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(Business Insider)   San Francisco real estate developer wants to house the homeless in towers of stackable "micro-units." Which would make them live just like everyone else in San Francisco   ( businessinsider.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Real estate, Panoramic Interests, Homelessness, Melia Robinson/Business Insider, Containerization, Berkeley City Council, Oakland, California, private bathrooms  
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531 clicks; posted to Business » on 16 Mar 2017 at 2:20 PM (30 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



36 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-03-16 09:07:50 AM  
Complete with fresh-lock seal to keep in the homeless from going stale.  Top rack dishwasher safe.
 
2017-03-16 09:47:32 AM  
High-rise, high-density, low-income, subsidized housing?  What a new idea!  But please don't tell me that they're going to budget only enough to build but not maintain them, because that's my original idea and they can't have it!
 
2017-03-16 10:09:40 AM  

factoryconnection: High-rise, high-density, low-income, subsidized housing?  What a new idea!  But please don't tell me that they're going to budget only enough to build but not maintain them, because that's my original idea and they can't have it!


Aaaand we're done here.
 
2017-03-16 10:26:25 AM  
Towers Of Micro-Units was the name of my R&B-Funk brass-heavy Owsley LSD tribute lab.
 
2017-03-16 11:06:40 AM  

brap: Towers Of Micro-Units was the name of my R&B-Funk brass-heavy Owsley LSD tribute lab.


This meme is more done to death than Trump's steak dinner but that doesn't mean you didn't strike gold with this, Weekend at Bernies-style.
 
2017-03-16 11:38:01 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: factoryconnection: High-rise, high-density, low-income, subsidized housing?  What a new idea!  But please don't tell me that they're going to budget only enough to build but not maintain them, because that's my original idea and they can't have it!

Aaaand we're done here.


But they're portable so once you get the homeless inside you can ship them to Nebraska or Kansas.
 
2017-03-16 01:12:58 PM  
Better get practiced up on your 80's video games.  Might want to start with Joust

img.fark.net
 
2017-03-16 02:36:56 PM  

factoryconnection: High-rise, high-density, low-income, subsidized housing?  What a new idea!  But please don't tell me that they're going to budget only enough to build but not maintain them, because that's my original idea and they can't have it!


It's a great project.  To provide housing.  They could call it a "housing project."  People will like that.
 
2017-03-16 02:40:58 PM  
Obvious where the idea came from...
img.fark.net
 
2017-03-16 02:54:15 PM  
Japan already does something similar.
 
2017-03-16 02:54:27 PM  
Arcology's time has come !
 
2017-03-16 02:57:43 PM  
Apparently they're going to save money by not having toilets - just a communal long drop in the corner which will service the whole block from top to bottom.

It's more eco-friendly bc it will just compost away at the bottom.
 
2017-03-16 03:11:06 PM  

Raoul Eaton: factoryconnection: High-rise, high-density, low-income, subsidized housing?  What a new idea!  But please don't tell me that they're going to budget only enough to build but not maintain them, because that's my original idea and they can't have it!

It's a great project.  To provide housing.  They could call it a "housing project."  People will like that.


Eh, historically, most housing projects weren't built for the homeless, but for lower-income families with children. Or at least they started out as such - some may have loosened admission standards since their inception.
 
2017-03-16 03:24:40 PM  
These shipping container units in Chengdu, China rent for about $1 a day:

img.fark.net
 
2017-03-16 04:16:40 PM  
Yeah, let's put all the crazy drug addicts together in tiny boxes. That should work out just fine.

/what planet are these people from?
 
2017-03-16 04:36:31 PM  
The biggest problem is that, unless you're talking about mobile home construction, pre-fab housing isn't cheaper than industry standard construction techniques. In fact, most tall & modular built buildings end up with huge cost overruns along with lawsuits and ongoing maintenance problems. How many times do people need to make this mistake?

http://www.treehugger.com/modular-design/norman-oder-worlds-tallest-m​o​dular-building-and-phantom-20-percent-savings.html

Also, why is this article in the "Tech Insider" section? It may be a story from San Francisco, but there's nothing particularly techy about standard pre-fab construction and urban planning.
 
2017-03-16 05:10:08 PM  

Raoul Eaton: factoryconnection: High-rise, high-density, low-income, subsidized housing?  What a new idea!  But please don't tell me that they're going to budget only enough to build but not maintain them, because that's my original idea and they can't have it!

It's a great project.  To provide housing.  They could call it a "housing project."  People will like that.


and with eight sections each!
 
2017-03-16 05:44:08 PM  
Hope this isn't the dev who built Millennium Tower.
Or Newmanium Tower.
 
2017-03-16 05:54:07 PM  

MrSteve007: The biggest problem is that, unless you're talking about mobile home construction, pre-fab housing isn't cheaper than industry standard construction techniques. In fact, most tall & modular built buildings end up with huge cost overruns along with lawsuits and ongoing maintenance problems. How many times do people need to make this mistake?

http://www.treehugger.com/modular-design/norman-oder-worlds-tallest-mo​dular-building-and-phantom-20-percent-savings.html

Also, why is this article in the "Tech Insider" section? It may be a story from San Francisco, but there's nothing particularly techy about standard pre-fab construction and urban planning.


Sounds like they went too complex and had a whole slew of other issues. 32 types of modules? 32 stories tall when it looks like 10-18 is the sweet spot? And then a few lawsuits and delays, and what sounds like poor design overall.

Seems like they would have done better with a LOT types and under half the height.

But then again I'm not exactly "OMG WE MUST FIND A BETTER WAY TO BUILD MODULAR!", when I think modular, I think pre-fab buildings, the shell - walls, roof, floor, stairs - should be able to be assembled quickly.

Kinda like Timberline Geodesic stuff - they literally just sell the shell.

For commercial I'd go with leaving the spaces being divided by heavy airwalls. For residential? Put something so that you can "easily" move the walls around, so if people want a tiny bedroom but a huge bathroom, they can. But that's just me, and I don't have the, well, anything, to go into proper arcology design.
 
2017-03-16 07:26:10 PM  
I remember reading some sci-fi story about this.  But it was more of 99% of the populace lived in the no-frills "micro-units".
 
2017-03-16 07:27:01 PM  

wax_on: Yeah, let's put all the crazy drug addicts together in tiny boxes. That should work out just fine.

/what planet are these people from?


Are they all made out of ticky-tacky? Do they all look just the same?
 
2017-03-16 07:54:11 PM  
Golem City, here we come!
 
2017-03-16 08:51:39 PM  

Summercat: Timberline Geodesic


Those are rad.
 
2017-03-16 08:57:57 PM  
Japanese capsule hotels?
 
2017-03-16 09:30:58 PM  

adder1: Obvious where the idea came from...
[img.fark.net image 800x343]


Snowcrash movie?
 
2017-03-16 09:45:03 PM  

Target Builder: adder1: Obvious where the idea came from...
[img.fark.net image 800x343]

Snowcrash movie?


The product placement movie I, Robot. Want some retro sneakers?
 
2017-03-16 10:21:46 PM  
Rich conservatives are so greedy they want to let you die so they can have it all.

Rich progressives have just enough of a conscience that they want to keep us barely alive in boxes so they can sleep at night after a full day of having nearly everything.

We need to kill these people soon before it's too late.
 
2017-03-16 11:20:53 PM  

Cold soup: Rich conservatives are so greedy they want to let you die so they can have it all.

Rich progressives have just enough of a conscience that they want to keep us barely alive in boxes so they can sleep at night after a full day of having nearly everything.

We need to kill these people soon before it's too late.


Good thinking.
Maybe try taxing them at a reasonable level first, to even out the outrages at either end of the spectrum.
 
2017-03-16 11:31:40 PM  

Biggs Farklighter: Complete with fresh-lock seal to keep in the homeless from going stale.  Top rack dishwasher safe.


That put into my head an episode of Erie Indianna...
 
2017-03-16 11:32:45 PM  
Funny that you think we'll ever get enough uncompromised pols elected at once to enact higher pre-Regan tax rates on the wealthy ever again.
 
2017-03-16 11:48:24 PM  
Or you could stop giving the homeless free stuff and they'll go somewhere else.
 
2017-03-16 11:49:11 PM  

mjjt: Apparently they're going to save money by not having toilets - just a communal long drop in the corner which will service the whole block from top to bottom.

It's more eco-friendly bc it will just compost away at the bottom.


Picture of toilet in TFA.
 
2017-03-17 12:41:39 AM  
CSB:  Walking with my mom and new boyfriend past People's Park:  "Hey lady, you got a tampon?  I'm bleeding over here!"
/Short of demolishing a public park or those crap-tastic apartment buildings with the questionable balconies, not sure where you'll find the space.  
//A housing project that's 100% chronically homeless- sounds sustainable
///threes
 
2017-03-17 01:08:27 AM  
I'm an architect who works with developers on high rise apartment buildings.

When you build new, it doesn't make any sense to house subsidized tenants. Mortgages must be paid. But putting poor people in buildings that are nearly or fully paid off, that makes sense. And you can spread them around. Concentrating poor people is proven to be a bad idea (I also work on government owned subsidized housing projects).
 
2017-03-17 07:48:51 PM  
Good idea. Skip shipping containers. Modding them to work is more hassle than initially anticipated. Better, get actual living quarters that are made modular: cruise line ships have the living quarters built modularly. They have all the HVAC, electrical and plumbing systems designed into the modules. They can withstand all the tossing a turning that occurs in very rough seas, so like 2 hours of 9.0 on the Richter scale. They're also water proof (or built to handle water ingress) so flooding and hurricane are already dealt with.

Then, get rid of the complex kitchen in these units. Offer a simple convection/microwave oven to warm up something or heat up a cup of tea. All dining will occur in a main dining room, much like on a cruise ship. That makes it easier to maintain and clean a small unit, because otherwise, oil and other volatile elements coat the walls and ceilings and make them smell bad. Have per-user sized compartments for each person's personal food items. Openable only with nearby presence of the proper smartphone or similar device.

Minimize the amount of storage space. Most people don't need most of the shiat they carry around, especially homeless people with their shopping cart full of useless junk. All information and data are in the cloud. All reading, listening and watching material are digital and stored in the cloud or in one's personal digital devices. Reduce the amount of clothing to reality: 3 pairs of pants, 4 tops, 2 shoes, socks, underwear, and simple accessories. All that can go into a fairly small closet/armoire. Then, it's hygiene: shower, toilet. Move the sink into the shower area to reduce space. Brush your teeth, shave, whatever, in the shower (don't turn on the shower, of course). All cleaning products: soap, shampoo, toothpaste, mouthwash, etc. Will come out from the wall. For women (well, men, too, if they use make-up), small cosmetic kit stored near the bathroom.

Bed sheets are made with anti-microbial fabric. All washable material can be dumped into a hamper that shoots it to a common laundry facility. IDs on the fabrics (bar codes?) will tell them which unit to return the items.
 
2017-03-17 08:23:52 PM  

slantsix: I'm an architect who works with developers on high rise apartment buildings.

When you build new, it doesn't make any sense to house subsidized tenants. Mortgages must be paid. But putting poor people in buildings that are nearly or fully paid off, that makes sense. And you can spread them around. Concentrating poor people is proven to be a bad idea (I also work on government owned subsidized housing projects).


I agree. The economics, especially in very land-expensive cities like in the Bay Area, says to build for the wealthiest people. When those who are living in older buildings with fewer amenities see that there's a much better place with much greater amenities, they'll accept a higher rent/mortgage for the benefits. Then, those older buildings will be freed up, and with supply increasing, the rent prices will drop and less wealthy people can move into those buildings, and so on. Trickle down real estate economics, as long as you don't allow people to buy a place and keep it vacant. (Currently, there are over 40,000 unoccupied units in San Francisco. If they were taxed or somehow discouraged from being kept unoccupied, the rental prices will drop by about $500/month.)
 
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