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(SanDiego UnionTribune)   In not-creepy-at-all news, this California city wants to photograph and identify every single car's license plate in real time and link it to other government databases. In real time   ( sandiegouniontribune.com) divider line
    More: Creepy, Police, license plate readers, Crime, patrol cars, key Carlsbad intersections, Police Department project, City Council, automated license plate  
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4082 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Mar 2017 at 3:35 AM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-03-20 02:14:59 AM  
It's not like police departments don't already do this. It's just made official now, is all.
 
2017-03-20 02:27:37 AM  
 
2017-03-20 03:39:49 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2017-03-20 03:45:11 AM  
In other news, people begin smearing mud all over their license plates before entering Carlsbad.
 
2017-03-20 03:47:49 AM  

Gyrfalcon: In other news, people begin smearing mud all over their license plates before entering Carlsbad.


License plates are largely optional in California.
 
2017-03-20 03:48:04 AM  

Gyrfalcon: In other news, people begin smearing mud all over their license plates before entering Carlsbad.


In other news that is a farking stupid idea that gets you pulled over anyway. You don't win by being stupid.
 
2017-03-20 03:55:08 AM  
Eh.  A lot of cops I know run any random license plate they see; most cops are bored shiatless.  It's not as fun and exciting job as you might think for the average officer, especially in small towns.
 
2017-03-20 04:06:23 AM  
This violates the 4th Amendment as an unlawful dragnet.
 
2017-03-20 04:08:11 AM  

Norad: Gyrfalcon: In other news, people begin smearing mud all over their license plates before entering Carlsbad.

In other news that is a farking stupid idea that gets you pulled over anyway. You don't win by being stupid.


In other news, you can say;
"Kids, I was there when it began."

/"...and it sucketh mightily."
//"They'd been telling us for years that the most important thing was for us to be "safe," safe meaning more cameras, more cops. And, we believed it.
///All the while forgetting the basic premise of fee-based government entities--criminal justice, judicial systems--if you want to create more revenue
create more criminals.

They're going to make a fortune.

And, your community will drool with envy.  Then, it will happen to you.
Forgotten parking ticket?
Eventually.
 
2017-03-20 04:11:48 AM  

fusillade762: [img.fark.net image 850x478]


i.ytimg.com

// on the same page
 
2017-03-20 04:15:44 AM  
I think this more about 'us vs them' than it is about spying on everyone. The people who propose this want, and expect, this system to allow their police to zero in on and hassle outsiders. Eventually outsiders will be intimidated enough to just stay away. The spying aspect doesn't bother them because for whatever reason they can't even imagine that the authorities would use surveillance powers against everyone, not just the bad guys.
 
2017-03-20 04:26:48 AM  
LOL.

Anyone that can't see though this is kidding themselves and ALPR/ANPR can be defeated with a $50 printer and a reasonable camera.

Photograph a legit plate, print it out, and put it over the marked plate.

High school students figured this out years ago and were doing it intentionally to trigger photo tickets to their enemies, which only would be dismissed because of vehicle type mismatch.

This technology is a weight around the neck of liberty and one more restriction on the inherent human right to be able to travel freely.
 
2017-03-20 04:28:14 AM  

fusillade762: [img.fark.net image 850x478]


That's the failing New York Journal to you, buddy.
 
2017-03-20 04:55:27 AM  
Keep in mind that every perfect world utopian future image has self driving cars that are all connected, license plates won't even be needed as you will have and identifiable serial number. So, get over it.
 
2017-03-20 04:58:49 AM  
Australian here. We have cameras that cover certain roads, they're signposted in advance. They pick up folks going too fast between two cameras, also unregistered vehicles and presumably flag cars associated with wanted people etc with the cops. We've had them for years generally uncontroversially.

But here all our cops and all their information is under state not municipal control, not sure if that makes it better or worse.
 
2017-03-20 05:03:03 AM  
Four council members, however, said they're confident the information can be kept secure

Oh that's some funny shiat right there.
 
2017-03-20 05:04:33 AM  
Wasting $1 million to do this is the lede here.
 
2017-03-20 05:13:24 AM  
I guess I was under the assumption that our red light cameras already did this in NJ. We're required to have front plates.

I've never heard of a fugitive being apprehended by virtue of a traffic cam though, so I might be wrong.

It will happen soon though. Nobody does police state like NJ.
 
2017-03-20 05:20:51 AM  
What are they going to do about cyclists? A rolling menace, untamed and unchecked!
 
2017-03-20 05:30:11 AM  

UsikFark: What are they going to do about cyclists? A rolling menace, untamed and unchecked!


And we're stoned as fark too.
 
2017-03-20 05:43:20 AM  

UsikFark: What are they going to do about cyclists? A rolling menace, untamed and unchecked!


Don't forget untaxed.
 
2017-03-20 06:01:19 AM  

Harry_Seldon: This violates the 4th Amendment as an unlawful dragnet.


Dragnet is lawful in LA.
 
2017-03-20 06:13:59 AM  

Todd300: LOL.

Anyone that can't see though this is kidding themselves and ALPR/ANPR can be defeated with a $50 printer and a reasonable camera.

Photograph a legit plate, print it out, and put it over the marked plate.


Then hope the legit plate is registered to the same make, model, colour and age of the car, then hope the registered keeper of that car has not been disqualified from driving, has valid insurance and no outstanding warrants. Oh, you are in the US, never mind, carry on.
 
2017-03-20 06:18:07 AM  

Deep Contact: Harry_Seldon: This violates the 4th Amendment as an unlawful dragnet.

Dragnet is lawful in LA.


As long as they use 1950's technology.
 
2017-03-20 06:22:42 AM  

UsikFark: Four council members, however, said they're confident the information can be kept secure

Oh that's some funny shiat right there.


This.  They're either lying or idiots.

/or both
 
2017-03-20 06:25:19 AM  

drjekel_mrhyde: This is creepier http://www.techspot.com/news/68568-minnesota-judge-grants-warrant-whol​e-town-search-history.html


That's interesting; the actual scope isn't quite town-wide, since they're only looking for people who specifically searched only on Google for a specific image...the problem is, why limit it to the town?  they must have some other evidence regarding the thief's location...the internet isn't limited to Bumfark, Minnesota...
 
2017-03-20 06:38:31 AM  
Odds are these cities are controlled by lunatic lefties?  Oh wait its CA so of course they are!  Keep defending the progressives, people.
 
2017-03-20 06:40:49 AM  

KrispykremeMcDonalds: Odds are these cities are controlled by lunatic lefties?  Oh wait its CA so of course they are!  Keep defending the progressives, people.


Bless your heart.
 
2017-03-20 06:48:32 AM  

KrispykremeMcDonalds: Odds are these cities are controlled by lunatic lefties?  Oh wait its CA so of course they are!  Keep defending the progressives, people.


i.ytimg.com
 
2017-03-20 06:53:30 AM  
I wonder which city council members are receiving kickbacks from the company that will operate the cameras?
 
2017-03-20 06:54:25 AM  

Kerr Avon: Todd300: LOL.

Anyone that can't see though this is kidding themselves and ALPR/ANPR can be defeated with a $50 printer and a reasonable camera.

Photograph a legit plate, print it out, and put it over the marked plate.

Then hope the legit plate is registered to the same make, model, colour and age of the car, then hope the registered keeper of that car has not been disqualified from driving, has valid insurance and no outstanding warrants. Oh, you are in the US, never mind, carry on.


Shut up dipshiat. In many jurisimydictions, they can do all that already.
 
2017-03-20 07:02:04 AM  

wxboy: I wonder which city council members are receiving kickbacks from the company that will operate the cameras?


Retired former police officer I'm guessing.
 
2017-03-20 07:05:23 AM  
deepfocusreview.com

Funny enough, also takes place in California.
 
2017-03-20 07:12:42 AM  

H31N0US: I guess I was under the assumption that our red light cameras already did this in NJ. We're required to have front plates.


NJ does have a license plate reading system, but it's not with the red lights.  They've added scanners to police cruisers, usually two strange little box-looking devices mounted on either side of the trunk.

https://goo.gl/RmnHHE

Every time the car passes a license plate, it's number is GPS tagged and time-stamped.  It's supposed to be to help combat car theft, but most effectiveness studies just show it being a massive data collection scheme.
 
2017-03-20 07:27:22 AM  

noitsnot: Gyrfalcon: In other news, people begin smearing mud all over their license plates before entering Carlsbad.

License plates are largely optional in California.


Going plateless here can get you all sorts of negative cop attention.
 
2017-03-20 07:29:05 AM  

UsikFark: What are they going to do about cyclists? A rolling menace, untamed and unchecked!


On the way to work last night I passed a guy on a bicycle: dark clothes, no reflectors on bike (not in spokes or on front or rear of bike), poorly lit section of road.  Thankfully, my headlamps work quite nicely.  Still, the douchey part of me wanted to hit him on principle.
 
2017-03-20 07:39:30 AM  
Nope.  Fails the "Jews in the Attic" test.
 
2017-03-20 07:46:45 AM  

Bonzo_1116: noitsnot: Gyrfalcon: In other news, people begin smearing mud all over their license plates before entering Carlsbad.

License plates are largely optional in California.

Going plateless here can get you all sorts of negative cop attention.


I went plateless for a few weeks.  No issue until I went to drive-thru at a bank to make a deposit. They called the police.

(i couldn't find my new tag and had the license plate in the car.  i got off with a warning about putting the plate back on until I found the tags)
 
2017-03-20 07:48:00 AM  

wxboy: I wonder which city council members are receiving kickbacks from the company that will operate the cameras?


Carlsbad has a lot of tech companies in it. I'd bet one of them is behind this.
 
2017-03-20 07:53:41 AM  
WTF California?

Half your cities want to let felon "undocumented immigrants" hide from the feds, the other half want to do shiat like this.

Get it together.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2017-03-20 07:56:56 AM  
License plates are largely optional in California.

Not as much as they used to be.
 
2017-03-20 08:07:13 AM  

ZAZ: License plates are largely optional in California.

Not as much as they used to be.


Yep, they're closing the "Jobs Loophole", which allowed a driver to go up to six months without plates.  Starting in 2019, CA drivers will have to get temporary plates for a newly-purchased vehicle.

img.fark.net
 
2017-03-20 08:08:19 AM  

UsikFark: Four council members, however, said they're confident the information can be kept secure

Oh that's some funny shiat right there.


I'd love to get their thoughts about "the cyber"

Deep Contact: Harry_Seldon: This violates the 4th Amendment as an unlawful dragnet.

Dragnet is lawful in LA.


assless goat skin chaps, not so much.
 
2017-03-20 08:10:39 AM  

AngryDragon: WTF California?

Half your cities want to let felon "undocumented immigrants" hide from the feds, the other half want to do shiat like this.

Get it together.


Libs have never been accused of being logical. Stop expecting it and your life will go more smoothly.
 
2017-03-20 08:11:57 AM  

themindiswatching: It's not like police departments don't already do this. It's just made official now, is all.


Charleston, SC, has had plate readers for almost a decade already.  It's definitely not news.

"In May 2007, SeaHawk, with assistance from the South Carolina Research Authority, began setting up an Automated License Plate Recognition, or ALPR, program. There were two fixed cameras, one in North Charleston and another in Charleston. There also were several federal grants made to local and state agencies to install mobile cameras in vehicles.
There were more than 650,000 images in the ALPR database by the fall of 2009, according to a report posted on a camera manufacturer's website.
By the end of March, that number had grown to more than 11 million, said Reggie Lloyd, director of the State Law Enforcement Division, which currently maintains the database.
In many cases, there may be multiple shots of a car or vehicle. Lloyd said he does not know how often the database is purged.
In 2009, Project SeaHawk and its funding were shuttled from the Department of Justice to the Department of Homeland Security. The grant for the ALPR program was given to SLED."
 
2017-03-20 08:18:43 AM  

TechCom: Kerr Avon: Todd300: LOL.

Anyone that can't see though this is kidding themselves and ALPR/ANPR can be defeated with a $50 printer and a reasonable camera.

Photograph a legit plate, print it out, and put it over the marked plate.

Then hope the legit plate is registered to the same make, model, colour and age of the car, then hope the registered keeper of that car has not been disqualified from driving, has valid insurance and no outstanding warrants. Oh, you are in the US, never mind, carry on.

Shut up dipshiat. In many jurisimydictions, they can do all that already.


They can indeed, you're still missing the point tough guy.
 
2017-03-20 08:21:02 AM  

Kraftwerk Orange: themindiswatching: It's not like police departments don't already do this. It's just made official now, is all.

Charleston, SC, has had plate readers for almost a decade already.  It's definitely not news.

"In May 2007, SeaHawk, with assistance from the South Carolina Research Authority, began setting up an Automated License Plate Recognition, or ALPR, program. There were two fixed cameras, one in North Charleston and another in Charleston. There also were several federal grants made to local and state agencies to install mobile cameras in vehicles.
There were more than 650,000 images in the ALPR database by the fall of 2009, according to a report posted on a camera manufacturer's website.
By the end of March, that number had grown to more than 11 million, said Reggie Lloyd, director of the State Law Enforcement Division, which currently maintains the database.
In many cases, there may be multiple shots of a car or vehicle. Lloyd said he does not know how often the database is purged.
In 2009, Project SeaHawk and its funding were shuttled from the Department of Justice to the Department of Homeland Security. The grant for the ALPR program was given to SLED."


Posting on the right thread, You'd think that they have so much useless bullshiat in there by this time that whatever real data is in there that may stop the next 9/11 is buried a 100 times over.
 
2017-03-20 08:23:38 AM  

KrispykremeMcDonalds: Odds are these cities are controlled by lunatic lefties?  Oh wait its CA so of course they are!  Keep defending the progressives, people.


Kraftwerk Orange: themindiswatching: It's not like police departments don't already do this. It's just made official now, is all.

Charleston, SC, has had plate readers for almost a decade already.  It's definitely not news.

"In May 2007, SeaHawk, with assistance from the South Carolina Research Authority, began setting up an Automated License Plate Recognition, or ALPR, program. There were two fixed cameras, one in North Charleston and another in Charleston. There also were several federal grants made to local and state agencies to install mobile cameras in vehicles.
There were more than 650,000 images in the ALPR database by the fall of 2009, according to a report posted on a camera manufacturer's website.
By the end of March, that number had grown to more than 11 million, said Reggie Lloyd, director of the State Law Enforcement Division, which currently maintains the database.
In many cases, there may be multiple shots of a car or vehicle. Lloyd said he does not know how often the database is purged.
In 2009, Project SeaHawk and its funding were shuttled from the Department of Justice to the Department of Homeland Security. The grant for the ALPR program was given to SLED."


Damn. Don't you hate when simple facts ruin your narrative?
 
2017-03-20 08:24:23 AM  
Someone could do well for themselves in the future by getting in on this now, and programming exceptions into the systems at a deep level.
 
2017-03-20 08:30:23 AM  
The US Office of Personnel Management couldn't keep their files secure, and this city thinks they can with a wireless system?

Um yeah, go ahead and keep thinking that.
 
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