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(Spaceflight Insider)   Space X launching large tonight, its last expected expendable Falcon 9 takes EchoStar 23 to a 22k mile geostationary orbit from Kennedy's 39A. 2.5hr launch window opens at 1:34AM EDT *link to live stream in 1st post*   ( spaceflightinsider.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Launch Complex, Launch Complex 39A, Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Kennedy Space Center, Rocket, SpaceX, Space Launch Complex  
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725 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Mar 2017 at 9:50 AM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-03-13 09:34:21 AM  
 
2017-03-13 10:11:16 AM  
 
2017-03-13 10:22:27 AM  
People only watch those things for the crashes.
 
2017-03-13 10:29:49 AM  
No landing attempt, so I think I'll sleep through this one.
 
2017-03-13 10:34:57 AM  

FrancoFile: No landing attempt


You're the landing attempt.
 
2017-03-13 10:44:44 AM  
Cool bonus news about the next launch being the first of the used landing stages.. Not sure I realized they had eight used ones in the stable.
The first one now out on the lawn at SpaceX HQ leaves seven to play with I guess..
 
2017-03-13 11:28:33 AM  
Meanwhile in North Korea, progress in their space program has greatly improved.

img.fark.net
 
2017-03-13 12:28:58 PM  

dr_blasto: expected to delay due to weather: http://www.patrick.af.mil/Portals/14/documents/Weather/L-0%20​Forecast%2014%20Mar%20Launch.pdf?ver=2017-03-13-083052-670


I figured that'd be the case.

One of these days I'll learn to look for "pdf" in a link when I'm on my phone.
 
2017-03-13 12:45:51 PM  
75% of the time in that webcast will be telling potential viewers that there will NOT be a landing attempt.....on purpose
 
2017-03-13 01:06:54 PM  

sno man: Not sure I realized they had eight used ones in the stable.


Probably one of the reasons they're willing to dunk this one. Instead of rolling the dice on a risky recovery, just put the customer in a better transfer orbit and focus on getting falcon heavy up and running (which, by the way, is also using recovered stages for the side boosters.)
 
2017-03-13 01:41:42 PM  
1:30AM?  I'll youtube it in the morning.
 
2017-03-13 02:55:24 PM  

FrancoFile: No landing attempt, so I think I'll sleep through this one.


img.fark.net
 
2017-03-13 06:35:13 PM  
WAAHH! How did I miss this!?
 
2017-03-13 06:37:09 PM  
DID I miss it!!??

WHY CANT THE NEWS IDIOTS KEEP THIS SH*T STRAIGHT
 
2017-03-13 06:40:23 PM  

Kittypie070: DID I miss it!!??

WHY CANT THE NEWS IDIOTS KEEP THIS SH*T STRAIGHT


No. Midnight-ish launch. You have about 7 hours left.
 
2017-03-13 06:40:46 PM  
ECHOSTAR XXIII MISSION

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket will deliver EchoStar XXIII, a commercial communications satellite for EchoStar Corporation, to a Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO). SpaceX is targeting launch of EchoStar XXIII from historic Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The two and a half hour launch window opens on Tuesday, March 14, at 1:34 a.m. EDT or 5:34 a.m. UTC. The satellite will be deployed approximately 34 minutes after launch.

A backup launch window opens on Thursday, March 16, at 1:35 a.m. EDT or 5:35 a.m. UTC. SpaceX will not attempt to land Falcon 9's first stage after launch due to mission requirements.


(stomps off, growling with a happy undertone)
 
2017-03-13 06:42:34 PM  
(growlsquee!)
 
2017-03-13 09:48:09 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2017-03-13 09:51:05 PM  
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/82/Orbitalaltit​udes.jpg/1920px-Orbitalaltitudes.jpg3rd is a charm
 
2017-03-13 09:51:25 PM  
uggg...never mind.
 
2017-03-13 09:58:55 PM  

italie: uggg...never mind.


I think you copied too much gobbledygook...
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/82/Orbitalaltitudes.​j​pg
 
2017-03-13 11:32:36 PM  
img.fark.netI wouldn't hold my breath
 
2017-03-14 12:08:15 AM  
Really odd seeing the Falcon without its landing legs... (expendable launch)
 
2017-03-14 01:00:14 AM  
Scrub due to weather. See y'all in two days.
 
2017-03-14 02:04:24 AM  

Flt209er: Scrub due to weather. See y'all in two days.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZmqbL-hz7U

Their Yew Tewbie 'cast has been saying Starting Soon for about 45 minutes now.

I heard nothing about a scrub or ANYTHING. Nothing whatsoever.
 
2017-03-14 04:19:26 AM  

Flt209er: sno man: Not sure I realized they had eight used ones in the stable.

Probably one of the reasons they're willing to dunk this one. Instead of rolling the dice on a risky recovery, just put the customer in a better transfer orbit and focus on getting falcon heavy up and running (which, by the way, is also using recovered stages for the side boosters.)


No.

They're "willing to dunk this one" because the current booster can't put that much mass in GTO and still have enough fuel left over to land. It's not a "better" transfer orbit, you either have enough energy to get where you're going or you don't. There's no dice to roll, there simply isn't enough delta V.

The block 5 will have enough, (plus tweaks to improve serviceability, plus new COPVs for the helium) so they expect to recover most if not all block 5 launches. Especially since 9 heavy should be up soon to take anything block 5 can't do a launch and return profile for.

/read WAAAY too much on this stuff
//Also KSP :P
///You ever notice Musk's response to not enough lift was to add more boosters?
 
2017-03-14 12:12:03 PM  

GrendelMk1: It's not a "better" transfer orbit, you either have enough energy to get where you're going or you don't.


Or course you can get a better orbit. All vehicles launch with excess margin in the event of under-performance. Spacex simply takes that practice to a new level. See SES-9 for a comparable sat. That was a heavy bird, and it was launched into a better-than-negotiated orbit to make up for time lost during the CRS-7 stand-down. They did this by burning as much margin as possible on both stages, which includes re-purposing some of their landing fuel as boosting fuel. Two options here. Re-purpose all of the landing fuel and launch to a still-yet-better orbit, or try to land the stage with smaller margins. Spacex chose the latter. Stage came down hard and punched a hole in the deck of the recovery ship requiring it to be held up for repairs. With 7+1 cores recovered, I find it quite likely they simply chose the former option in this case and decided it was more important to keep the barge operational. Makes sense when your near-term goal is to drastically increase launch cadence.

We'll get a better idea when the sat is up and being tracked. Space-x usually targets a GTO-1800 orbit (as opposed to Atlas/Arianne targeting GTO-1500). If this sat goes into an orbit closer to -1500, we'll have our answer.
 
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