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(Yahoo)   Americans are quitting their jobs at the fastest rate in 16 years. No doubt so they can replace all those jobs illegals are doing, or in preparation for getting that new job building the wall   ( finance.yahoo.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, U.S. economy, Economics, Jamie Dimon, United States, Economy of the United States, confidence, small business optimism, President Donald Trump  
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902 clicks; posted to Business » on 17 Mar 2017 at 10:20 AM (30 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-03-17 09:57:19 AM  
Nice way to spin good economic news as anti-Trump spin.
 
2017-03-17 09:57:58 AM  
Thank goodness they'll have a living minimum wage and affordable healthcare.
 
2017-03-17 10:23:26 AM  

dittybopper: Nice way to spin good economic news as anti-Trump spin.


Perhaps people are thinking that if the ACA is wrecked, it will become vital to have a job with health benefits, so it's now or never.
 
2017-03-17 10:25:19 AM  
"A major highlight in this report was a drop in the number of businesses citing government red tape as their biggest problem."

It's amazing what has changed in a couple months...seriously?
 
2017-03-17 10:29:25 AM  
That sounds insane to me.  We're already overdue for a recession based on market trends, and Trump's budget is a horror-show when you look at how it will affect the economy.  Deregulation is only going to amplify issues.  At this point I am trying to decide when is the right time to move reallocate into bonds or international stocks.
 
2017-03-17 10:32:54 AM  
Oh that isn't good.  The coming self-correction of the market is going to suck and the sudden shift in unemployment numbers from where they are to probably double digit rates is going to really hit home.  The problem is the 1% will double down and claim that lower taxes will help hire workers, not paying the middle class more so they have greater disposable income to spend to increase business.
 
2017-03-17 10:33:36 AM  

dittybopper: Nice way to spin good economic news as anti-Trump spin.


So now the US economy is finally showing positive news? Not 5 months ago? Not a year ago? Not two years ago? Not 4 months ago?
 
2017-03-17 10:49:53 AM  

sign_of_Zeta: That sounds insane to me.  We're already overdue for a recession based on market trends, and Trump's budget is a horror-show when you look at how it will affect the economy.  Deregulation is only going to amplify issues.  At this point I am trying to decide when is the right time to move reallocate into bonds or international stocks.


I've been debating between my job that pays pretty well that I don't enjoy vs. trying to find something I do enjoy. I'd imagine a pharmacy job would be pretty safe in an economic downturn since people will still get sick, but at some point I may end up just ragequitting since rx tech is a pretty thankless job, and working with the general public slowly destroys your soul, whether retail, foodservice, etc. I'd like out, but I also don't want to be swept up in an economic downturn that screws me over and wipes out my savings.
 
2017-03-17 10:53:09 AM  
Upward slope since 2010, when Obama finally pulled us out of the Great Recession? Sure, let's give all that credit to Trump, who's been in office for 2 months.

Seriously, you can snap a line from 2010 to now - a term and a half of Obama's two-term presidency - but the spin in the article is "Look what a great job Trump's doing!"

The article should read "Obama's hard work and momentum has not yet been halted by Trump's bullshiat."
 
2017-03-17 10:54:21 AM  

dittybopper: Nice way to spin good economic news as anti-Trump spin.


Are you crazy? To the liberal there is no such thing as good news for at least the next 4 years.
And really, the way the left has been acting, I think it's going to be 8.
 
2017-03-17 10:57:01 AM  

kittyhas1000legs: sign_of_Zeta: That sounds insane to me.  We're already overdue for a recession based on market trends, and Trump's budget is a horror-show when you look at how it will affect the economy.  Deregulation is only going to amplify issues.  At this point I am trying to decide when is the right time to move reallocate into bonds or international stocks.

I've been debating between my job that pays pretty well that I don't enjoy vs. trying to find something I do enjoy. I'd imagine a pharmacy job would be pretty safe in an economic downturn since people will still get sick, but at some point I may end up just ragequitting since rx tech is a pretty thankless job, and working with the general public slowly destroys your soul, whether retail, foodservice, etc. I'd like out, but I also don't want to be swept up in an economic downturn that screws me over and wipes out my savings.


Go read what newspapers had to say about the economy around September 3, 1929, when the stock market hit a peak that it wouldn't see again for about 25 years. Then, go read what they had to say about the same economy three months later.
 
2017-03-17 11:12:35 AM  

itcamefromschenectady: dittybopper: Nice way to spin good economic news as anti-Drumpf spin.

Perhaps people are thinking that if the ACA is wrecked, it will become vital to have a job with health benefits, so it's now or never.


That seems exactly backward to me. I've been very seriously considering retirement at about age 50, but health care costs are the biggest risk to me. If an evolving ACA were a decent assumption, retirement would probably be a safe option. But for now, I think there's really no telling about what insurance availability and costs will be in just a year or two. Getting on an ACA plan now isn't going to help if coverage, accessibility, and affordability change drastically.

Do you think people quitting are just 'taking time off' and plan B is to rejoin the workforce if employer-based insurance again becomes the only viable option? Maybe so, but I don't think I can do that. When I'm out, that's it, no part-time work, no teaching, no consulting, and definitely no return to the grind.
 
2017-03-17 11:13:15 AM  
Regardless of who's president, is quitting your job during a change in administration when there will be a slew of policy changes that have unforeseen consequences in the economy? I guess if you feel you can find a job quickly, it works out well, but that just seems like poor planning.
 
2017-03-17 11:26:23 AM  

DubyaHater: Regardless of who's president, is quitting your job during a change in administration when there will be a slew of policy changes that have unforeseen consequences in the economy? I guess if you feel you can find a job quickly, it works out well, but that just seems like poor planning.


Since everything is shifting continuously, and policy changes typically take a very long time to reflect in budgeting, industry moves, and regulatory reform, it's not really that much different than any other time.

The concern currently is where and when the current market is likely to peak.  We're overdue on the historic timeline, though since recovery was more measured, it may take longer to hit the inflection point.  We're not going to maintain a 20+K growing Dow and a sub 5% unemployment rate for long.  We've had continuous job growth for something like 77 straight months.

For all of the biatching about sub 3% growth, it's probably the only reason we haven't set ourselves on fire again.
 
2017-03-17 11:28:34 AM  

DubyaHater: Regardless of who's president, is quitting your job during a change in administration when there will be a slew of policy changes that have unforeseen consequences in the economy? I guess if you feel you can find a job quickly, it works out well, but that just seems like poor planning.


I don't think quitting necessary means these people don't have another job offer.
 
2017-03-17 11:43:50 AM  
I'm holding out for one of those sweet coal mine jobs with no safety regulations or minimum wage. Sounds lie a bright future.
 
2017-03-17 11:51:00 AM  

Khellendros: DubyaHater: Regardless of who's president, is quitting your job during a change in administration when there will be a slew of policy changes that have unforeseen consequences in the economy? I guess if you feel you can find a job quickly, it works out well, but that just seems like poor planning.

Since everything is shifting continuously, and policy changes typically take a very long time to reflect in budgeting, industry moves, and regulatory reform, it's not really that much different than any other time.

The concern currently is where and when the current market is likely to peak.  We're overdue on the historic timeline, though since recovery was more measured, it may take longer to hit the inflection point.  We're not going to maintain a 20+K growing Dow and a sub 5% unemployment rate for long.  We've had continuous job growth for something like 77 straight months.

For all of the biatching about sub 3% growth, it's probably the only reason we haven't set ourselves on fire again.


I'm of the opinion that, if the economy tanks and companies start cutting their workforce, the newest employees are first on the chopping block. I'm probably a little too neurotic, but it's just my feeling.
 
2017-03-17 11:51:18 AM  

dittybopper: Nice way to spin good economic news as anti-Trump spin.


Here is how you spin economic data...

img.fark.net
img.fark.net
 
2017-03-17 12:09:05 PM  

DubyaHater: I'm of the opinion that, if the economy tanks and companies start cutting their workforce, the newest employees are first on the chopping block. I'm probably a little too neurotic, but it's just my feeling.


I thinks it's going to be the older workforce.  During the 2008 crisis, most places halted hiring and cut loose their youngest workers.  Now a lot of places are having people retiring and no one to take their places.  They can't afford to cut the newest employees.  Of course, cutting the older employees has all sorts of other issues.
 
2017-03-17 12:19:32 PM  

itcamefromschenectady: "A major highlight in this report was a drop in the number of businesses citing government red tape as their biggest problem."

It's amazing what has changed in a couple months...seriously?


The people who felt they were being regulated to death without being able to specifically point to bad regulations now feel those regulations are gone.
 
2017-03-17 12:46:25 PM  

hugram: dittybopper: Nice way to spin good economic news as anti-Trump spin.

Here is how you spin economic data...

[img.fark.net image 681x799]
[img.fark.net image 694x854]


www.longstoryshortpier.com
 
2017-03-17 01:10:11 PM  

OccamsWhiskers: itcamefromschenectady: dittybopper: Nice way to spin good economic news as anti-Drumpf spin.

Perhaps people are thinking that if the ACA is wrecked, it will become vital to have a job with health benefits, so it's now or never.

That seems exactly backward to me. I've been very seriously considering retirement at about age 50, but health care costs are the biggest risk to me. If an evolving ACA were a decent assumption, retirement would probably be a safe option. But for now, I think there's really no telling about what insurance availability and costs will be in just a year or two. Getting on an ACA plan now isn't going to help if coverage, accessibility, and affordability change drastically.

Do you think people quitting are just 'taking time off' and plan B is to rejoin the workforce if employer-based insurance again becomes the only viable option? Maybe so, but I don't think I can do that. When I'm out, that's it, no part-time work, no teaching, no consulting, and definitely no return to the grind.


I wouldn't count on Employer provided insurance, either. In one version of AHCA, there is a provision to remove the tax deductiblilty of payroll deducted premiums as part of the "simplification of rules" theory Trump espouses.That would be enough of an excuse for smaller employers to drop coverage.
 
2017-03-17 01:15:09 PM  
I know my entire department has been inundated with recruiter calls try to poach people. It's annoying but also fairly reassuring because it means my industry (which is very closely tied to the general economy) is doing well. As soon as the calls stop, I know it's time to expect trouble. You know, if shiat hasn't hit the fan already.
 
2017-03-17 01:23:09 PM  

dittybopper: Nice way to spin good economic news as anti-Trump spin.


Maybe subby was just trying to counter the article's pro-Trump spin.

The first line of TFA: Employed Americans are quitting their jobs like crazy in another sign that under President Donald Trump, confidence across the U.S. economy is rising.
 
2017-03-17 01:26:22 PM  

hugram: dittybopper: Nice way to spin good economic news as anti-Trump spin.

So now the US economy is finally showing positive news? Not 5 months ago? Not a year ago? Not two years ago? Not 4 months ago?


The Great Bush Recovery has finally begun now that the Clinton Crash is over!

/am I doing it rite?
 
2017-03-17 01:27:44 PM  

mrsleep: dittybopper: Nice way to spin good economic news as anti-Trump spin.

Are you crazy? To the liberal there is no such thing as good news for at least the next 4 years.
And really, the way the left has been acting, I think it's going to be 8.


Swap in Republicans and the past 8 years and you nailed it.
 
2017-03-17 01:28:13 PM  
I agree that people quitting jobs is a sign the economy is good, but I think it's more complex that simply knowing they can get a new job.

If a married person is very secure about their job, getting plenty of hours, or commissions, or whatever, then their spouse can leave the workforce and purse other interests (get more education, be a homemaker full time, retire, etc).
 
2017-03-17 01:45:12 PM  
Left my $14 hr job because of perpetual 10 hours mandatory overtime worthless supervisors using negative reinforcement, micromanaging and harassment.

Now got a 30 hour job, that pays $11 an hour and is so much more enjoyable to work at.

It is the idiots with MBAs and business degree who dont care about workers are The problem
 
2017-03-17 01:47:22 PM  

sign_of_Zeta: That sounds insane to me.  We're already overdue for a recession based on market trends, and Trump's budget is a horror-show when you look at how it will affect the economy.  Deregulation is only going to amplify issues.  At this point I am trying to decide when is the right time to move reallocate into bonds or international stocks.


His budget is a mixed bag.  Deficits, and lots of infrastructure, including defense, spending are actually good for the economy, so as as you don't let the spending get too out of control.  His biggest problem isn't in his spending, it's in the areas where he wants to cut.  Things like contraception, sex education, environmental protection, and most of the other "evil" parts big government that Republicans hate actually serve to keep costs down.
 
2017-03-17 02:23:24 PM  

odinsposse: itcamefromschenectady: "A major highlight in this report was a drop in the number of businesses citing government red tape as their biggest problem."

It's amazing what has changed in a couple months...seriously?

The people who felt they were being regulated to death without being able to specifically point to bad regulations now feel those regulations are gone.


To them I say
img.fark.net
 
2017-03-17 02:54:05 PM  

FormlessOne: kittyhas1000legs: sign_of_Zeta: That sounds insane to me.  We're already overdue for a recession based on market trends, and Trump's budget is a horror-show when you look at how it will affect the economy.  Deregulation is only going to amplify issues.  At this point I am trying to decide when is the right time to move reallocate into bonds or international stocks.

I've been debating between my job that pays pretty well that I don't enjoy vs. trying to find something I do enjoy. I'd imagine a pharmacy job would be pretty safe in an economic downturn since people will still get sick, but at some point I may end up just ragequitting since rx tech is a pretty thankless job, and working with the general public slowly destroys your soul, whether retail, foodservice, etc. I'd like out, but I also don't want to be swept up in an economic downturn that screws me over and wipes out my savings.

Go read what newspapers had to say about the economy around September 3, 1929, when the stock market hit a peak that it wouldn't see again for about 25 years. Then, go read what they had to say about the same economy three months later.


img.fark.net
 
2017-03-17 03:10:28 PM  

DubyaHater: I'm of the opinion that, if the economy tanks and companies start cutting their workforce, the newest employees are first on the chopping block. I'm probably a little too neurotic, but it's just my feeling.


Seniority hasn't been the primary basis for layoff decisions in 20 years.  In the corporate world, it's about expense in your job/pay band.  All other delivery being equal, expensive employees (in their job) tend to go first.

So unless you moved to a position where you were hired in at the top of your pay band, you're (likely) not first on the block.  Now, if you're in a union or government position, it's different.  Seniority matters more.  But that's outdated thinking for most industries.
 
2017-03-17 04:13:04 PM  

kittyhas1000legs: and working with the general public slowly destroys your soul


Truer words never spoken typed.
 
2017-03-17 04:15:56 PM  

El Dudereno: I'm holding out for one of those sweet coal mine jobs with no safety regulations or minimum wage. Sounds lie a bright future.


But less regulation means more money for the coal companies. This means they can raise wages for their miners.

/ Right ?
// hello ?
 
2017-03-17 04:24:42 PM  
Another Government Employee:
I wouldn't count on Employer provided insurance, either. In one version of AHCA, there is a provision to remove the tax deductiblilty of payroll deducted premiums as part of the "simplification of rules" theory Trump espouses.That would be enough of an excuse for smaller employers to drop coverage.

I read this too. I have trouble believing this will come to pass (or at least hope it won't). The total outlay for my family's healthcare (employer + employee contribution) is on the order of $20k+. To have to pay tax on that, especially if taxed as straight income, would be catastrophic. 90+% of all Americans with employer paid healthcare would go belly up overnight and/or forced to drop it.
 
2017-03-17 04:28:28 PM  

Nick Nostril: El Dudereno: I'm holding out for one of those sweet coal mine jobs with no safety regulations or minimum wage. Sounds lie a bright future.

But less regulation means more money for the coal companies. This means they can raise wages for their miners.

/ Right ?
// hello ?


Yep, they sure can. Blessed be the almighty job creators and their benevolent wisdom.
 
2017-03-17 11:48:31 PM  
I'll take one of those vacancies please
 
2017-03-18 04:24:41 PM  
Summer's coming, and 6 months of unemployment insurance is a pretty sweet deal. We can all pretend we're teachers!!! :)
 
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