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(WTOP)   Are you the "bad emailer" in the office? Here's how to tell   ( wtop.com) divider line
    More: Dumbass, email, E-mail, personal email style, emails, common ways people, Search Faux Pas, epic reply-all failures, E-mail tracking  
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8519 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jan 2017 at 8:50 AM (36 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-01-11 08:10:08 AM  
I write extremely verbose emails.  No one will stop me, have been doing so since I entered the professional world in 1997.

That way everything is documented that I need, why, and most likely how.  Not draconian... I ask questions, offer others to provide solutions, all around good stuff.  But... verbose.

People can read lengthy text.  They really can.  They've been taught bad habits of not doing so with current forms of communication, but tough.  You read books to better your professional career, no?

You can take my 1,000+ word emails from my cold, dead, carpal-tunnelled hands.
 
2017-01-11 08:18:18 AM  

downstairs: I write extremely verbose emails.  No one will stop me, have been doing so since I entered the professional world in 1997.

That way everything is documented that I need, why, and most likely how.  Not draconian... I ask questions, offer others to provide solutions, all around good stuff.  But... verbose.

People can read lengthy text.  They really can.  They've been taught bad habits of not doing so with current forms of communication, but tough.  You read books to better your professional career, no?

You can take my 1,000+ word emails from my cold, dead, carpal-tunnelled hands.


I had a staff member that did the same thing.  He'd write these lengthy emails that nobody would read and then ask for the information he already provided.  So I convinced him to do put a tl;dr of exactly what he wanted the recipient to do at the top, then write everything else under it.  I do it occasionally now.
 
2017-01-11 08:22:57 AM  
I used to work with a guy who would consistently fail to read every e-mail in a thread before responding (often to each e-mail). He was guilty of several items on that list too (long responses, cc'ing management--though usually his own), so it was funny/not funny to sit there and read his tirades about a problem that you and everyone active on the distribution knew was already solved and this guy just hadn't gotten to that e-mail yet.

All that being said, he took his job a lot more seriously than most of his colleagues, who were way on the other end of the spectrum.
 
2017-01-11 08:24:03 AM  
media.licdn.com

tl;dr
 
2017-01-11 08:35:01 AM  

enry: downstairs: I write extremely verbose emails.  No one will stop me, have been doing so since I entered the professional world in 1997.

That way everything is documented that I need, why, and most likely how.  Not draconian... I ask questions, offer others to provide solutions, all around good stuff.  But... verbose.

People can read lengthy text.  They really can.  They've been taught bad habits of not doing so with current forms of communication, but tough.  You read books to better your professional career, no?

You can take my 1,000+ word emails from my cold, dead, carpal-tunnelled hands.

I had a staff member that did the same thing.  He'd write these lengthy emails that nobody would read and then ask for the information he already provided.  So I convinced him to do put a tl;dr of exactly what he wanted the recipient to do at the top, then write everything else under it.  I do it occasionally now.


I was actually being a but curt with my original post... but yeah, verbosity is something I'm battling with.  I have a very very complex job (basically the job of multiple people who would be tackling multiple specific, but very different aspects of the company).

I always get crap for my verbosity, luckily never from my business partners over the years actually.  I've even asked them, and offered them to tell me to make it more brief or joke about it.

But yeah, a tl;dr at the top sounds like a good idea.

But I still am going to document everything and explain all the nuances and eventualities that come to mind... because that's how I think... I think of every possible eventuality (that I can think of, I'm not god, I don't know all... ha!)  But one skill I do have is thinking of a ton of ways things can spider out and affect other things.  So I detail all of that.
 
2017-01-11 08:38:38 AM  
That's an overly detailed list. Here's a quicker way to assess your email habits and adjust your behavior positively if it's found lacking.

Being overly brusque.
If your email simply repeats your subject line, set yourself on fire.

Sending emails that are far too lengthy.
Sending emails where it's not clear what you're asking the recipient to do.
Sending emails that are hard to reply to.

If your email requires more than a sentence to summarize or reply to, set yourself on fire. After you recover, use the phone or set up a meeting next time.

Requesting read receipts.
Do not request read receipts. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Copying your co-worker's manager on an email without cause.
Never copy anyone who is not explicitly expecting it. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Replying-all unnecessarily.
Only use reply all if a) everyone is explicitly expecting it and b) requires your reply to proceed with whatever action is being discussed. Otherwise, set yourself on fire.

Getting heated or snarky in an email.
Assume anyone sending business emails is far too stupid to understand how to employ sarcasm or wit, including you. If you ignore this and do it anyway, set yourself on fire.

There. You're welcome.
 
2017-01-11 08:41:10 AM  
I am with downstairs, in many respects.  I try to keep it succinct, but I also want to ensure that my ass is covered, and that there is no room for misinterpretation.
 
2017-01-11 08:45:24 AM  

Pocket Ninja: That's an overly detailed list. Here's a quicker way to assess your email habits and adjust your behavior positively if it's found lacking.

Being overly brusque.
If your email simply repeats your subject line, set yourself on fire.

Sending emails that are far too lengthy.
Sending emails where it's not clear what you're asking the recipient to do.
Sending emails that are hard to reply to.
If your email requires more than a sentence to summarize or reply to, set yourself on fire. After you recover, use the phone or set up a meeting next time.

Requesting read receipts.
Do not request read receipts. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Copying your co-worker's manager on an email without cause.
Never copy anyone who is not explicitly expecting it. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Replying-all unnecessarily.
Only use reply all if a) everyone is explicitly expecting it and b) requires your reply to proceed with whatever action is being discussed. Otherwise, set yourself on fire.

Getting heated or snarky in an email.
Assume anyone sending business emails is far too stupid to understand how to employ sarcasm or wit, including you. If you ignore this and do it anyway, set yourself on fire.

There. You're welcome.


I'm going to need a snapshot from 30,000 feet so I can get ahead of this paradigm shift you're trotting out, but it seems like a sexy concept that has a place in the OK Corral.
 
2017-01-11 08:57:04 AM  

downstairs: But I still am going to document everything and explain all the nuances and eventualities that come to mind... because that's how I think... I think of every possible eventuality (that I can think of, I'm not god, I don't know all... ha!)  But one skill I do have is thinking of a ton of ways things can spider out and affect other things.  So I detail all of that.


While that's not bad, the problem is usually nobody else cares since they have stuff to do other than read emails. An email should be what do you want, signature, done. What you're describing sounds like it should be a weekly project summary, not something you do all the time in email.
 
2017-01-11 08:57:20 AM  
My favourite is receiving an email that simply says, "Can you look into this?" or something similar, and then I get to scroll down through two weeks of email conversations I didn't know were going on and try to determine wtf I'm being asked to do.
 
2017-01-11 08:57:54 AM  
I always end my work emails with quotes from Nicholas Sparks novels.  Sometimes entire chapters.
 
2017-01-11 08:58:28 AM  
Pocket Ninja:  Being overly brusque.
If your email simply repeats your subject line, set yourself on fire.


How about if the body is blank and everything I want to convey is in the subject line?  I've been guilty of this on many occasions, and am typically overly brusque.

/I'll get the matches.
 
2017-01-11 08:58:58 AM  
The worst are the ones who let you know via e-mail that you're not important enough for them to do basic things like proofread, capitalize, punctuate, etc.; the ones whose e-mails you have to read three times just to get a sense of what they're trying to say. Especially when you know they're quite capable of writing coherently.
 
2017-01-11 09:02:06 AM  

MooseBayou: Pocket Ninja: That's an overly detailed list. Here's a quicker way to assess your email habits and adjust your behavior positively if it's found lacking.

Being overly brusque.
If your email simply repeats your subject line, set yourself on fire.

Sending emails that are far too lengthy.
Sending emails where it's not clear what you're asking the recipient to do.
Sending emails that are hard to reply to.
If your email requires more than a sentence to summarize or reply to, set yourself on fire. After you recover, use the phone or set up a meeting next time.

Requesting read receipts.
Do not request read receipts. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Copying your co-worker's manager on an email without cause.
Never copy anyone who is not explicitly expecting it. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Replying-all unnecessarily.
Only use reply all if a) everyone is explicitly expecting it and b) requires your reply to proceed with whatever action is being discussed. Otherwise, set yourself on fire.

Getting heated or snarky in an email.
Assume anyone sending business emails is far too stupid to understand how to employ sarcasm or wit, including you. If you ignore this and do it anyway, set yourself on fire.

There. You're welcome.

I'm going to need a snapshot from 30,000 feet so I can get ahead of this paradigm shift you're trotting out, but it seems like a sexy concept that has a place in the OK Corral.


If you use hackneyed phrases as a crutch, or for that matter at all, set yourself on fire.
 
2017-01-11 09:02:17 AM  
RE: Lengthy emails

Once was advised by a manager that if it takes more than 5 minutes to write the email, just pick up the phone.

Seems like decent advice.

Also, If you fancy yourself the Mark Twain of emails and feel you MUST write more than a few sentences, make it an attached document and farking edit it. And by edit, I mean slash half the crap you wrote because it is either redundant, irrelevant or unintelligible.
 
2017-01-11 09:02:18 AM  
As a general rule I don't request read receipts however I have had one or two co-workers over the years who were not responsible with replying to time-sensitive emails so I have used it as a passive-aggressive tactic to basically say "hurry the fark up".
 
2017-01-11 09:03:35 AM  
This one always makes me want to punch a baby:

"<broad statement of problem with no specific question or action item>

Please advise."
 
2017-01-11 09:03:42 AM  
My old boss would use comic sans and a different color in each paragraph of his verbose emails.
 
2017-01-11 09:04:54 AM  

Igor Jakovsky: My old boss would use comic sans and a different color in each paragraph of his verbose emails.


Fabulous!
 
2017-01-11 09:05:21 AM  

Igor Jakovsky: My old boss would use comic sans and a different color in each paragraph of his verbose emails.


That crosses the line between ordinary villainy and cartoonish supervillainy
 
2017-01-11 09:06:15 AM  

Barfmaker: My favourite is receiving an email that simply says, "Can you look into this?" or something similar, and then I get to scroll down through two weeks of email conversations I didn't know were going on and try to determine wtf I'm being asked to do.


>>>>Oh yeah, and if your company attaches a notice to every email
>>>>>>>and other people use some farked up special formatting for their emails, then there's no hope at
>>>>>all of making any sense of most of the email chain.

This message may be scanned for compliance.  Lorem ipsum blah blah blah blah blah.
 
2017-01-11 09:06:52 AM  

Barfmaker: My favourite is receiving an email that simply says, "Can you look into this?" or something similar, and then I get to scroll down through two weeks of email conversations I didn't know were going on and try to determine wtf I'm being asked to do.


This weekend, or maybe the one after, you and me are going to head down to Walmart together and buy black clothes; shoes, pants, turtlenecks, beanies and everything.  Then the following night, we're going to rent a van and driving around killing this f*ckers in their sleep.  It'll be fun.
 
2017-01-11 09:07:39 AM  
They forgot spelling mistakes and poor grammar.

There is a manager where I work whose emails always contain spelling and grammar mistakes.  It could be a simple, single sentence email and there will be a mistake.
 
2017-01-11 09:07:55 AM  

Pocket Ninja: That's an overly detailed list. Here's a quicker way to assess your email habits and adjust your behavior positively if it's found lacking.

Being overly brusque.
If your email simply repeats your subject line, set yourself on fire.

Sending emails that are far too lengthy.
Sending emails where it's not clear what you're asking the recipient to do.
Sending emails that are hard to reply to.
If your email requires more than a sentence to summarize or reply to, set yourself on fire. After you recover, use the phone or set up a meeting next time.

Requesting read receipts.
Do not request read receipts. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Copying your co-worker's manager on an email without cause.
Never copy anyone who is not explicitly expecting it. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Replying-all unnecessarily.
Only use reply all if a) everyone is explicitly expecting it and b) requires your reply to proceed with whatever action is being discussed. Otherwise, set yourself on fire.

Getting heated or snarky in an email.
Assume anyone sending business emails is far too stupid to understand how to employ sarcasm or wit, including you. If you ignore this and do it anyway, set yourself on fire.

There. You're welcome.


Great, thanks

--------<signature>--------
Thanks,
dr_iacovone
 
2017-01-11 09:08:12 AM  
"Please to do the needful, and kindly revert the same."

/eye twitching...
 
2017-01-11 09:08:30 AM  
I like ending my emails with a random quote form NDT

"Curious that we spend more time congratulating people who have succeeded than encouraging people who have not."
 
2017-01-11 09:09:09 AM  

taoistlumberjak: Barfmaker: My favourite is receiving an email that simply says, "Can you look into this?" or something similar, and then I get to scroll down through two weeks of email conversations I didn't know were going on and try to determine wtf I'm being asked to do.

>>>>Oh yeah, and if your company attaches a notice to every email
>>>>>>>and other people use some farked up special formatting for their emails, then there's no hope at
>>>>>all of making any sense of most of the email chain.

This message may be scanned for compliance.  Lorem ipsum blah blah blah blah blah.


"Oh, and if my dumb ass sent this to you by mistake, you are hereby ORDERED UNDER PENALTY OF TESTICULAR AVULSION  to delete it and not tell ANYONE, or WE WILL FIND YOU."
 
2017-01-11 09:09:33 AM  

MooseBayou: Pocket Ninja: That's an overly detailed list. Here's a quicker way to assess your email habits and adjust your behavior positively if it's found lacking.

Being overly brusque.
If your email simply repeats your subject line, set yourself on fire.

Sending emails that are far too lengthy.
Sending emails where it's not clear what you're asking the recipient to do.
Sending emails that are hard to reply to.
If your email requires more than a sentence to summarize or reply to, set yourself on fire. After you recover, use the phone or set up a meeting next time.

Requesting read receipts.
Do not request read receipts. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Copying your co-worker's manager on an email without cause.
Never copy anyone who is not explicitly expecting it. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Replying-all unnecessarily.
Only use reply all if a) everyone is explicitly expecting it and b) requires your reply to proceed with whatever action is being discussed. Otherwise, set yourself on fire.

Getting heated or snarky in an email.
Assume anyone sending business emails is far too stupid to understand how to employ sarcasm or wit, including you. If you ignore this and do it anyway, set yourself on fire.

There. You're welcome.

I'm going to need a snapshot from 30,000 feet so I can get ahead of this paradigm shift you're trotting out, but it seems like a sexy concept that has a place in the OK Corral.


When you set yourself on fire remember to film it.
 
2017-01-11 09:11:07 AM  
Dear Bossman:

Thanks for sending that email to everybody within our huge and growing company!  I love human resource policy updates!  I'm crazy that way!  LOL

Here's a whimsical glamour shot of a some LOVE KITTENS!

 images2.fanpop.com

*forward this email and LOVE KITTENS to seventeen more of your friends if you want the Power of Jesus to make 2017 cancer free for you and those you love.  Or die in agony  - your choice really*

ONWARD!

*hits REPLY ALL*
 
2017-01-11 09:13:04 AM  
I'd like to add one to the list.

Being super efficient and creating mailing lists for all your regular e-mails is only half of the farking job genius, the other half is removing people who no longer need to be on the list.
 
2017-01-11 09:13:33 AM  
I use twitter for all my official correspondence.  Like the incoming TINC.
 
2017-01-11 09:15:02 AM  
Got one to add - Expecting that everyone checks their email in a work environment that they clearly won't, and sending critical information via email alone.  I don't have a computer, or even a desk, assigned to me. I have a work email account, and I technically have access to a computer shared among 7 employees. But generally the supervisor stays logged on through the shift because A) he gets emails, and B) he has some useful real-time software loaded on his profile that the rest of us don't have.

I check my work email maybe once a month. Every now and again I come across one that was rather important, will ask the other guys "hey, did you know X happened?" and get blank stares.
 
2017-01-11 09:16:38 AM  
The only one I do on the list is be brusque, most of the responses call for just a few words. I don't need a paragraph to say "will do", now if it needs a longer response I will be happy to write it.
One email I got from a former boss was titled "Find this" it was a link to a Fed Ex package that was "lost" it said right on the link that it was on the truck. So my response was "It is on the truck to the destination" the following call was like a modern day of whose on first, I wish I had recorded it,  god that man was a moron.
 
2017-01-11 09:16:48 AM  
Be sure to have a long thoughtful think about the environment before printing this email.
 
2017-01-11 09:16:54 AM  
Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
> Why is top-posting such a bad thing?
>> Top-posting.
>>> What is the most annoying thing in e-mail?

And goddamn HTML email.
 
2017-01-11 09:18:22 AM  

lizyrd: Got one to add - Expecting that everyone checks their email in a work environment that they clearly won't, and sending critical information via email alone.  I don't have a computer, or even a desk, assigned to me. I have a work email account, and I technically have access to a computer shared among 7 employees. But generally the supervisor stays logged on through the shift because A) he gets emails, and B) he has some useful real-time software loaded on his profile that the rest of us don't have.

I check my work email maybe once a month. Every now and again I come across one that was rather important, will ask the other guys "hey, did you know X happened?" and get blank stares.


If you check your email once a month that's your problem not theirs. There are people that season their cast iron more often than that.
 
2017-01-11 09:22:13 AM  
I was the office's terse emailer most of the time because I know from loooooooong experience with email that nobody reads past the second line.  Most would never notice if the fifth line said, "Your wife should get that mole on her ass checked out by a doctor."  My email responses were usually one of these three:

Done.
Working on it.  Should be done by [time or day].
I'm not sure how to do that.  I'll do some research and get back to you with an ETA.

If an email required an information dump, no problem.  I can be verbose when necessary.
 
2017-01-11 09:22:13 AM  
I think some of these tactics depends on the organization you're working with.

One of the last places I worked for was so full of politics, the effort to CMA was exhausting.  People wouldn't read even the most basic information sent to them and would then call my boss asking for an update instead of calling me, even after I sent regular updates, held meetings and followed through with minutes.

What made it worse was every time this would happen my boss would be mad at me and I would have to go meet with him to show exactly what had been done and how it was the other person who was at fault.  Every fricken' time.
 
2017-01-11 09:23:24 AM  
Loaf's Tray
This one always makes me want to punch a baby:

"<broad statement of problem with no specific question or action item>
Please advise."


That's easy.
In response you just tell dear all to urgently do the needful.
 
2017-01-11 09:23:35 AM  
Copying your co-worker's manager on an email without cause.

Yeah don't do this. People would do this to me and nothing made and easy job more difficult than getting my manager involved.

"lets write up an SOP for this one off, non-issue!"
 
2017-01-11 09:24:29 AM  

Super Chronic: The worst are the ones who let you know via e-mail that you're not important enough for them to do basic things like proofread, capitalize, punctuate, etc.; the ones whose e-mails you have to read three times just to get a sense of what they're trying to say. Especially when you know they're quite capable of writing coherently.


I worked in publishing for a while.  Some of the most poorly constructed sentences I've ever read were written by editors.
 
2017-01-11 09:25:08 AM  
Brevity is the soul of wit. - Shakespeare

Concision in style, precision in thought, decision in life. - Victor Hugo

Vigorous writing is concise. - William Strunk, Jr.

Whinge about what you think is write, mister article writer. I'm with the guys above. And remember, if you were a good writer, you wouldn't be writing copy for US News and World Report, without even getting your name on the byline.
 
2017-01-11 09:25:42 AM  
I'm a contractor and routinely send walls of text with observations and spidering possibilities.  My clients seem to prefer having too much information than too little.
 
2017-01-11 09:25:47 AM  

randomarrangement: RE: Lengthy emails

Once was advised by a manager that if it takes more than 5 minutes to write the email, just pick up the phone.

Seems like decent advice.

Also, If you fancy yourself the Mark Twain of emails and feel you MUST write more than a few sentences, make it an attached document and farking edit it. And by edit, I mean slash half the crap you wrote because it is either redundant, irrelevant or unintelligible.


I have to disagree. The phone is great for negotiation - where explanations are needed and there needs to be a lot of back-and-forth. Also great for getting immediate attention.

However, I deal with a lot of technical information - gathering and sending it, and the phone is a terrible way to communicate that. Email can be used to document, line-by-line, what information is needed, what information is given, and it creates a paper trail as reference for when someone conveniently 'forgets' something, or changes a specification.

Email also has the advantage of not requiring instant feedback. It's quite easy to use across time zones (I can send something at 7 am EST, Bob can reply at 10 pm PST, and I get all the info I need when I show up for work the next morning).
 
2017-01-11 09:26:00 AM  
Sending emails that are far too lengthy. It's pretty rare that an email truly needs to contain more than a few paragraphs of information, and if you routinely send long, wordy emails, it's pretty likely that some of your recipients will start tuning out. If you need to communicate a large amount of information, email probably isn't the way to do it.

Screw that. What do you want, a goddamn formal memo? A scheduled meeting where you're going to take written notes anyway, duplicating the notes I'm reading off of?

That said, I start with the three-sentence executive summary: background, issue, conclusion, then discussed in detail afterwards.
 
2017-01-11 09:26:27 AM  

Priapetic: MooseBayou: Pocket Ninja: That's an overly detailed list. Here's a quicker way to assess your email habits and adjust your behavior positively if it's found lacking.

Being overly brusque.
If your email simply repeats your subject line, set yourself on fire.

Sending emails that are far too lengthy.
Sending emails where it's not clear what you're asking the recipient to do.
Sending emails that are hard to reply to.
If your email requires more than a sentence to summarize or reply to, set yourself on fire. After you recover, use the phone or set up a meeting next time.

Requesting read receipts.
Do not request read receipts. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Copying your co-worker's manager on an email without cause.
Never copy anyone who is not explicitly expecting it. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Replying-all unnecessarily.
Only use reply all if a) everyone is explicitly expecting it and b) requires your reply to proceed with whatever action is being discussed. Otherwise, set yourself on fire.

Getting heated or snarky in an email.
Assume anyone sending business emails is far too stupid to understand how to employ sarcasm or wit, including you. If you ignore this and do it anyway, set yourself on fire.

There. You're welcome.

I'm going to need a snapshot from 30,000 feet so I can get ahead of this paradigm shift you're trotting out, but it seems like a sexy concept that has a place in the OK Corral.

If you use hackneyed phrases as a crutch, or for that matter at all, set yourself on fire.


Good point; can you waterfall this to rest of the team. Thanks.
 
2017-01-11 09:26:34 AM  
Upper management loves to write fricking tomes, I swear.

I've found that while the may have a great knowledge of the subject at hand, the really long emailers can never remember what they write to anyone.

I used the read receipt a lot when responses were required (one job I had made me the input getter guy). Came in handy once when I had documentation of "never read" by one person who was failing to respond by any means to a personnel issue that could not be ignored. That's what it takes to get things moving sometimes.

/of course, sadly, I worked for the federal government
 
2017-01-11 09:29:56 AM  

Ostman: Priapetic: MooseBayou: Pocket Ninja: That's an overly detailed list. Here's a quicker way to assess your email habits and adjust your behavior positively if it's found lacking.

Being overly brusque.
If your email simply repeats your subject line, set yourself on fire.

Sending emails that are far too lengthy.
Sending emails where it's not clear what you're asking the recipient to do.
Sending emails that are hard to reply to.
If your email requires more than a sentence to summarize or reply to, set yourself on fire. After you recover, use the phone or set up a meeting next time.

Requesting read receipts.
Do not request read receipts. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Copying your co-worker's manager on an email without cause.
Never copy anyone who is not explicitly expecting it. If you do, set yourself on fire.

Replying-all unnecessarily.
Only use reply all if a) everyone is explicitly expecting it and b) requires your reply to proceed with whatever action is being discussed. Otherwise, set yourself on fire.

Getting heated or snarky in an email.
Assume anyone sending business emails is far too stupid to understand how to employ sarcasm or wit, including you. If you ignore this and do it anyway, set yourself on fire.

There. You're welcome.

I'm going to need a snapshot from 30,000 feet so I can get ahead of this paradigm shift you're trotting out, but it seems like a sexy concept that has a place in the OK Corral.

If you use hackneyed phrases as a crutch, or for that matter at all, set yourself on fire.

Good point; can you waterfall this to rest of the team. Thanks.


Ditto
 
2017-01-11 09:36:49 AM  
I hate phones and meetings are stupid.

If you can't read a few lines of email with concise, accurate detail and a clearly stated question, the problem is you.

My pet peeve (as an IT person with writing skills) is when I send caputered error text to an engineer with "Computer Y (highlighted in fluorescent yellow by MS Outlook) is having problem (Error Text) - can you send me instructions on how to fix this?" What I usually get back is, "What's the computer's name?" It's all I can do to not fly into a rage BECAUSE IT IS RIGHT THERE BOLDED ON SCREEN IN BRIGHT FARKING YELLOW YOU COLOSSAL COCKMONGER.
 
2017-01-11 09:38:23 AM  

Loaf's Tray: This one always makes me want to punch a baby:

"<broad statement of problem with no specific question or action item>

Please advise."


tse1.mm.bing.net
 
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