throw out of the country".

They're criminals, and the laws they break are seldom there just because the law book wouldn't look as thick and imposing without them.


"Tokyo Vice" by Jake Adelstein is supposed to be a very good book about the yakuza.  I haven't read it, but I have seen excerpts and a number of interviews with the author (this NPR one is good), it's pretty illuminating.

Anyway, Adelstein appears to agree with your views.  They try to avoid violence against civilians because it makes them look bad and brings a lot of unwanted attention.  However, they're not shy about using violence, they're just good about disposing of bodies (yakuza own a lot of construction companies, so a lot of foundations to encase a body in) or making it look like a suicide (you can jump off the roof and probably die, or we can kill you here).  And of course they're engaged in a whole host of the usual mafia rackets; drugs  protection, prostitution, as well as some very sophisticated white collar crime.  Apparently they once took Lehman Brothers Japan for over $350 million in a fraud.
 
2017-03-20 11:19:21 AM  

Polish Hussar: Parrahs: pikov.yndropov: I never really seen them as a "ruthless gang".  Most people who ended up hurt or killed knoew what they were getting into before they farked up.  I remember listening to this story told by some MMA fighter. Paraphrasing here;  Back in like 1998 or something.  Him and his friend were hanging out at a bar in Japan and his friend got into a fight with a Yakuza and sucker punched him.  The guy and fellow Yakuzi later caught him outside as they were leaving, formed a circle and forced the friend and Yakuza to fight it out.   The friend won out and the gang left. You know, instead of gunning both of them down mercilessly and possibly wounding/killing others.'

They may have some notions that simply shooting someone over a thing like that isn't the best way to show off how huge your dick is, but that doesn't stop them from indulging in the usual stuff like extortion, illegal gambling, various forms of corruption, assassinating the wrong guy, or the old favourite "use foreign women desperate to feed their families back home in the sex trade since they can't go to the police without getting throw out of the country".

They're criminals, and the laws they break are seldom there just because the law book wouldn't look as thick and imposing without them.

"Tokyo Vice" by Jake Adelstein is supposed to be a very good book about the yakuza.  I haven't read it, but I have seen excerpts and a number of interviews with the author (this NPR one is good), it's pretty illuminating.

Anyway, Adelstein appears to agree with your views.  They try to avoid violence against civilians because it makes them look bad and brings a lot of unwanted attention.  However, they're not shy about using violence, they're just good about disposing of bodies (yakuza own a lot of construction companies, so a lot of foundations to encase a body in) or making it look like a suicide (you can jump off the roof and probably die, or we can kill you here).  And of course they're engaged in ...


It doesn't help that police don't classify "missing persons" cases as potential murders. It gives the Yakuza a LOT of wiggle room so long as the bodies never show up. It helps keep the police's records clean with homicide investigations, and it helps the Yakuza maintain their Robin Hood image in some popular culture.
 
2017-03-20 11:20:08 AM  
They lost a lot of street cred after that blonde woman kicked their butts with a sword, then killed their leader.
 
2017-03-20 11:27:10 AM  

hubiestubert: Polish Hussar: Parrahs: pikov.yndropov: I never really seen them as a "ruthless gang".  Most people who ended up hurt or killed knoew what they were getting into before they farked up.  I remember listening to this story told by some MMA fighter. Paraphrasing here;  Back in like 1998 or something.  Him and his friend were hanging out at a bar in Japan and his friend got into a fight with a Yakuza and sucker punched him.  The guy and fellow Yakuzi later caught him outside as they were leaving, formed a circle and forced the friend and Yakuza to fight it out.   The friend won out and the gang left. You know, instead of gunning both of them down mercilessly and possibly wounding/killing others.'

They may have some notions that simply shooting someone over a thing like that isn't the best way to show off how huge your dick is, but that doesn't stop them from indulging in the usual stuff like extortion, illegal gambling, various forms of corruption, assassinating the wrong guy, or the old favourite "use foreign women desperate to feed their families back home in the sex trade since they can't go to the police without getting throw out of the country".

They're criminals, and the laws they break are seldom there just because the law book wouldn't look as thick and imposing without them.

"Tokyo Vice" by Jake Adelstein is supposed to be a very good book about the yakuza.  I haven't read it, but I have seen excerpts and a number of interviews with the author (this NPR one is good), it's pretty illuminating.

Anyway, Adelstein appears to agree with your views.  They try to avoid violence against civilians because it makes them look bad and brings a lot of unwanted attention.  However, they're not shy about using violence, they're just good about disposing of bodies (yakuza own a lot of construction companies, so a lot of foundations to encase a body in) or making it look like a suicide (you can jump off the roof and probably die, or we can kill you here).  And of course they're engaged in ...

It doesn't help that police don't classify "missing persons" cases as potential murders. It gives the Yakuza a LOT of wiggle room so long as the bodies never show up. It helps keep the police's records clean with homicide investigations, and it helps the Yakuza maintain their Robin Hood image in some popular culture.


In the NPR interview I linked to, Adelstein says something like 10,000 people go missing in Japan each year.  And like you said, it's not counted as a murder without a body.  That's potentially a huge pool of uncounted homicides.
 
2017-03-20 11:32:17 AM  
Thanks to Roe v Wade, crime stats are on the way down.
 
2017-03-20 11:36:44 AM  

Polish Hussar: In the NPR interview I linked to, Adelstein says something like 10,000 people go missing in Japan each year.  And like you said, it's not counted as a murder without a body.  That's potentially a huge pool of uncounted homicides.


Well the Yakuza must be more active in the U.S. because we have like 700,000 missing each year.
 
2017-03-20 11:40:32 AM  
Sightings of Hugh Jackman all over Japan...
 
2017-03-20 11:47:29 AM  

lack of warmth: They lost a lot of street cred after that blonde woman kicked their butts with a sword, then killed their leader.


*saw what you did there.jpg*
 
2017-03-20 11:47:29 AM  

RedPhoenix122: However, games based on the Yakuza seem to be on the rise.

[img.fark.net image 250x313]


That game is farking awesome. Can't wait for the remake of the first game to drop this summer.
 
2017-03-20 11:48:38 AM  

hubiestubert: The Yakuza have had some hard times. Or rather, a lot of different operations have been quietly transforming themselves to either go entirely legit, or in the case of the guys who used to strongarm the entertainment industry, it's just harder and harder to make a buck, especially without a huge Commie threat to make their activities kind of patriotic. Plus, recruitment has been kind of slow, to the point of taking in a LOT of Korean muscle, who can't advance in the ranks, which leads to folks either abandoning the Yakuza to make their own gangs, or just being sort of irritable at the pure blood Japanese leadership is getting older and older.

Then again, the Yakuza have been a part of the fabric of Japanese society for a long time. The Yakuza helped spark Japan's entrance to WWII by assassinating the Empress of Korea. They were in charge of getting folks hooked on opium in China. When the government betrayed them, they switched sides and helped the Allies, and then afterward helped quell labor unrest and keep things moving at the docks and around the country. They've been on the ropes before. They may still survive this, but their numbers ARE going to be heavily reduced, and that means that the bosozuko are going away forever, but the bukuto are just going underground for a while. Gurentai are probably going away, or at least limited to the point of being footnotes, but jiageya and jisageya are going to remain so long as there are crooked real estate deals to be made. Tekiya and sokaiya will remain, and some are even going semi-legit. And loan sharks will always sort of be in the background, so the seiriya will be relatively fine. The one thing that the Yakuza does do well is adapt to circumstances, and find NEW ways to scheme and profit. They'll contract, they'll eventually find ground that they can flourish under, and come back, albeit transformed a bit.


WTF did I just read...
 
2017-03-20 11:54:52 AM  
The Yakuza took a big hit when the Japanese economy took a dive. They were heavily invested in companies and real estate. Plus, ordinary folks could no longer afford to take out loans, so there goes another chunk of their business.
 
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