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(NYPost)   Apparently, because of his big bushy beard, David Letterman keeps getting mistaken for a rabbi. Oy   ( nypost.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, David Letterman, Sire Records co-founder, character Artie Fufkin, Late Show with David Letterman, Paul Shaffer, Late Night with David Letterman, late-night TV, Letterman's interviews  
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932 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 16 Mar 2017 at 10:20 PM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



13 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2017-03-16 04:56:05 PM  
Better than being mistaken for a Duck Dynasty douche.
 
2017-03-16 10:56:50 PM  

big bushy beard


Sergeant Popwell?!?


img.fark.net
 
2017-03-16 11:17:08 PM  
Hey David, 1984 called.  Said you were an overrated hack back then too.

Cher saw right through you.
 
2017-03-16 11:20:54 PM  
Big whoop. I get mistaken for a Giantsbane regularly and you don't hear me crying about it.

//never, never will. either.
 
2017-03-16 11:25:32 PM  
s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com
 
2017-03-17 12:13:45 AM  

Englebert Slaptyback: big bushy beard


Sergeant Popwell?!?


[img.fark.net image 600x452]


My first thought as well, any time someone mentions a big or bushy beard.
 
2017-03-17 03:33:44 AM  
Article says he was attending a Jewish event at the time, so it's an understandable mistake. My understanding is that the rabbis tend to have bushy beards even if the rest of the men in the congregation don't.
 
2017-03-17 08:29:51 AM  
Jeezus - how high was Madonna during that interview?

Yes.
 
2017-03-17 10:49:04 AM  

cyberspacedout: Article says he was attending a Jewish event at the time, so it's an understandable mistake. My understanding is that the rabbis tend to have bushy beards even if the rest of the men in the congregation don't.


Leviticus has some oddly specific rules for how you keep your hair and beard.

It's one of those parts of the Bible we pretend don't count, because reasons.
 
2017-03-17 11:18:19 AM  

BullBearMS: cyberspacedout: Article says he was attending a Jewish event at the time, so it's an understandable mistake. My understanding is that the rabbis tend to have bushy beards even if the rest of the men in the congregation don't.

Leviticus has some oddly specific rules for how you keep your hair and beard.

It's one of those parts of the Bible we pretend don't count, because reasons.


I've been reading a history of the Mid East and the spread of various religions from around 1000BC to 600AD. Basically what got believed in a certain region depended upon who was in power and how they wanted the religion to be presented. With Christianity, there were lots of competing varieties. (And still are.) Whether you believed X or Y or Z or [huge series of possibilities] did not depend upon what the truth was or what was logical or necessary. It depended -- usually but not always -- on whim and who was in power.

People talk about the Council of Nicaea (for example) as if it set down in stone once and forever what Christianity was. But there were lots of councils. It was almost like the Olympics there for awhile.
 
2017-03-17 11:33:17 AM  

yakmans_dad: BullBearMS: cyberspacedout: Article says he was attending a Jewish event at the time, so it's an understandable mistake. My understanding is that the rabbis tend to have bushy beards even if the rest of the men in the congregation don't.

Leviticus has some oddly specific rules for how you keep your hair and beard.

It's one of those parts of the Bible we pretend don't count, because reasons.

I've been reading a history of the Mid East and the spread of various religions from around 1000BC to 600AD. Basically what got believed in a certain region depended upon who was in power and how they wanted the religion to be presented. With Christianity, there were lots of competing varieties. (And still are.) Whether you believed X or Y or Z or [huge series of possibilities] did not depend upon what the truth was or what was logical or necessary. It depended -- usually but not always -- on whim and who was in power.

People talk about the Council of Nicaea (for example) as if it set down in stone once and forever what Christianity was. But there were lots of councils. It was almost like the Olympics there for awhile.


There's nothing more hysterical to me than people who insist that the set of rules adopted by their particular religious sect were handed down to them from on high, unchanging.

However, it's widely accepted that the reason for that particular rule of the bible is that the Jewish people happened to live near a group with a different religion who were required by their religion to shave the side of their head.

Like many laws in the Torah, the verse does not spell out the exact reason for this prohibition. Nevertheless, some commentaries explain that since this mitzvah is placed among other prohibitions related to idolatry, and since many idol-worshipers used to cut off the hair on the sides of their heads while leaving the hair on top to grow, we are required to maintain a physical appearance that distinguishes us from idol-worshipers.

So, that particular rule goes right back to what you were saying.
 
2017-03-17 02:07:33 PM  
Why is this late-night host different from all other late-night hosts?
 
2017-03-17 02:42:53 PM  

carrion_luggage: Why is this late-night host different from all other late-night hosts?


Soon he will be more powerful than you can possibly imagine.

img.fark.net
 
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