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(Denver Channel)   A heads-up to all of you who may be thinking of replacing that old refrigerator you've got in the garage keeping beers and such cold: newer ones may not work out there   ( thedenverchannel.com) divider line
    More: Fail, Refrigerator, new high efficiency, Heat, Absorption refrigerator, old garage fridge, broken Kenmore refrigerator, repairman, Schubert  
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4323 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Mar 2017 at 6:34 AM (30 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-03-16 11:20:34 PM  
As to this specific user, if you can't see the manual before you buy a reasonable person standard applies and you can expect the warranty to cover the use in a garage if you've previously used a refrigerator of the same type (not a natural gas refrigerator) in the same place.

You can't add absurd warranty terms without disclosing them, so says the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.
 
2017-03-16 11:24:37 PM  
fark new appliances.
 
2017-03-16 11:29:47 PM  

feckingmorons: As to this specific user, if you can't see the manual before you buy a reasonable person standard applies and you can expect the warranty to cover the use in a garage if you've previously used a refrigerator of the same type (not a natural gas refrigerator) in the same place.

You can't add absurd warranty terms without disclosing them, so says the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.

  Full marks.   See also "implied warranty of merchantability"
 
2017-03-17 02:45:36 AM  
When I was growing up, we had my maternal grandparent's mid 1940s Kenmore refrigerator as our only refrigerator until I was in high school. It had a freezer just barely bigger than the size of two six packs of beer.

It ran like a champ at least until we moved across country in 1970. Dad jujst could not see dragging it from Florida to Michigan, so he gave it to a neighbor. I would not be surprised if it were still running.

OTOH, in 1978, when my ex and I bought our first refrigerator for our first house when we were married, we bought a Kenmore. One week later, the handle to the main door came off. The repair guy sent out under warrentee told us that it was palatic and the glue used to put it on actually ate away at the plastic, causing this. Wonderful.
 
2017-03-17 04:03:16 AM  

Aulus: When I was growing up, we had my maternal grandparent's mid 1940s Kenmore refrigerator as our only refrigerator until I was in high school. It had a freezer just barely bigger than the size of two six packs of beer.

It ran like a champ at least until we moved across country in 1970. Dad jujst could not see dragging it from Florida to Michigan, so he gave it to a neighbor. I would not be surprised if it were still running.

OTOH, in 1978, when my ex and I bought our first refrigerator for our first house when we were married, we bought a Kenmore. One week later, the handle to the main door came off. The repair guy sent out under warrentee told us that it was palatic and the glue used to put it on actually ate away at the plastic, causing this. Wonderful.


There is a brand of aftermarket fuel pump that uses hoses not designed to sit in gasoline.

Ask me how I know!!!  :D

:(
 
2017-03-17 07:03:04 AM  
Me in the summer, at least once a month.

Customer: "The garage refrigerator isn't working!"

Me: "It's about 120 degrees in here."

Customer: "Yeah?"
.
Me: "So how can the refrigerator shed heat? Residential refrigerators are designed to work in a setting that's between 65-85 degrees. If it's not working in September, call me."

Fast forward to January. It's 6 degrees outside because f^(& a whole bunch of Kansas winter.

Customer: "My garage refrigerator isn't working..............."
 
2017-03-17 07:51:20 AM  
This story has been posted for over 8 hours, and no one's pointed out that his first problem was buying an appliance at S-Mart?  We stopped doing that 20 years ago when a dishwasher leaked a month after install.
 
2017-03-17 07:51:38 AM  
My guess is the fridge in the article probably failed from reasons other than being in the garage. The only change in the situation may be the wording in the warranty.
 
2017-03-17 08:12:10 AM  
1965 Frigidaire
s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com
 
2017-03-17 08:19:33 AM  
I think the bigger story is that someone used the term 'prompt' when referring to sear's warranty repair service.
 
2017-03-17 08:26:57 AM  
God i miss my grandfather's philco fridge.  Dang thing finally died in 09.
 
2017-03-17 08:34:45 AM  
Ok nerds, 'splain to me why this is happening.
 
2017-03-17 08:37:14 AM  

dFunk: Ok nerds, 'splain to me why this is happening.


The fridge has to maintain a relatively constant temperature around 40F. If the garage is too hot, it can't do this. If the garage is too cold, it can't do this.
 
2017-03-17 08:41:57 AM  

foo monkey: dFunk: Ok nerds, 'splain to me why this is happening.

The fridge has to maintain a relatively constant temperature around 40F. If the garage is too hot, it can't do this. If the garage is too cold, it can't do this.


Why were older fridges able to do this?
 
2017-03-17 08:46:20 AM  

foo monkey: dFunk: Ok nerds, 'splain to me why this is happening.

The fridge has to maintain a relatively constant temperature around 40F. If the garage is too hot, it can't do this. If the garage is too cold, it can't do this.


Yet they somehow overcame this issue 60-70 years ago.
 
2017-03-17 08:50:47 AM  

dFunk: Ok nerds, 'splain to me why this is happening.


Refrigeration works by compressing a fluid and then letting it decompress in a controlled fashion.  The decompression cause it to get cold.  Moving air across the decompression coils cause it to blow cold air into the area you want.  What is really happening is you are truly tranferring heat into the decompressed fluid (thing don't get cold, heat/energy just moves somewhere else... more or less).    This heated fluid is carried out to the outside of the area you are cooling, where it is not only compressed again, but radiators shed heat to the outside environment.  This is why you have coils on the back of the frig and the big thing full of aluminium fins on your air conditioner.  It is transferring heat into the outside environment.  If the heat your cooling system is trying to transfer to the outside air is cooler than the outside air, well, it does not really transfer any heat out of the system.

Now, not sure 100% about when its really cold outside, but I would think you are basically reversing the system. You are heating the inside of the box moderately while cooling the outside.
 
2017-03-17 08:57:34 AM  
The type of coolant used in refrigerators has changed due to environmental concerns.  Older units used R12 which was able to be used in a greater temperature range.  New units use R134a that will not work the same in temperatures that are too cold or too warm.
 
2017-03-17 09:23:03 AM  

charliebear: The type of coolant used in refrigerators has changed due to environmental concerns.  Older units used R12 which was able to be used in a greater temperature range.  New units use R134a that will not work the same in temperatures that are too cold or too warm.


Be nice if the article has this juicy bit of detail to explain WHY?  Rather than just, "it's in the manual."
 
2017-03-17 09:24:30 AM  
So next important question...Are there new refrigerators available that ARE designed to work in temp extremes?
 
2017-03-17 09:25:45 AM  

Mycroft_Holmes_IV: So next important question...Are there new refrigerators available that ARE designed to work in temp extremes?


Yeah, I'd be curious to know as well...my garage fridge is probably not long for this world, and I'd like to start pricing replacements.
 
2017-03-17 09:26:18 AM  
Honestly, I thought it was common knowledge that refrigerators have a specific temperature range where they can function.

But the main problem the guy in the article had, I think, is that you should never trust the freezer portion of a combo freezer/fridge that you keep in the garage.  I bet that the fridge side worked like a champ.  I also have a suspicion that a chest freezer would have stayed frozen, as well.
 
2017-03-17 09:34:19 AM  

wingnut396: If the heat your cooling system is trying to transfer to the outside air is cooler than the outside air, well, it does not really transfer any heat out of the system


You are setting up a situation that should never happen.  Lets say the freezer temp is 1 degree over freezing, it is way too warm.  Lets say ambient is...I hate using F for this because in engineering work you just don't use F ever, but it is a cold room temp of 40F.  The thermostat turns on the compressor and the coolant chills one side a certain number of degrees colder than the hot side.  You cool down the hot side to get the result you want on the cold side.  A single stage system should produce a 40 C differential in final temperature with no problem.  (If you want to create a -40 c/f environment in an 20C/70F ambient, you will have a dual stage system where one cools the refrigerant of the other, as is done inside an environmental chamber)    But this garage is not extreme at all.  This is not going to result in a refrigerant limitation, and the hot side of the system will absolutely definitely be hotter than room ambient because it started at ambient.  That is not what the issue is with this refrigerator.

Important point in figuring out this problem:  This guy's "$50 part" could not in any way constitute a fundamental change such as refrigerant type, therefor that is not the problem.

It has to be some kind of thermostat issue.  The article contains nonsense.  Fist they say it is because of this being a newer high-efficiency model.  But then it morphs into "well for the cost of a service call, $150, and a $50 part" blah blah blah....magically, that isn't true any more.  Now, did this repair lower the efficiency of the refrigerator?  If so, then they didn't fix the refrigerator.  Kind of like a VW - can't just tweak one spec because then the performance they sold the product to you on is a lousy bill of goods.  This has got to be something fairly petty like a thermostat issue and on this particular model.

Unless, there is a better explanation that is plausible?
 
2017-03-17 09:39:07 AM  
this it don't work surprise happens to motorhome/rv/travel trailer noobs. the frig has to be reasonably level [norcold brand says 3 degrees side to side and 6 degrees front to back]. so the owner parks it in their driveway and runs the frig on electric and surprise surprise their not level driveway screws the pooch.
 
2017-03-17 09:43:05 AM  

Aulus: When I was growing up, we had my maternal grandparent's mid 1940s Kenmore refrigerator as our only refrigerator until I was in high school. It had a freezer just barely bigger than the size of two six packs of beer.

It ran like a champ at least until we moved across country in 1970. Dad jujst could not see dragging it from Florida to Michigan, so he gave it to a neighbor. I would not be surprised if it were still running.

OTOH, in 1978, when my ex and I bought our first refrigerator for our first house when we were married, we bought a Kenmore. One week later, the handle to the main door came off. The repair guy sent out under warrentee told us that it was palatic and the glue used to put it on actually ate away at the plastic, causing this. Wonderful.


My wife and I bought a brand-new Kenmore refrigerator when we moved into our newly-built house in 1998.  It still works perfectly, 19 years later.
 
2017-03-17 09:44:05 AM  

dittybopper: Aulus: When I was growing up, we had my maternal grandparent's mid 1940s Kenmore refrigerator as our only refrigerator until I was in high school. It had a freezer just barely bigger than the size of two six packs of beer.

It ran like a champ at least until we moved across country in 1970. Dad jujst could not see dragging it from Florida to Michigan, so he gave it to a neighbor. I would not be surprised if it were still running.

OTOH, in 1978, when my ex and I bought our first refrigerator for our first house when we were married, we bought a Kenmore. One week later, the handle to the main door came off. The repair guy sent out under warrentee told us that it was palatic and the glue used to put it on actually ate away at the plastic, causing this. Wonderful.

My wife and I bought a brand-new Kenmore refrigerator when we moved into our newly-built house in 1998.  It still works perfectly, 19 years later.


It just occurred to me that your experience is just one more data point about how bad the 1970's sucked.
 
2017-03-17 09:46:06 AM  

Big_Fat_Liar: wingnut396: If the heat your cooling system is trying to transfer to the outside air is cooler than the outside air, well, it does not really transfer any heat out of the system

You are setting up a situation that should never happen.  Lets say the freezer temp is 1 degree over freezing, it is way too warm.  Lets say ambient is...I hate using F for this because in engineering work you just don't use F ever, but it is a cold room temp of 40F.  The thermostat turns on the compressor and the coolant chills one side a certain number of degrees colder than the hot side.  You cool down the hot side to get the result you want on the cold side.  A single stage system should produce a 40 C differential in final temperature with no problem.  (If you want to create a -40 c/f environment in an 20C/70F ambient, you will have a dual stage system where one cools the refrigerant of the other, as is done inside an environmental chamber)    But this garage is not extreme at all.  This is not going to result in a refrigerant limitation, and the hot side of the system will absolutely definitely be hotter than room ambient because it started at ambient.  That is not what the issue is with this refrigerator.

Important point in figuring out this problem:  This guy's "$50 part" could not in any way constitute a fundamental change such as refrigerant type, therefor that is not the problem.

It has to be some kind of thermostat issue.  The article contains nonsense.  Fist they say it is because of this being a newer high-efficiency model.  But then it morphs into "well for the cost of a service call, $150, and a $50 part" blah blah blah....magically, that isn't true any more.  Now, did this repair lower the efficiency of the refrigerator?  If so, then they didn't fix the refrigerator.  Kind of like a VW - can't just tweak one spec because then the performance they sold the product to you on is a lousy bill of goods.  This has got to be something fairly petty like a thermostat issue and on ...


Yeah, not sure of the $50 part fix either.  I could see high efficiency partly meaning a control system that is tuned for a finer ambient temperature range.

But in any case, a hot and very humid environment will cause refrigeration systems to not work as well.  I know when its 100+ F and over 80% humidity, our house will just not cool down as much as she wants, no matter what she believes *should* happen.  Just nowhere for the heat to go, or at least go quickly.
 
2017-03-17 09:56:30 AM  

puffy999: fark new appliances.


There are plusses and minuses to most things.

For instance, new appliances tend to be vastly more efficient than older ones, and packer with features no one even considered 50 years ago. They also cost a fraction of what they used to cost, in inflation adjusted dollars.

I have an old Westinghouse fridge from the 50's. It is a great beer fridge for my bar, but it is probably 1/2 the capacity or less than my fridge in the kitchen, uses more energy, and the freezer bay turns into a solid block of ice roughly 3 picoseconds after I defrost it and plug it back in. It's cute, and built like a tank, but it also was almost certainly much more expensive in 2017 dollars too than our modern fridge.
 
2017-03-17 10:00:37 AM  

feckingmorons: As to this specific user, if you can't see the manual before you buy a reasonable person standard applies and you can expect the warranty to cover the use in a garage if you've previously used a refrigerator of the same type (not a natural gas refrigerator) in the same place.

You can't add absurd warranty terms without disclosing them, so says the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.


Seems like a great opportunity for a retailer to label "garage safe" models on their showroom..... and add an extra $30 or something to the pricetag.
 
2017-03-17 10:27:10 AM  

Weidbrewer: Mycroft_Holmes_IV: So next important question...Are there new refrigerators available that ARE designed to work in temp extremes?

Yeah, I'd be curious to know as well...my garage fridge is probably not long for this world, and I'd like to start pricing replacements.


As others here said, a fridge only model (meaning no freezer or at least "don't care if the stuff in there defrosts" freezer) will probably work fine in most garages unless you are in the Yukon or Death Valley.  I wouldn't store like milk or other highly temperature dependent stuff...but beer cans would be fine.

As for a freezer, I bought a $200 Magic Chef chest freezer at home depot for my garage a few years ago.  Never had a problem and it'd routinely get over 100 in there or colder than 20 degrees.  Manual had the same warnings but what I assume happened is it cooled down only occasionally due to cold air tending to stay inside it and not leak out like in an upright model.
 
2017-03-17 10:39:56 AM  
Indeed, the Use and Care Manual states that this fridge should be in placed only in a room that is between 55 degrees and 110 degrees, and should not be near a heat source, in a very hot garage (such as in Florida), or a very cold garage (such as in a northern state's winter).

Hey doofus, a garage in Florida won't get to 110 degrees. A garage in Phoenix probably won't get to 110 degrees, a place where it regularly gets up to 115 and above. Put a little more effort into your writing there, chuckles.
 
2017-03-17 10:54:18 AM  
And then they give an example of the shiat you're in for if you buy something from Sears.
 
2017-03-17 11:27:31 AM  
FTFA: Schubert wonders how anyone would ever known this when buying it, since the salesman never gave him a heads up. (Schubert says the repairman explained that if you turn to page 9 of the Kenmore manual, you will  find out that the refrigerator should not be set up in a very cold or very hot location.)

Well, I don't know, maybe read the literature that comes with things?
At least flip through it?
Take some farking initiative and stop waiting for you hand to be held every step of the way.
 
2017-03-17 11:40:38 AM  

Weidbrewer: Mycroft_Holmes_IV: So next important question...Are there new refrigerators available that ARE designed to work in temp extremes?

Yeah, I'd be curious to know as well...my garage fridge is probably not long for this world, and I'd like to start pricing replacements.


There are plenty of places to buy older model refrigerators. Check Craigslist.
 
2017-03-17 11:47:16 AM  

Mikey1969: Indeed, the Use and Care Manual states that this fridge should be in placed only in a room that is between 55 degrees and 110 degrees, and should not be near a heat source, in a very hot garage (such as in Florida), or a very cold garage (such as in a northern state's winter).

Hey doofus, a garage in Florida won't get to 110 degrees. A garage in Phoenix probably won't get to 110 degrees, a place where it regularly gets up to 115 and above. Put a little more effort into your writing there, chuckles.


Hey Mikey, since you clearly don't live in a place that's hot, sunny and humid, perhaps you should check on that.    Here on the south side of Houston, with a dark brown metal garage door facing the sun and outside temps and humidity both above 95, we'll see garage temperatures at 120+ every summer.
 
2017-03-17 11:51:02 AM  

jgk3: Mikey1969: Indeed, the Use and Care Manual states that this fridge should be in placed only in a room that is between 55 degrees and 110 degrees, and should not be near a heat source, in a very hot garage (such as in Florida), or a very cold garage (such as in a northern state's winter).

Hey doofus, a garage in Florida won't get to 110 degrees. A garage in Phoenix probably won't get to 110 degrees, a place where it regularly gets up to 115 and above. Put a little more effort into your writing there, chuckles.

Hey Mikey, since you clearly don't live in a place that's hot, sunny and humid, perhaps you should check on that.    Here on the south side of Houston, with a dark brown metal garage door facing the sun and outside temps and humidity both above 95, we'll see garage temperatures at 120+ every summer.


Same in Dallas
 
2017-03-17 11:56:05 AM  

jgk3: Mikey1969: Indeed, the Use and Care Manual states that this fridge should be in placed only in a room that is between 55 degrees and 110 degrees, and should not be near a heat source, in a very hot garage (such as in Florida), or a very cold garage (such as in a northern state's winter).

Hey doofus, a garage in Florida won't get to 110 degrees. A garage in Phoenix probably won't get to 110 degrees, a place where it regularly gets up to 115 and above. Put a little more effort into your writing there, chuckles.

Hey Mikey, since you clearly don't live in a place that's hot, sunny and humid, perhaps you should check on that.    Here on the south side of Houston, with a dark brown metal garage door facing the sun and outside temps and humidity both above 95, we'll see garage temperatures at 120+ every summer.


in central Arkansas

/FTFM
//Arkansas...Texas...we're the same between June and September
(((third slashies warped from the summer heat
 
2017-03-17 11:57:20 AM  

jgk3


Here on the south side of Houston, with a dark brown metal garage door facing the sun and outside temps and humidity both above 95, we'll see garage temperatures at 120+ every summer.


If you're dumb enough to have a dark brown metal garage door in Texas, yes, the garage will get warm.

Try to be smarter than that.
 
2017-03-17 12:12:21 PM  

mrsleep: FTFA: Schubert wonders how anyone would ever known this when buying it, since the salesman never gave him a heads up. (Schubert says the repairman explained that if you turn to page 9 of the Kenmore manual, you will  find out that the refrigerator should not be set up in a very cold or very hot location.)

Well, I don't know, maybe read the literature that comes with things?
At least flip through it?
Take some farking initiative and stop waiting for you hand to be held every step of the way.


You can't read what you don't have. The manuals aren't in the display models on the showroom floor.
 
2017-03-17 12:24:20 PM  

puffy999: fark new appliances.


Well, yeah.   It's gross using used vibrators and real dolls.

Technically vibrators and real dolls are appliances.
 
2017-03-17 12:28:28 PM  

stevetherobot: foo monkey: dFunk: Ok nerds, 'splain to me why this is happening.

The fridge has to maintain a relatively constant temperature around 40F. If the garage is too hot, it can't do this. If the garage is too cold, it can't do this.

Why were older fridges able to do this?


It's more that the new ones can't.  Efficiency and pollution.  Don't worry.  Trump's going to make refrigerators great again.
www.logoeps.com
 
2017-03-17 12:31:47 PM  

wingnut396: Big_Fat_Liar: wingnut396: If the heat your cooling system is trying to transfer to the outside air is cooler than the outside air, well, it does not really transfer any heat out of the system

You are setting up a situation that should never happen.  Lets say the freezer temp is 1 degree over freezing, it is way too warm.  Lets say ambient is...I hate using F for this because in engineering work you just don't use F ever, but it is a cold room temp of 40F.  The thermostat turns on the compressor and the coolant chills one side a certain number of degrees colder than the hot side.  You cool down the hot side to get the result you want on the cold side.  A single stage system should produce a 40 C differential in final temperature with no problem.  (If you want to create a -40 c/f environment in an 20C/70F ambient, you will have a dual stage system where one cools the refrigerant of the other, as is done inside an environmental chamber)    But this garage is not extreme at all.  This is not going to result in a refrigerant limitation, and the hot side of the system will absolutely definitely be hotter than room ambient because it started at ambient.  That is not what the issue is with this refrigerator.

Important point in figuring out this problem:  This guy's "$50 part" could not in any way constitute a fundamental change such as refrigerant type, therefor that is not the problem.

It has to be some kind of thermostat issue.  The article contains nonsense.  Fist they say it is because of this being a newer high-efficiency model.  But then it morphs into "well for the cost of a service call, $150, and a $50 part" blah blah blah....magically, that isn't true any more.  Now, did this repair lower the efficiency of the refrigerator?  If so, then they didn't fix the refrigerator.  Kind of like a VW - can't just tweak one spec because then the performance they sold the product to you on is a lousy bill of goods.  This has got to be something fairly petty like a thermostat ...


I have a frigidaire with this issue. Salesman told me upfront 2 years ago that most new refrigerators are made this way.  Essentially if the thermostat detects that the ambient temperature is too cool it won't run the refrigerator.  The trick is, and frigidaire sells the part, is to install a $5.99 warmer adjacent the thermostat control unit, that plugs into the power supply to the refrigerator light that tricks it to always thinking it's in an 80F room.  Then it runs as it's supposed to.
 
2017-03-17 12:40:55 PM  

Mikey1969: garage in Phoenix probably won't get to 110 degrees, a place where it regularly gets up to 115 and above.


It'll depend pretty heavily on which way your garage faces-- ours used to heat up to about 125F in Phoenix, which was routinely above ambient.  It's a box that traps heat.  With a water heater and two warm engine blocks in it, a metal door that faces the sun most of the day, and windows that let the sunlight in but trap the heat.  Insulating the garage door and putting low-transmission window film on the windows brought it back down closer to ambient by slowing the rate at which it could take on heat from insolation, but it'll always be warmer than ambient because it's got heat sources inside it as well as outside it, and because it traps energy the same way a car parked in the sun does.

The attic, though... that sees 160F in the summer.  I had to buy one of those oven-calibration thermometers to find that out, because the weather thermometer I had been using in the garage maxed out well before that.
 
2017-03-17 12:42:42 PM  

Big_Fat_Liar: wingnut396: If the heat your cooling system is trying to transfer to the outside air is cooler than the outside air, well, it does not really transfer any heat out of the system

You are setting up a situation that should never happen.  Lets say the freezer temp is 1 degree over freezing, it is way too warm.  Lets say ambient is...I hate using F for this because in engineering work you just don't use F ever, but it is a cold room temp of 40F.  The thermostat turns on the compressor and the coolant chills one side a certain number of degrees colder than the hot side.  You cool down the hot side to get the result you want on the cold side.  A single stage system should produce a 40 C differential in final temperature with no problem.  (If you want to create a -40 c/f environment in an 20C/70F ambient, you will have a dual stage system where one cools the refrigerant of the other, as is done inside an environmental chamber)    But this garage is not extreme at all.  This is not going to result in a refrigerant limitation, and the hot side of the system will absolutely definitely be hotter than room ambient because it started at ambient.  That is not what the issue is with this refrigerator.

Important point in figuring out this problem:  This guy's "$50 part" could not in any way constitute a fundamental change such as refrigerant type, therefor that is not the problem.

It has to be some kind of thermostat issue.  The article contains nonsense.  Fist they say it is because of this being a newer high-efficiency model.  But then it morphs into "well for the cost of a service call, $150, and a $50 part" blah blah blah....magically, that isn't true any more.  Now, did this repair lower the efficiency of the refrigerator?  If so, then they didn't fix the refrigerator.  Kind of like a VW - can't just tweak one spec because then the performance they sold the product to you on is a lousy bill of goods.  This has got to be something fairly petty like a thermostat issue and on this particular model.

Unless, there is a better explanation that is plausible?


Yes.

The fridge controller could have various settings that limit the time length the compressor is allowed to run. The compressor could be overheating and turning off to prevent damage.

Also single-stage freezers will easily get you to -40 in a 70 environment. -40 freezers are common in science and industry and are usually single stage. -85c is about the limit of dual stage and -120 is about the limit of triple stage.
 
2017-03-17 12:43:43 PM  

jgk3: Mikey1969: Indeed, the Use and Care Manual states that this fridge should be in placed only in a room that is between 55 degrees and 110 degrees, and should not be near a heat source, in a very hot garage (such as in Florida), or a very cold garage (such as in a northern state's winter).

Hey doofus, a garage in Florida won't get to 110 degrees. A garage in Phoenix probably won't get to 110 degrees, a place where it regularly gets up to 115 and above. Put a little more effort into your writing there, chuckles.

Hey Mikey, since you clearly don't live in a place that's hot, sunny and humid, perhaps you should check on that.    Here on the south side of Houston, with a dark brown metal garage door facing the sun and outside temps and humidity both above 95, we'll see garage temperatures at 120+ every summer.


I spent 22 years in Arizona. Never had a garage that was that high of a temperature. Maybe you need to quit calling your shed a "garage".
 
2017-03-17 12:44:33 PM  

raygundan: Mikey1969: garage in Phoenix probably won't get to 110 degrees, a place where it regularly gets up to 115 and above.

It'll depend pretty heavily on which way your garage faces-- ours used to heat up to about 125F in Phoenix, which was routinely above ambient.  It's a box that traps heat.  With a water heater and two warm engine blocks in it, a metal door that faces the sun most of the day, and windows that let the sunlight in but trap the heat.  Insulating the garage door and putting low-transmission window film on the windows brought it back down closer to ambient by slowing the rate at which it could take on heat from insolation, but it'll always be warmer than ambient because it's got heat sources inside it as well as outside it, and because it traps energy the same way a car parked in the sun does.

The attic, though... that sees 160F in the summer.  I had to buy one of those oven-calibration thermometers to find that out, because the weather thermometer I had been using in the garage maxed out well before that.


Oh, mine got hot, but never that hot. The attic, OTOH, that WILL get hot like that. You need attic vents for sure.
 
2017-03-17 12:51:49 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: jgk3

Here on the south side of Houston, with a dark brown metal garage door facing the sun and outside temps and humidity both above 95, we'll see garage temperatures at 120+ every summer.


If you're dumb enough to have a dark brown metal garage door in Texas, yes, the garage will get warm.

Try to be smarter than that.


You could paint the garage door titanium white and it will still get warm.  A little less warm, but still very, very warm.  Insulating the door will help a bit, too.  As will covering or putting low-e film on any windows.  And adding vents, whether they're passive or have fans.  But if Texas is anything like Arizona, this is all a difference of degrees (no pun intended)-- it will still be godawful hot in the garage when you're done with every modification you can think of.  Just slightly less godawful hot than before.  Nothing short of actually adding an air conditioner to the garage will make it anything less than godawful hot-- because it's godawful hot outside, and it will always be slightly warmer than outside in the garage.

A friend found an interesting halfway measure to steal back a few more degrees without resorting to actual AC-- the heat-pump water heater that GE makes works just like an air conditioner or refrigerator.  It pumps heat out of the ambient environment into the water in the tank.
 
2017-03-17 12:55:30 PM  
I was looking at getting another fridge for the garage so this is pretty handy information.  Seems like FFTR1821 from Frigidaire is "garage ready" so if you get that one and it fails it's hard for them to complain about warranty work.
 
2017-03-17 12:57:45 PM  

Mikey1969: I spent 22 years in Arizona. Never had a garage that was that high of a temperature. Maybe you need to quit calling your shed a "garage".


Do share your secrets.  Did you air condition it?  I mean... we see ambient temps of 122F now and then, so of course our garage has seen 122F.  Your garage could have no walls, and it would have seen 122F here.  Or maybe you were in northern Arizona?
 
2017-03-17 01:08:18 PM  

raygundan: Mikey1969: I spent 22 years in Arizona. Never had a garage that was that high of a temperature. Maybe you need to quit calling your shed a "garage".

Do share your secrets.  Did you air condition it?  I mean... we see ambient temps of 122F now and then, so of course our garage has seen 122F.  Your garage could have no walls, and it would have seen 122F here.  Or maybe you were in northern Arizona?


Is your garage not insulated at all?  How long are your doors open in that heat?
 
2017-03-17 01:13:34 PM  

raygundan


You could paint the garage door titanium white and it will still get warm. A little less warm, but still very, very warm. Insulating the door will help a bit, too. As will covering or putting low-e film on any windows. And adding vents, whether they're passive or have fans. But if Texas is anything like Arizona, this is all a difference of degrees (no pun intended)-- it will still be godawful hot in the garage when you're done with every modification you can think of. Just slightly less godawful hot than before.


That's all true, of course, but there is an enormous difference between taking measures to reduce the amount of heat in the garage and doing something to make it measurably worse (like having a metal door painted a dark color).

I had extended family in Arizona and their garage was tolerable even in July. The house was pale tan and the garage doors were white. I don't recall which direction the doors faced.


A friend found an interesting halfway measure to steal back a few more degrees without resorting to actual AC-- the heat-pump water heater that GE makes works just like an air conditioner or refrigerator. It pumps heat out of the ambient environment into the water in the tank.


That is interesting; I did not know such a thing existed. Thanks!
 
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