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(CNN)   Fed raises interest rates to 1%, signals more to come. Wall Street responds by lighting more $100 bills on fire   ( money.cnn.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Dow Jones Industrial Average, Federal Reserve System, Monetary policy, Fed, Dow Jones & Company, Interest rate, Great Depression, Dow Jones  
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802 clicks; posted to Business » on 15 Mar 2017 at 3:34 PM (30 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-03-15 03:41:22 PM  
Maybe these clowns will take it back up to 20% and it will be worth having regular savings again instead of trusting literally your whole future to the Hookers and Blow 9000 Index.
 
2017-03-15 03:43:23 PM  
Yes!  Now I'll make $10 more dollars on my savings account!

/and pay way more than that in extra interest on my next car loan
//thanks, Yellen
///not
 
2017-03-15 03:46:03 PM  

Grand_Moff_Joseph: Yes!  Now I'll make $10 more dollars on my savings account!

/and pay way more than that in extra interest on my next car loan
//thanks, Yellen
///not


Interest rates on savings accounts are not going up, sillyhead.
 
2017-03-15 03:49:23 PM  

HempHead: Grand_Moff_Joseph: Yes!  Now I'll make $10 more dollars on my savings account!

/and pay way more than that in extra interest on my next car loan
//thanks, Yellen
///not

Interest rates on savings accounts are not going up, sillyhead.


Why not?

And this is going to get fun, soon. Make borrowing more expensive, but easier with the new FICO standards. The bankers have to love, love, love this.
 
2017-03-15 03:51:56 PM  
So, now the "signals" are gonna trickle down?
Oh goody.
 
2017-03-15 03:52:04 PM  
So far no goldbugs or BitCoin evangelists in this thread... let's see how long that lasts.
 
2017-03-15 03:57:27 PM  

majestic: HempHead: Grand_Moff_Joseph: Yes!  Now I'll make $10 more dollars on my savings account!

/and pay way more than that in extra interest on my next car loan
//thanks, Yellen
///not

Interest rates on savings accounts are not going up, sillyhead.

Why not?

And this is going to get fun, soon. Make borrowing more expensive, but easier with the new FICO standards. The bankers have to love, love, love this.


Banks are flush with cash. They only raise interest rates when they need cash.
 
2017-03-15 04:01:38 PM  
Here it comes...

img.fark.net
 
2017-03-15 04:02:23 PM  
For a historic perspective

img.fark.net
 
2017-03-15 04:02:58 PM  

edmo: Here it comes...

[img.fark.net image 470x358]


Great!
It all depends on what your definition of "great" is.
 
2017-03-15 04:05:09 PM  
I am starting to see why Mexico is gonna build that wall.
USA is way too expensive to be poor in.
The poor of USA will shortly have no choice but head south.
 
2017-03-15 04:06:00 PM  
Come on inflation.  Pappa wants to shrink his mortgage as a percentage of his income..... assuming my income somewhat tracks inflation.... I hope.
 
2017-03-15 04:07:47 PM  
To counterbalance the rate increase, we just need to extend the life of a mortgage. How does a 50-year term sound? Then we can get more people in the housing market.
 
2017-03-15 04:10:01 PM  

Arkanaut: So far no goldbugs or BitCoin evangelists in this thread... let's see how long that lasts.


Buy my gold-plated, silver imprinted certificates on MyrdinnCoin today! Guaranteed to fluctuate only according to my mood, and not something as ooky as the appearance of faith in other folks' opinions on the meaning of "worthy worth" is.
 
2017-03-15 04:14:15 PM  

Action Replay Nick: Maybe these clowns will take it back up to 20% and it will be worth having regular savings again instead of trusting literally your whole future to the Hookers and Blow 9000 Index.


Has there ever been a time that savings accounts paid enough over inflation to make them a legitimate growth option relative to equities?
 
2017-03-15 04:16:07 PM  

dukeblue219: Action Replay Nick: Maybe these clowns will take it back up to 20% and it will be worth having regular savings again instead of trusting literally your whole future to the Hookers and Blow 9000 Index.

Has there ever been a time that savings accounts paid enough over inflation to make them a legitimate growth option relative to equities?


No.
 
2017-03-15 04:18:04 PM  

dukeblue219: Action Replay Nick: Maybe these clowns will take it back up to 20% and it will be worth having regular savings again instead of trusting literally your whole future to the Hookers and Blow 9000 Index.

Has there ever been a time that savings accounts paid enough over inflation to make them a legitimate growth option relative to equities?


That... would eliminate the desire for equities. Thus, not only "no" but in the realm of "nuh uh. Unpossible. Me wants to make monies here and there."
 
2017-03-15 04:27:42 PM  
Exactly. Too many people want a return to 5% savings accounts without realizing that wasn't necessarily a "better" investment. I'd take a booming stock market with 0% inflation and 0% savings accounts any day.
 
2017-03-15 04:38:28 PM  
Nobody has a credit card?

This'll cost people who carry a balance an extra $1.6 billion dollars.  Straight into the coffers of the lenders.  And that's just credit cards.
 
2017-03-15 04:42:40 PM  
Against the advice of one mortgage broker, we locked in a rate two weeks ago with a different one. Suck it, first guy.

/he was a sleezebag
 
2017-03-15 04:43:58 PM  

jethroe: Nobody has a credit card?

This'll cost people who carry a balance an extra $1.6 billion dollars.  Straight into the coffers of the lenders.  And that's just credit cards.


I've never even heard of the concept of borrowing.
 
2017-03-15 04:46:06 PM  

dukeblue219: Exactly. Too many people want a return to 5% savings accounts without realizing that wasn't necessarily a "better" investment. I'd take a booming stock market with 0% inflation and 0% savings accounts any day.

Yes, but if it *feels* like they have more money in their pocket, people respond accordingly with their spending. Folks have been complaining about wage growth being stagnant, however, as you point out, inflation has been pretty darned close to zero too.

I suspect we'd have a ton of people excited that they get a 5% bump in their take-home income, while largely ignoring that they face 6% annual inflation to do so.
 
2017-03-15 04:46:48 PM  
I remember getting 6.0% on a CD in the late 90s......that seemed low compared to the stock market at the time so I moved all my money in there.


Bad idea.
 
2017-03-15 04:47:52 PM  

Theaetetus: Against the advice of one mortgage broker, we locked in a rate two weeks ago with a different one. Suck it, first guy.

/he was a sleezebag


Locked in back in December, signed the paperwork in January. Rate has already jumped 0.5%. Although the ARM was nice for a while.
 
2017-03-15 04:51:47 PM  

Erik_Emune: Theaetetus: Against the advice of one mortgage broker, we locked in a rate two weeks ago with a different one. Suck it, first guy.

/he was a sleezebag

Locked in back in December, signed the paperwork in January. Rate has already jumped 0.5%. Although the ARM was nice for a while.


We signed our P&S 2 weeks ago, but our closing isn't until the end of May (we're on a lease, old guy selling the place has a ton to move, so it works out well for both of us; not so much for the realtors). So this sleezebag broker kept saying "oh, you want to wait... why, rates could drop before then!" Bullshiat.

/he would constantly call, making lots of promises, but refused to ever put anything in writing
//ran a hard credit check on us without our permission, leaving us to explain it to the new mortgage broker
 
2017-03-15 04:53:54 PM  

nekom: jethroe: Nobody has a credit card?

This'll cost people who carry a balance an extra $1.6 billion dollars.  Straight into the coffers of the lenders.  And that's just credit cards.

I've never even heard of the concept of borrowing.


I was going to say stay out of debt and rising interest rates don't matter, but damn, that new I-phone was so cool...pay off your credit card in full every month is my motto, if you can't do that, don't buy it...
 
2017-03-15 04:56:20 PM  

Myrdinn: Arkanaut: So far no goldbugs or BitCoin evangelists in this thread... let's see how long that lasts.

Buy my gold-plated, silver imprinted certificates on MyrdinnCoin today! Guaranteed to fluctuate only according to my mood, and not something as ooky as the appearance of faith in other folks' opinions on the meaning of "worthy worth" is.


Put the Twin Towers on there and you got yourself a deal!
 
2017-03-15 04:57:36 PM  

darth sunshine: nekom: jethroe: Nobody has a credit card?

This'll cost people who carry a balance an extra $1.6 billion dollars.  Straight into the coffers of the lenders.  And that's just credit cards.

I've never even heard of the concept of borrowing.

I was going to say stay out of debt and rising interest rates don't matter, but damn, that new I-phone was so cool...pay off your credit card in full every month is my motto, if you can't do that, don't buy it...


IOUSA SNL "Don't buy things you can't afford" Skit.mp4
Youtube VL3KuaFvOSc
 
2017-03-15 04:57:41 PM  

Theaetetus: Erik_Emune: Theaetetus: Against the advice of one mortgage broker, we locked in a rate two weeks ago with a different one. Suck it, first guy.

/he was a sleezebag

Locked in back in December, signed the paperwork in January. Rate has already jumped 0.5%. Although the ARM was nice for a while.

We signed our P&S 2 weeks ago, but our closing isn't until the end of May (we're on a lease, old guy selling the place has a ton to move, so it works out well for both of us; not so much for the realtors). So this sleezebag broker kept saying "oh, you want to wait... why, rates could drop before then!" Bullshiat.

/he would constantly call, making lots of promises, but refused to ever put anything in writing
//ran a hard credit check on us without our permission, leaving us to explain it to the new mortgage broker


Mortgage brokers and used-car salesmen are all of one piece.
 
2017-03-15 05:00:27 PM  

Erik_Emune: Theaetetus: Against the advice of one mortgage broker, we locked in a rate two weeks ago with a different one. Suck it, first guy.

/he was a sleezebag

Locked in back in December, signed the paperwork in January. Rate has already jumped 0.5%. Although the ARM was nice for a while.

Yup, the Mrs. and I were pretty happy with a refi we just locked down. The best part is that the credit union reimbursed absolutely every single fee involved (credit report fee, flood cert fee, tax registration, title - lenders fee, title settlement/escrow fee, & recording fee = $1,200 worth). We lowered our rate, lowered our monthly payments by a 1/3rd, and dropped to a 12-year loan - without paying a penny. Signing for bi-weekly payments, it then becomes an 11-year loan, which is even better.

img.fark.net

I want to pay the home off early, but with rates that cheap - I now question it a bit.

/who am I kidding
//of course I want to pay it off ASAP
 
2017-03-15 05:01:08 PM  

MrSteve007: inflation has been pretty darned close to zero too.


so they say, but have you noticed the prices on a box of nails at home dumpo?  I was there the other day, and the guy next to me was "look what they are charging for this box of nails!  it's getting obscene!"  Nails that went for $1.99 a lb are now 8 or 9$ a lb.  maybe I'm just getting old...
 
2017-03-15 05:04:39 PM  

darth sunshine: MrSteve007: inflation has been pretty darned close to zero too.

so they say, but have you noticed the prices on a box of nails at home dumpo?  I was there the other day, and the guy next to me was "look what they are charging for this box of nails!  it's getting obscene!"  Nails that went for $1.99 a lb are now 8 or 9$ a lb.  maybe I'm just getting old...


I gave up using nails a long time ago.  Glue-It-And-Screw-It.
 
2017-03-15 05:08:09 PM  

darth sunshine: MrSteve007: inflation has been pretty darned close to zero too.

so they say, but have you noticed the prices on a box of nails at home dumpo?  I was there the other day, and the guy next to me was "look what they are charging for this box of nails!  it's getting obscene!"  Nails that went for $1.99 a lb are now 8 or 9$ a lb.  maybe I'm just getting old...


What kinds of nails are you buying? Framing nails at Home Depot are about $10 for a 5 pound pack.
 
2017-03-15 05:08:47 PM  

darth sunshine: MrSteve007: inflation has been pretty darned close to zero too.

so they say, but have you noticed the prices on a box of nails at home dumpo?  I was there the other day, and the guy next to me was "look what they are charging for this box of nails!  it's getting obscene!"  Nails that went for $1.99 a lb are now 8 or 9$ a lb.  maybe I'm just getting old...

Counterpoint:
US household energy spending hits 50-year low

"Energy consumption as a share of total household consumption expenditures averaged 3.9 percent in 2016, the first time it has dropped below 4.0 percent since records began, according to the factbook."

Modern household energy prices have never been lower than they are today.
 
2017-03-15 05:10:52 PM  

MrSteve007: darth sunshine: MrSteve007: inflation has been pretty darned close to zero too.

so they say, but have you noticed the prices on a box of nails at home dumpo?  I was there the other day, and the guy next to me was "look what they are charging for this box of nails!  it's getting obscene!"  Nails that went for $1.99 a lb are now 8 or 9$ a lb.  maybe I'm just getting old...
Counterpoint:
US household energy spending hits 50-year low

"Energy consumption as a share of total household consumption expenditures averaged 3.9 percent in 2016, the first time it has dropped below 4.0 percent since records began, according to the factbook."

Modern household energy prices costs have never been lower than they are today.


Efficiency has reduced energy use.
 
2017-03-15 05:12:34 PM  

MrSteve007: Erik_Emune: Theaetetus: Against the advice of one mortgage broker, we locked in a rate two weeks ago with a different one. Suck it, first guy.

/he was a sleezebag

Locked in back in December, signed the paperwork in January. Rate has already jumped 0.5%. Although the ARM was nice for a while.
Yup, the Mrs. and I were pretty happy with a refi we just locked down. The best part is that the credit union reimbursed absolutely every single fee involved (credit report fee, flood cert fee, tax registration, title - lenders fee, title settlement/escrow fee, & recording fee = $1,200 worth). We lowered our rate, lowered our monthly payments by a 1/3rd, and dropped to a 12-year loan - without paying a penny. Signing for bi-weekly payments, it then becomes an 11-year loan, which is even better.

[img.fark.net image 611x217]

I want to pay the home off early, but with rates that cheap - I now question it a bit.

/who am I kidding
//of course I want to pay it off ASAP


pay it off as quick as you can, My wife and I did and not having a mortgage is one of the best feelings you can have.  it's painful while you do it, but worth it.  The time to start is as early in the mortgage as possible since that's the period where the banks make most of their money.  many keep the loan for the first year or two and sell it off
 
2017-03-15 05:13:50 PM  

max_pooper: darth sunshine: MrSteve007: inflation has been pretty darned close to zero too.

so they say, but have you noticed the prices on a box of nails at home dumpo?  I was there the other day, and the guy next to me was "look what they are charging for this box of nails!  it's getting obscene!"  Nails that went for $1.99 a lb are now 8 or 9$ a lb.  maybe I'm just getting old...

What kinds of nails are you buying? Framing nails at Home Depot are about $10 for a 5 pound pack.

Yeah, here in Seattle - home of the $15 minimum wage, nails at Home Depot seem to be going between $2 and $3 a lb - depending on type.

img.fark.net

img.fark.net

And unlike in Gramp's day - it looks like if you want ~20 lbs of nails, you get free shipping.
 
2017-03-15 05:14:16 PM  

The Googles Do Nothing: darth sunshine: MrSteve007: inflation has been pretty darned close to zero too.

so they say, but have you noticed the prices on a box of nails at home dumpo?  I was there the other day, and the guy next to me was "look what they are charging for this box of nails!  it's getting obscene!"  Nails that went for $1.99 a lb are now 8 or 9$ a lb.  maybe I'm just getting old...

I gave up using nails a long time ago.  Glue-It-And-Screw-It.


stainless steel screws are over 20$ a lb....
 
2017-03-15 05:48:50 PM  

darth sunshine: pay it off as quick as you can, My wife and I did and not having a mortgage is one of the best feelings you can have.


There's almost no such thing in Seattle given that taxes and inurance are well over a third of my total payment. Even if my duplex loan were paid off I'd still have to pay $800 a month for taxes and insurance. I refi'd last year into another 7/1 (converts to adjustable rate 30 in 2023) and realistically I'll never pay it off and don't really intend to. Trying to hoard some cash for another rental property that, in my imagination, will net me a lot more than a paid off house will in the end. I could move a bunch of shiat around and pay the house off but my big real estate spreadsheet says I'm better off with a mortgage at this point.
 
2017-03-15 06:07:50 PM  

max_pooper: dukeblue219: Action Replay Nick: Maybe these clowns will take it back up to 20% and it will be worth having regular savings again instead of trusting literally your whole future to the Hookers and Blow 9000 Index.

Has there ever been a time that savings accounts paid enough over inflation to make them a legitimate growth option relative to equities?

No.


img.fark.net
 
2017-03-15 06:15:28 PM  

JohnBigBootay: darth sunshine: pay it off as quick as you can, My wife and I did and not having a mortgage is one of the best feelings you can have.

There's almost no such thing in Seattle given that taxes and inurance are well over a third of my total payment. Even if my duplex loan were paid off I'd still have to pay $800 a month for taxes and insurance. I refi'd last year into another 7/1 (converts to adjustable rate 30 in 2023) and realistically I'll never pay it off and don't really intend to. Trying to hoard some cash for another rental property that, in my imagination, will net me a lot more than a paid off house will in the end. I could move a bunch of shiat around and pay the house off but my big real estate spreadsheet says I'm better off with a mortgage at this point.

For me, it's a matter of mitigating risk vs. potential reward. My father was diagnosed with Leukemia in his mid 30's, my brother died of natural causes in his early 40's. If something were to happen to me, or happen to my wife, I want to make sure my family doesn't have to undergo hardship. With a paid-off house, especially if I can make that house ultra efficient for low utility bills, means that covering a ~$600 a month property tax and insurance cost isn't that big of a deal.
 
2017-03-15 06:30:51 PM  

Action Replay Nick: Maybe these clowns will take it back up to 20% and it will be worth having regular savings again instead of trusting literally your whole future to the Hookers and Blow 9000 Index.


you know how i can tell you dont remember a double-digit prime rate?
 
2017-03-15 06:50:24 PM  

JohnBigBootay: darth sunshine: pay it off as quick as you can, My wife and I did and not having a mortgage is one of the best feelings you can have.

There's almost no such thing in Seattle given that taxes and inurance are well over a third of my total payment. Even if my duplex loan were paid off I'd still have to pay $800 a month for taxes and insurance. I refi'd last year into another 7/1 (converts to adjustable rate 30 in 2023) and realistically I'll never pay it off and don't really intend to. Trying to hoard some cash for another rental property that, in my imagination, will net me a lot more than a paid off house will in the end. I could move a bunch of shiat around and pay the house off but my big real estate spreadsheet says I'm better off with a mortgage at this point.


then take out the largest heloc you can and leverage yourself to the hilt, why think small?  Not having any debt and being fiscally conservative may not be glamorous, but we're not losing sleep trying to keep juggling all the fiscal balls either.  The interest we are not paying banks and mortgage companies goes into our pockets not theirs, we use it to further our growth and lifestyle. I understand the theory, why make 3.65%  by paying back the loan when I can make more with the money, but you can't put a price on not owing anyone anything.  mark cuban's financial advice for success is pay off all your debt 1st, then grow.  trying to do both at the same time makes for many years of being cash poor and asset rich and living paycheck to paycheck which is what the banks want you to do...
 
2017-03-15 06:59:52 PM  
Good thing they stepped in with inflation at a whopping two percent! Wouldn't want to let that get out of control. Somebody might actually get a pay increase, and that ultimately comes out of the pockets of shareholders, you know.
 
2017-03-15 07:41:07 PM  

Saiga410: For a historic perspective

[img.fark.net image 850x377]


Yawn.

img.fark.net
 
2017-03-15 07:55:31 PM  

darth sunshine: JohnBigBootay: darth sunshine: pay it off as quick as you can, My wife and I did and not having a mortgage is one of the best feelings you can have.

There's almost no such thing in Seattle given that taxes and inurance are well over a third of my total payment. Even if my duplex loan were paid off I'd still have to pay $800 a month for taxes and insurance. I refi'd last year into another 7/1 (converts to adjustable rate 30 in 2023) and realistically I'll never pay it off and don't really intend to. Trying to hoard some cash for another rental property that, in my imagination, will net me a lot more than a paid off house will in the end. I could move a bunch of shiat around and pay the house off but my big real estate spreadsheet says I'm better off with a mortgage at this point.

then take out the largest heloc you can and leverage yourself to the hilt, why think small?  Not having any debt and being fiscally conservative may not be glamorous, but we're not losing sleep trying to keep juggling all the fiscal balls either.  The interest we are not paying banks and mortgage companies goes into our pockets not theirs, we use it to further our growth and lifestyle. I understand the theory, why make 3.65%  by paying back the loan when I can make more with the money, but you can't put a price on not owing anyone anything.  mark cuban's financial advice for success is pay off all your debt 1st, then grow.  trying to do both at the same time makes for many years of being cash poor and asset rich and living paycheck to paycheck which is what the banks want you to do...


Lot of good points. Make no mistake, I am extremely risk adverse and I'm eternally vigilant and err on the side of caution when it comes to being over leveraged. I'm in a decent spot in Seattle so the market at least thinks my house is worth a million bucks. I owe 300 on it so I feel ok on debt to equity even with a pretty severe downturn. We've had renters in the basement half for something like 150 consecutive months and they pay 2/3 of the note so it's a pretty sustainable situation even if something goes wrong. I do have a heloc for a couple hundred k but there's nothing on it. I only have another decade or so before I scale back. If I see something I like that pencils out I may take one more swing but I may not. It's a math problem and if I don't like the answer I don't bite. The last thing I am is overly optimistic. Probably a moot point in my hood. If people even smell something might be up for sale they swarm like flies and that's been going on for years. Nothing last forever though... Anyway, I can see the allure of a paid off house. I was mostly just pointing out that in some areas of the country property tax is a much larger factor than others. If I had this house paid off in Alabama I could pay my yearly expenses with spare change but in Seattle it would cost about 10k a year.
 
2017-03-15 08:00:42 PM  
First house we bought in 1988,  Interest rate was 11%.  And we put down 40%.  It was a good deal back then.  Indemtentshured (sp?)  servitude.  We loved it.  Our current mortgage is 6.5.  Yes I am a flake, but still always make the mortgage payments.  When this shiat really hits the fan, buying a house will be like Europe, forget it, unless you have the cash for a  5,000,000.00 castle, you will be in subsidized housing.
 
2017-03-15 08:05:47 PM  

MrSteve007: JohnBigBootay: darth sunshine: pay it off as quick as you can, My wife and I did and not having a mortgage is one of the best feelings you can have.

There's almost no such thing in Seattle given that taxes and inurance are well over a third of my total payment. Even if my duplex loan were paid off I'd still have to pay $800 a month for taxes and insurance. I refi'd last year into another 7/1 (converts to adjustable rate 30 in 2023) and realistically I'll never pay it off and don't really intend to. Trying to hoard some cash for another rental property that, in my imagination, will net me a lot more than a paid off house will in the end. I could move a bunch of shiat around and pay the house off but my big real estate spreadsheet says I'm better off with a mortgage at this point.
For me, it's a matter of mitigating risk vs. potential reward. My father was diagnosed with Leukemia in his mid 30's, my brother died of natural causes in his early 40's. If something were to happen to me, or happen to my wife, I want to make sure my family doesn't have to undergo hardship. With a paid-off house, especially if I can make that house ultra efficient for low utility bills, means that covering a ~$600 a month property tax and insurance cost isn't that big of a deal.


Family Health history is an important factor and you are wise to consider it. I'd do everything different if I had kids but I don't. I'm tangentially involved in the real estate game and I don't mind taking prudent risk when the opportunity arises. At the moment I just have the house I live in that has a rental attached as and a piece of a triplex on the same block that we bought several years ago. I could do one more but only if it's a perfect fit. For the time being I prefer sitting on some cash in case the right thing comes up. If it doesn't happen it doesn't happen and I can pay down the note it go to a ten year and be done with it. I've got until 2023 to decide. By that point I won't have the appetite for that kind of risk but fit the time being... Maybe.
 
2017-03-15 08:17:35 PM  

DubyaHater: To counterbalance the rate increase, we just need to extend the life of a mortgage. How does a 50-year term sound? Then we can get more people in the housing market.


But I already have one of those.  It's called a student loan.  :o
 
2017-03-15 10:12:45 PM  
Individual citizens should be able to borrow from the Fed directly. Not only would this cut out the middlemen, it would, for once and for all, be an official admission that they're making it all up as they go along, too.
 
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