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(Slashdot)   And then, the robot murders began   ( yro.slashdot.org) divider line
    More: Scary, robot, Robotics, industrial robot, robot safety problem, rogue humanoid robot, huge robot, Robot revolution, William Holbrook  
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2054 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Mar 2017 at 5:20 AM (44 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-03-16 03:19:00 AM  
KIller Robots from Venus
Youtube twJFPjrUygg
 
2017-03-16 03:45:09 AM  
Is the robot going to eat my face, or just kill me?
 
2017-03-16 05:36:00 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-03-16 05:47:45 AM  
One of the things that would be important in this case is the safety procedures of the manufacturing plant. Were there lockout/tagout procedures in place for maintenance and if so, did this person properly follow them.

Maintenance should never be done on a piece of equipment that has power going to it.
 
2017-03-16 06:11:19 AM  

Befuddled: One of the things that would be important in this case is the safety procedures of the manufacturing plant. Were there lockout/tagout procedures in place for maintenance and if so, did this person properly follow them.

Maintenance should never be done on a piece of equipment that has power going to it.


Totally agree. Unfortunately, we humans are a rather illogical bunch. Safety procedures say to take the rings off, but people arc-weld them on capacitor banks, or get them caught in machinery often enough that we keep telling the same stories. The concept of lock out / tag out makes total logical sense, yet technicians (but more commonly engineers like myself) will explicitly say something like "I'll be quick, no need this time, I know what I'm doing". And accidents happen, and we get another safety stand down briefing to cover what we clearly know but refuse to obey.

When possible, I try to make machines smart enough to recognize a human being human and take the responsible action even when confronted with an obviously irresponsible individual. Doesn't always work. An engineer unintentionally intent on getting hurt will find a way to fool the foolproof interlock (guilty myself, many times).
 
2017-03-16 06:20:21 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-03-16 07:12:45 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

img.fark.netView Full Size


Not to worry, Judson Ellis can handle the defense.

...As many times as it takes.
 
2017-03-16 08:06:09 AM  

Befuddled: One of the things that would be important in this case is the safety procedures of the manufacturing plant. Were there lockout/tagout procedures in place for maintenance and if so, did this person properly follow them.

Maintenance should never be done on a piece of equipment that has power going to it.


Thanks, Susan.
 
2017-03-16 09:29:03 AM  
Call Lije Bailey.
 
2017-03-16 09:51:09 AM  

roostercube: Befuddled: One of the things that would be important in this case is the safety procedures of the manufacturing plant. Were there lockout/tagout procedures in place for maintenance and if so, did this person properly follow them.

Maintenance should never be done on a piece of equipment that has power going to it.

Totally agree. Unfortunately, we humans are a rather illogical bunch. Safety procedures say to take the rings off, but people arc-weld them on capacitor banks, or get them caught in machinery often enough that we keep telling the same stories. The concept of lock out / tag out makes total logical sense, yet technicians (but more commonly engineers like myself) will explicitly say something like "I'll be quick, no need this time, I know what I'm doing". And accidents happen, and we get another safety stand down briefing to cover what we clearly know but refuse to obey.

When possible, I try to make machines smart enough to recognize a human being human and take the responsible action even when confronted with an obviously irresponsible individual. Doesn't always work. An engineer unintentionally intent on getting hurt will find a way to fool the foolproof interlock (guilty myself, many times).


You only have to smell 440V@150A going through human flesh once. I may be a code monkey, but I take our high voltage systems very seriously.
 
2017-03-16 10:06:16 AM  
the first woman to get hitched to a robot.
 
2017-03-16 10:10:51 AM  
Did the situation resemble this in any way?

i68.tinypic.comView Full Size
 
2017-03-16 10:32:59 AM  

Befuddled: One of the things that would be important in this case is the safety procedures of the manufacturing plant. Were there lockout/tagout procedures in place for maintenance and if so, did this person properly follow them.

Maintenance should never be done on a piece of equipment that has power going to it.


Interesting point from one of the sublinks in TFA:   "There are currently no specific workplace safety standards for the robotics industry, according to OSHA. As of 2014, the agency reported about 30 robotics-related deaths over a period of 30 years."

Can't have any job-killing regulations, now, can we?  :)
 
2017-03-16 10:35:47 AM  
"The machine loaded the hardware onto Holbrook's head."

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-03-16 11:03:07 AM  

edmo: "The machine loaded the hardware onto Holbrook's head."

[img.fark.net image 400x225]


That made my morning.
 
2017-03-16 12:31:51 PM  

edmo: "The machine loaded the hardware onto Holbrook's head."

[img.fark.net image 400x225]


I cant stop laughing.
 
2017-03-16 12:40:14 PM  
Might have a case, but most likely incorrect lockout procedures if the person was anywhere near the motion range of any machine.

The case would be based around how good the machines error feedback is.
This is why you use active high (if it has power, its OK, if it has no power, it is not) switches
you can tell if one is not working right away rather than hope it triggers before your head is crushed.
 
2017-03-16 12:40:48 PM  

DaStompa: Might have a case, but most likely incorrect lockout procedures if the person was anywhere near the motion range of any machine.

The case would be based around how good the machines error feedback is.
This is why you use active high (if it has power, its OK, if it has no power, it is not) switches
you can tell if one is not working right away rather than hope it triggers before your head is crushed.


Er I meant active low, no coffee this morning ~.~
 
2017-03-16 01:30:26 PM  

edmo: "The machine loaded the hardware onto Holbrook's head."

[img.fark.net image 400x225]


"Here's your ****ing milk, baby!"
 
2017-03-16 02:21:22 PM  
I looked at my notes and I didn't like them. And then the murders began.

/obscure?
 
2017-03-16 06:59:43 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: You only have to smell 440V@150A going through human flesh once.


440V goes through human flesh at the mA level at best.
 
2017-03-17 12:05:07 AM  

LoneVVolf: Tr0mBoNe: You only have to smell 440V@150A going through human flesh once.

440V goes through human flesh at the mA level at best.


don't be so pessimistic. maybe Tr0mBoNe was thinking of a circuit pushing a constant 150A. In that case, it would be 150A @ 75,000V or so.
 
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